Anyone worried if Corona virus keeps spreading the gyms will shut down?

jtmartin18

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Does anybody recommend a brand or company with a not extremely expensive (like nowhere near rogue fitness prices) equipment that is quality? I mainly want a bench and dumbells but a trap bar with some plates would be great too.
 
BigGame84

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I’m enjoying my bands. Spent $85 on them. Need to be creative with them and the door anchor is a must but I feel like I am at the least, maintaining.
 
Rad83

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Does anybody recommend a brand or company with a not extremely expensive (like nowhere near rogue fitness prices) equipment that is quality? I mainly want a bench and dumbells but a trap bar with some plates would be great too.
Have a look at craigslist, if you haven’t...Sometimes you can score some decent stuff for cheap....Especially now when people just want stuff gone/need money sadly.....But I imagine any serious lifter is holding onto their weights now that gyms been closed and will remain for who knows how long??

I’ve been looking at what seems to be a decent trap bar on Amazon for $100ish
 
jtmartin18

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I’m enjoying my bands. Spent $85 on them. Need to be creative with them and the door anchor is a must but I feel like I am at the least, maintaining.
I'm sadly returning the Body Bosss 2.0 to amazon tomorrow, nowhere near enough resistance for em and I honestly never claim to be very strong. Not worth $180.

I want a trap bar
an ezcurl bar
plates
a bench and rack if not too expensive,
 
jtmartin18

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Have a look at craigslist, if you haven’t...Sometimes you can score some decent stuff for cheap....Especially now when people just want stuff gone/need money sadly.....But I imagine any serious lifter is holding onto their weights now that gyms been closed and will remain for who knows how long??

I’ve been looking at what seems to be a decent trap bar on Amazon for $100ish
I have one in my amazon cart right of seemingly good quality got $159. I love rogue they're amazing quality but too expensive (more like 10 times too muvh) for 99% of us IMO. Could be wrong who knows I just know im jealous of anyone with their stuff,
 
Ricky10

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How old are they? At what point do you start using chloroquin? Tnx : )
All three men are in their 60’s. Unfortunately, I don’t know the exact answer to that question without doing some research. It seems as though if you are sick enough to be hospitalized for it, you are placed on hydroxychloro and azithromycin- unless pt has contraindications of course. I have been very busy keeping up with ever changing hospital protocols and those that are specific to my department, so I don’t know those specifics. It’s very hectic!

Thank you to everyone for your appreciation! All disciplines are really struggling with this, while hospital administration is treating us very poorly and keeps finding ways to make an already difficult situation even more stressful, inconvenient, and uncomfortable. They won’t get away with this much longer, they have to give something back or people are literally going to quit. I would say at least 40% of all staff has refused to work with COVID positive patients due to their own risk factors, older age, and some are just outright having panic attacks. While the working conditions are physically uncomfortable on many levels, I know that I can handle this- so I do it. I also have more experience managing complex ventilator scenarios than the majority of my co-workers.

It’s nice to see random companies stepping up and offering discounts to healthcare workers, free doughnuts, mentions of appreciation on the radio or TV. It helps to just to hear these things and inspires me to keep going through this very long week itself. After hearing about this virus for so many months, it’s a bit surreal to finally look these patients in the eyes and talk to them in person- and see how sick they really are. In a way, I feel privileged to be able to get involved and do my best to help them. I guess that’s why I got into healthcare in the first place, which becomes easy to forget amongst all the healthcare/hospital dysfunction that sacrifices patient care at the best of times. The COVID-19 pandemic will always be something I will remember, and there is such a long road ahead..
 
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thebigt

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All three men are in their 60’s. Unfortunately, I don’t know the exact answer to that question without doing some research. It seems as though if you are sick enough to be hospitalized for it, you are placed on hydroxychloro and azithromycin- unless pt has contraindications of course. I have been very busy keeping up with ever changing hospital protocols and those that are specific to my department, so I don’t know those specifics. It’s very hectic!

Thank you to everyone for your appreciation! All disciplines are really struggling with this, while hospital administration is treating us very poorly and keeps finding ways to make an already difficult situation even more stressful, inconvenient, and uncomfortable. They won’t get away with this much longer, they have to give something back or people are literally going to quit. I would say at least 40% of all staff has refused to work with COVID positive patients due to their own risk factors, older age, and some are just outright having panic attacks. While the working conditions are physically uncomfortable on many levels, I know that I can handle this- so I do it. I also have more experience managing complex ventilator scenarios than the majority of my co-workers.

It’s nice to see random companies stepping up and offering discounts to healthcare workers, free doughnuts, mentions of appreciation on the radio or TV. It helps to just to hear these things and inspires me to keep going through this very long week itself. After hearing about this virus for so many months, it’s a bit surreal to finally look these patients in the eyes and talk to them in person- and see how sick they really are. In a way, I feel privileged to be able to get involved and do my best to help them. I guess that’s why I got into healthcare in the first place, which becomes easy to forget amongst all the healthcare/hospital dysfunction that sacrifices patient care at the best of times. The COVID-19 pandemic will always be something I will remember, and there is such a long road ahead..
so many people get into healthcare for the wrong reasons, it is nice to hear from someone who got into healthcare because they genuinely care about people and want to help them....in all honesty some people in healthcare shouldn't be, in my honest opinion!!!!


thank you, @Ricky10
 
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Ricky10

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Just a little update here from what I have experienced at work for anyone interested:

I have been off for the past 2 days, which was a much needed rest which came just in time. I am back at it tomorrow, and volunteered to take the COVID positive unit. When I last worked in the unit 2 days ago, I still had my one ventilated patient, and another very nice man with CHF as a comorbidity that was on High Flow Oxygen. He struggled for 5 days in hopes that things would get better, but his inflammatory markers were on a steady rise. I was present with the covering pulmonologist (who is awesome) during many of the difficult conversations regarding when the pt wanted to make the decision to go on mechanical ventilation.

The pulmonologist explained to the pt that his labs are looking worse daily, and mechanical ventilation was imminent but the earlier it was initiated, the better his chances would be of survival. He gave the patient the choice of waiting and just hoping, or being placed on a ventilator and gave the patient a 60% chance of survival in that scenario. The patient subsequently agreed to me placed on the vent.

I remained in the room as I had to get all of the equipment ready for intubation, and setup the vent. Meanwhile, the pt called his family and said his “goodbyes“ in the event he does not survive. That was very sad. After the call, he asked me how I thought he would do. I like to promote positivity and positive thinking for my patients, but I honestly did have a gut feeling that he was going to make it out of this alive, and I told him that. I also assured him that he has a very committed team that will do all we can for him.

He is anticipated to be on the ventilator for approximately 1 week, and I look forward to seeing how he is doing tomorrow. Given the situation and everything he had already been through, I found myself with tears in my eyes when I drove home. I have never found myself getting that emotional throughout my 9 years in the profession.
 
BamBam54

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Good to hear the update from @Ricky10. Was going to post today to see how you were doing!
Ran across this news piece from CBS news that really hit home and had me thinking about how you were doing, and the sacrifices/struggles you all were going through in the medical community on the front lines.
If it hasn't been said already... or often enough... Thank you.
 
Renew1

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Just a little update here from what I have experienced at work for anyone interested:

I have been off for the past 2 days, which was a much needed rest which came just in time. I am back at it tomorrow, and volunteered to take the COVID positive unit. When I last worked in the unit 2 days ago, I still had my one ventilated patient, and another very nice man with CHF as a comorbidity that was on High Flow Oxygen. He struggled for 5 days in hopes that things would get better, but his inflammatory markers were on a steady rise. I was present with the covering pulmonologist (who is awesome) during many of the difficult conversations regarding when the pt wanted to make the decision to go on mechanical ventilation.

The pulmonologist explained to the pt that his labs are looking worse daily, and mechanical ventilation was imminent but the earlier it was initiated, the better his chances would be of survival. He gave the patient the choice of waiting and just hoping, or being placed on a ventilator and gave the patient a 60% chance of survival in that scenario. The patient subsequently agreed to me placed on the vent.

I remained in the room as I had to get all of the equipment ready for intubation, and setup the vent. Meanwhile, the pt called his family and said his “goodbyes“ in the event he does not survive. That was very sad. After the call, he asked me how I thought he would do. I like to promote positivity and positive thinking for my patients, but I honestly did have a gut feeling that he was going to make it out of this alive, and I told him that. I also assured him that he has a very committed team that will do all we can for him.

He is anticipated to be on the ventilator for approximately 1 week, and I look forward to seeing how he is doing tomorrow. Given the situation and everything he had already been through, I found myself with tears in my eyes when I drove home. I have never found myself getting that emotional throughout my 9 years in the profession.
Thank you for your update. I'm glad you got some rest.

I'm curious, why do you estimate 1 week on the ventilator? What do you expect to change by then, and why?
 

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Just a little update here from what I have experienced at work for anyone interested:

I have been off for the past 2 days, which was a much needed rest which came just in time. I am back at it tomorrow, and volunteered to take the COVID positive unit. When I last worked in the unit 2 days ago, I still had my one ventilated patient, and another very nice man with CHF as a comorbidity that was on High Flow Oxygen. He struggled for 5 days in hopes that things would get better, but his inflammatory markers were on a steady rise. I was present with the covering pulmonologist (who is awesome) during many of the difficult conversations regarding when the pt wanted to make the decision to go on mechanical ventilation.

The pulmonologist explained to the pt that his labs are looking worse daily, and mechanical ventilation was imminent but the earlier it was initiated, the better his chances would be of survival. He gave the patient the choice of waiting and just hoping, or being placed on a ventilator and gave the patient a 60% chance of survival in that scenario. The patient subsequently agreed to me placed on the vent.

I remained in the room as I had to get all of the equipment ready for intubation, and setup the vent. Meanwhile, the pt called his family and said his “goodbyes“ in the event he does not survive. That was very sad. After the call, he asked me how I thought he would do. I like to promote positivity and positive thinking for my patients, but I honestly did have a gut feeling that he was going to make it out of this alive, and I told him that. I also assured him that he has a very committed team that will do all we can for him.

He is anticipated to be on the ventilator for approximately 1 week, and I look forward to seeing how he is doing tomorrow. Given the situation and everything he had already been through, I found myself with tears in my eyes when I drove home. I have never found myself getting that emotional throughout my 9 years in the profession.

I'm sure we all have frustration and hard days in our respective work lives, but outside of being a deployed soldier/marine, I don't think anything can compare with the emotional stress you're talking about going through right now. We all bitch about dr's and the healthcare system in general, but I'm thankful for the professionals we have and I appreciate how hard you guys are working and how personal this is. As hard as it is to read and think about it, thank you for sharing this with us.
 
jswain34

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Does anybody recommend a brand or company with a not extremely expensive (like nowhere near rogue fitness prices) equipment that is quality? I mainly want a bench and dumbells but a trap bar with some plates would be great too.
Rep Fitness or Titan will get you some decent equipment for much cheaper than Rogue.
 
puccah8808

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Just a little update here from what I have experienced at work for anyone interested:

I have been off for the past 2 days, which was a much needed rest which came just in time. I am back at it tomorrow, and volunteered to take the COVID positive unit. When I last worked in the unit 2 days ago, I still had my one ventilated patient, and another very nice man with CHF as a comorbidity that was on High Flow Oxygen. He struggled for 5 days in hopes that things would get better, but his inflammatory markers were on a steady rise. I was present with the covering pulmonologist (who is awesome) during many of the difficult conversations regarding when the pt wanted to make the decision to go on mechanical ventilation.

The pulmonologist explained to the pt that his labs are looking worse daily, and mechanical ventilation was imminent but the earlier it was initiated, the better his chances would be of survival. He gave the patient the choice of waiting and just hoping, or being placed on a ventilator and gave the patient a 60% chance of survival in that scenario. The patient subsequently agreed to me placed on the vent.

I remained in the room as I had to get all of the equipment ready for intubation, and setup the vent. Meanwhile, the pt called his family and said his “goodbyes“ in the event he does not survive. That was very sad. After the call, he asked me how I thought he would do. I like to promote positivity and positive thinking for my patients, but I honestly did have a gut feeling that he was going to make it out of this alive, and I told him that. I also assured him that he has a very committed team that will do all we can for him.

He is anticipated to be on the ventilator for approximately 1 week, and I look forward to seeing how he is doing tomorrow. Given the situation and everything he had already been through, I found myself with tears in my eyes when I drove home. I have never found myself getting that emotional throughout my 9 years in the profession.
This is so heartbreaking. Thank you for sharing it with us. I was just telling my friend that I hope this situation humbles all of us a little bit. It really doesn’t give a crap if we’re rich, poor, or whatever...

I am still going to work every day while everyone is working remotely, but it doesn’t bother me. I’m just grateful I can still work.
 
puccah8808

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Just a little update here from what I have experienced at work for anyone interested:

I have been off for the past 2 days, which was a much needed rest which came just in time. I am back at it tomorrow, and volunteered to take the COVID positive unit. When I last worked in the unit 2 days ago, I still had my one ventilated patient, and another very nice man with CHF as a comorbidity that was on High Flow Oxygen. He struggled for 5 days in hopes that things would get better, but his inflammatory markers were on a steady rise. I was present with the covering pulmonologist (who is awesome) during many of the difficult conversations regarding when the pt wanted to make the decision to go on mechanical ventilation.

The pulmonologist explained to the pt that his labs are looking worse daily, and mechanical ventilation was imminent but the earlier it was initiated, the better his chances would be of survival. He gave the patient the choice of waiting and just hoping, or being placed on a ventilator and gave the patient a 60% chance of survival in that scenario. The patient subsequently agreed to me placed on the vent.

I remained in the room as I had to get all of the equipment ready for intubation, and setup the vent. Meanwhile, the pt called his family and said his “goodbyes“ in the event he does not survive. That was very sad. After the call, he asked me how I thought he would do. I like to promote positivity and positive thinking for my patients, but I honestly did have a gut feeling that he was going to make it out of this alive, and I told him that. I also assured him that he has a very committed team that will do all we can for him.

He is anticipated to be on the ventilator for approximately 1 week, and I look forward to seeing how he is doing tomorrow. Given the situation and everything he had already been through, I found myself with tears in my eyes when I drove home. I have never found myself getting that emotional throughout my 9 years in the profession.
This is so heartbreaking. Thank you for sharing it with us. I was just telling my friend that I hope this situation humbles all of us a little bit. It really doesn’t give a crap if we’re rich, poor, or whatever...

I am still going to work every day while everyone is working remotely, but it doesn’t bother me. I’m just grateful I can still work.
 
justhere4comm

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Just a little update here from what I have experienced at work for anyone interested:

I have been off for the past 2 days, which was a much needed rest which came just in time. I am back at it tomorrow, and volunteered to take the COVID positive unit. When I last worked in the unit 2 days ago, I still had my one ventilated patient, and another very nice man with CHF as a comorbidity that was on High Flow Oxygen. He struggled for 5 days in hopes that things would get better, but his inflammatory markers were on a steady rise. I was present with the covering pulmonologist (who is awesome) during many of the difficult conversations regarding when the pt wanted to make the decision to go on mechanical ventilation.

The pulmonologist explained to the pt that his labs are looking worse daily, and mechanical ventilation was imminent but the earlier it was initiated, the better his chances would be of survival. He gave the patient the choice of waiting and just hoping, or being placed on a ventilator and gave the patient a 60% chance of survival in that scenario. The patient subsequently agreed to me placed on the vent.

I remained in the room as I had to get all of the equipment ready for intubation, and setup the vent. Meanwhile, the pt called his family and said his “goodbyes“ in the event he does not survive. That was very sad. After the call, he asked me how I thought he would do. I like to promote positivity and positive thinking for my patients, but I honestly did have a gut feeling that he was going to make it out of this alive, and I told him that. I also assured him that he has a very committed team that will do all we can for him.

He is anticipated to be on the ventilator for approximately 1 week, and I look forward to seeing how he is doing tomorrow. Given the situation and everything he had already been through, I found myself with tears in my eyes when I drove home. I have never found myself getting that emotional throughout my 9 years in the profession.
My man, thank you for sharing.
You are amazing.

I shared with my wife.
-M
 
Ricky10

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Thank you for your update. I'm glad you got some rest.

I'm curious, why do you estimate 1 week on the ventilator? What do you expect to change by then, and why?
Thank you everyone!

1 week was the estimate given by the pulmonologist to the patient. What we wait for are inflammatory markers to come to a peak and then downtrend/stabilize. This is the process everyone goes through, but the time period differs from person to person, as well as severity. The other big player is the pt’s CHF condition, which had already been requiring the the use of IV diuretics due to the amount of fluids he has had to receive from being septic from his COVID infection.

He will need ongoing fluids while on the vent, and also diuretics (difficult balance) due to his CHF. This is fine, but the more diuretics are required, the more stress is put on the kidneys, and renal failure becomes a big problem. At that point, chances of survival becomes 20% with COVID ARDS (bilateral severe lung infection/pna), and subsequent renal failure. Avoiding renal failure will be a high priority.
 

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Just a little update here from what I have experienced at work for anyone interested:

I have been off for the past 2 days, which was a much needed rest which came just in time. I am back at it tomorrow, and volunteered to take the COVID positive unit. When I last worked in the unit 2 days ago, I still had my one ventilated patient, and another very nice man with CHF as a comorbidity that was on High Flow Oxygen. He struggled for 5 days in hopes that things would get better, but his inflammatory markers were on a steady rise. I was present with the covering pulmonologist (who is awesome) during many of the difficult conversations regarding when the pt wanted to make the decision to go on mechanical ventilation.

The pulmonologist explained to the pt that his labs are looking worse daily, and mechanical ventilation was imminent but the earlier it was initiated, the better his chances would be of survival. He gave the patient the choice of waiting and just hoping, or being placed on a ventilator and gave the patient a 60% chance of survival in that scenario. The patient subsequently agreed to me placed on the vent.

I remained in the room as I had to get all of the equipment ready for intubation, and setup the vent. Meanwhile, the pt called his family and said his “goodbyes“ in the event he does not survive. That was very sad. After the call, he asked me how I thought he would do. I like to promote positivity and positive thinking for my patients, but I honestly did have a gut feeling that he was going to make it out of this alive, and I told him that. I also assured him that he has a very committed team that will do all we can for him.

He is anticipated to be on the ventilator for approximately 1 week, and I look forward to seeing how he is doing tomorrow. Given the situation and everything he had already been through, I found myself with tears in my eyes when I drove home. I have never found myself getting that emotional throughout my 9 years in the profession.
I heard somewhere that a very high percentage of patients put on ventilators subsequently don’t make it (I believe Governor Cuomo said it in his briefing today). Can’t remember the percentage he quoted, but wanting to say it was staggeringly high like 80 percent or something. Could have just been applicable to New Your. What has been your experience at your hospital on how many patients make it after being placed on ventilators?
 
thebigt

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Just a little update here from what I have experienced at work for anyone interested:

I have been off for the past 2 days, which was a much needed rest which came just in time. I am back at it tomorrow, and volunteered to take the COVID positive unit. When I last worked in the unit 2 days ago, I still had my one ventilated patient, and another very nice man with CHF as a comorbidity that was on High Flow Oxygen. He struggled for 5 days in hopes that things would get better, but his inflammatory markers were on a steady rise. I was present with the covering pulmonologist (who is awesome) during many of the difficult conversations regarding when the pt wanted to make the decision to go on mechanical ventilation.

The pulmonologist explained to the pt that his labs are looking worse daily, and mechanical ventilation was imminent but the earlier it was initiated, the better his chances would be of survival. He gave the patient the choice of waiting and just hoping, or being placed on a ventilator and gave the patient a 60% chance of survival in that scenario. The patient subsequently agreed to me placed on the vent.

I remained in the room as I had to get all of the equipment ready for intubation, and setup the vent. Meanwhile, the pt called his family and said his “goodbyes“ in the event he does not survive. That was very sad. After the call, he asked me how I thought he would do. I like to promote positivity and positive thinking for my patients, but I honestly did have a gut feeling that he was going to make it out of this alive, and I told him that. I also assured him that he has a very committed team that will do all we can for him.

He is anticipated to be on the ventilator for approximately 1 week, and I look forward to seeing how he is doing tomorrow. Given the situation and everything he had already been through, I found myself with tears in my eyes when I drove home. I have never found myself getting that emotional throughout my 9 years in the profession.
rather you are a believer or not, saying a prayer for this man might make you feel a little better...I know when I pray for others I always get rewarded with a nice feeling...saying a prayer for you, Ricky.
 
Ricky10

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I heard somewhere that a very high percentage of patients put on ventilators subsequently don’t make it (I believe Governor Cuomo said it in his briefing today). Can’t remember the percentage he quoted, but wanting to say it was staggeringly high like 80 percent or something. Could have just been applicable to New Your. What has been your experience at your hospital on how many patients make it after being placed on ventilators?
We are in the very early stages here in Maine, far from being hotspot status. We were one if the last states to have a confirmed positive, but things will eventually catch up to us regardless. Today we have 344 positive cases in the state, and I could be walking into a very different unit any day in the next few weeks. As of now though, we have only had these 2 vented patients at my hospital, and they will both likely still be on when I go in tomorrow. Other hospitals in the state have more, but I am not aware of their exact data yet there have been 7 deaths statewide. We are doing pretty well as far as numbers so far..

So what I hear from my pulmonologists is data they get from Europe, and hotspots in the US. They are always researching! So they had also previously told me ”Once someone goes on a ventilator, the mortality rate is 80%.” I had this further clarified the last day I worked, and they explained it more thoroughly by saying:

Vented Covid ARDS as only problem- survival is 50%

Vented Covid ARDS with subsequent renal failure- survival is 20%

I suspect my latest patient was told 60% because he was not in renal failure yet, but he was at high risk for developing it.
 
Ricky10

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rather you are a believer or not, saying a prayer for this man might make you feel a little better...I know when I pray for others I always get rewarded with a nice feeling...saying a prayer for you, Ricky.
Yes, I told my GF all about this pt when I got home, she immediately asked me for his first name and said she wanted to pray for him. She is more religious than myself, as I am more of a “spiritual” person. I am praying for him though, and will be supporting him as much as I can. His family can’t be there to play that role in these circumstance. While vented patients are heavily sedated, we still believe they can hear us and that it makes a difference when we talk to them. I will be doing this for him...

I don’t feel the same level of attachment to my first vented patient because I never got to know him. I just walked in last Friday morning and I was called right up to the unit for the intubation. I have been giving him lots of attention nonetheless.
 
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I have a question for you @Ricky10 (or anybody else if you know). I’ve heard that surgical masks don’t prevent it’s used from being infected by COVID19. However I see many COVID19 unit health givers using these masks rather than N95/FFP2 ones. What’s your thought on that? Do you think the surgical masks protect their users adequately? To some extend?
 
HIT4ME

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I have a question for you @Ricky10 (or anybody else if you know). I’ve heard that surgical masks don’t prevent it’s used from being infected by COVID19. However I see many COVID19 unit health givers using these masks rather than N95/FFP2 ones. What’s your thought on that? Do you think the surgical masks protect their users adequately? To some extend?
I am not the person you asked, and not in the medical field, but here are my thoughts - they would be wearing N95 masks if they had them. But they don't so they are using the best they have and even a rag would be better than nothing.

My ultimate opinion is a mask of any sort has a few functions - not so much protecting you from inhaling particles if it is not N95 - but it does help prevent YOU, if you become infected, from dispersing particles. Obviously if I am a contact point with a sick patient I don't want to become a contact point for all other medical staff and patients.

Also, it will still protect the user from putting their hands near their nose and mouth, which should reduce infection to a degree. Is it great? No...but even a 20% reduction could be critical if that is the best you can do.

N95 is far better...if you have them.
 
ELROCK

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I am not the person you asked, and not in the medical field, but here are my thoughts - they would be wearing N95 masks if they had them. But they don't so they are using the best they have and even a rag would be better than nothing.

My ultimate opinion is a mask of any sort has a few functions - not so much protecting you from inhaling particles if it is not N95 - but it does help prevent YOU, if you become infected, from dispersing particles. Obviously if I am a contact point with a sick patient I don't want to become a contact point for all other medical staff and patients.

Also, it will still protect the user from putting their hands near their nose and mouth, which should reduce infection to a degree. Is it great? No...but even a 20% reduction could be critical if that is the best you can do.

N95 is far better...if you have them.
Correct.
 
thebigt

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Yes, I told my GF all about this pt when I got home, she immediately asked me for his first name and said she wanted to pray for him. She is more religious than myself, as I am more of a “spiritual” person. I am praying for him though, and will be supporting him as much as I can. His family can’t be there to play that role in these circumstance. While vented patients are heavily sedated, we still believe they can hear us and that it makes a difference when we talk to them. I will be doing this for him...

I don’t feel the same level of attachment to my first vented patient because I never got to know him. I just walked in last Friday morning and I was called right up to the unit for the intubation. I have been giving him lots of attention nonetheless.
I get a sort of high when I pray for people. it is sort of like donating to a worthy cause, the same kind of feel good effect.....never underestimate the power of prayer!!!

you are a good man, Ricky...GOD BLESS YOU, AND KEEP YOU SAFE.
 
Rostam

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I am not the person you asked, and not in the medical field, but here are my thoughts - they would be wearing N95 masks if they had them. But they don't so they are using the best they have and even a rag would be better than nothing.

My ultimate opinion is a mask of any sort has a few functions - not so much protecting you from inhaling particles if it is not N95 - but it does help prevent YOU, if you become infected, from dispersing particles. Obviously if I am a contact point with a sick patient I don't want to become a contact point for all other medical staff and patients.

Also, it will still protect the user from putting their hands near their nose and mouth, which should reduce infection to a degree. Is it great? No...but even a 20% reduction could be critical if that is the best you can do.

N95 is far better...if you have them.
This was also my opinion but I also so some study/paper (I can't neither remember nor find it again) saying that surgical masks are almost as effective as N95. And looking for this paper/study find another one saying that surgical mask is only 20% as effective.
 
HIT4ME

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This was also my opinion but I also so some study/paper (I can't neither remember nor find it again) saying that surgical masks are almost as effective as N95. And looking for this paper/study find another one saying that surgical mask is only 20% as effective.
lol - I just threw that 20% figure out there. Who needs a study I guess? Sometimes it's good just to be a lucky guesser :)
 
thebigt

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lol - I just threw that 20% figure out there. Who needs a study I guess? Sometimes it's good just to be a lucky guesser :)
much like meteorologists---educated guessers, lol.
 
HIT4ME

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Yeah but the other study that I can't find any more says AS EFFECTIVE AS N95 :)
Still, it was a wild-azzed guess that passed as an educated guess :)

Plus, I'll ignore the other study. Haven't you heard of confirmation bias?
 
BigGame84

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I feel like at this rate, gyms are never going to re-open again lol I was hoping for May 1st but now I'm thinking July 1st might be the best case scenario. I just think, especially here in the Northeast, you can't expect people to stay caged up for that long with the nicer weather right around the corner.
 

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I feel like at this rate, gyms are never going to re-open again lol I was hoping for May 1st but now I'm thinking July 1st might be the best case scenario. I just think, especially here in the Northeast, you can't expect people to stay caged up for that long with the nicer weather right around the corner.
my fear is that gyms will be one of the last to reopen. That and clubs/bars. Very hard to socially distance and lots of airborne droplets or surface touch points.

I noted China has locked down a region again and some places only reopened briefly.

obviously it’s killing my business but I won’t be surprised at September or later bro
 
BigGame84

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my fear is that gyms will be one of the last to reopen. That and clubs/bars. Very hard to socially distance and lots of airborne droplets or surface touch points.

I noted China has locked down a region again and some places only reopened briefly.

obviously it’s killing my business but I won’t be surprised at September or later bro
And then at the point, flu season starts back up again. How much longer will people put up with this. That is the question.
 

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And then at the point, flu season starts back up again. How much longer will people put up with this. That is the question.
well that is a fair point, there is definitely a consideration as to how long people will accept restrictions before all out anarchy occurs.
 
muscleupcrohn

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well that is a fair point, there is definitely a consideration as to how long people will accept restrictions before all out anarchy occurs.
It all depends how bad the virus spreads/gets. If somehow millions end up dead despite restrictions keeping people home, then fear may be a powerful motivator to keep most people indoors. But if the restrictions work as intended to flatten the curve, and the death rate and totals stay “low,” I can see people growing very restless over the course of several months.
 
BigGame84

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It all depends how bad the virus spreads/gets. If somehow millions end up dead despite restrictions keeping people home, then fear may be a powerful motivator to keep most people indoors. But if the restrictions work as intended to flatten the curve, and the death rate and totals stay “low,” I can see people growing very restless over the course of several months.
And besides people being restless, the economy is going to tank. That stimulus package is a joke. $1,200 is not enough for people. At some point soon, people need to get back to work.
 
justhere4comm

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Some will not get their $1200 until September per IRS article.
 

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We’ll be under martial law well before September rolls around, if we’re still under heavy restriction. $1200 wont last long at all and all hell will break loose.
 
HIT4ME

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I have had my LTC for 6+ years. I have never used it at all. Yesterday I picked up my first gun. The shop was practically sold out when I went and I was lucky to get what I did I think.
 
muscleupcrohn

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Thanks. So if they have your bank info for Direct Deposit, you’ll get it pretty soon. Then if not, they’ll get it to you sooner depending on how much you made. A bit sensational to use the September date though, as that seems to be the latest date, applicable only for people making close to $200k.

Edit: it says anyone making under $60k will get it by the end of May, and anyone making under $100k will get it by the end of June. Not great timing by any stretch of the imagination, but the September thing probably isn’t for people needing the money most, although financial situations can change quickly.
 
justhere4comm

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Shotgun.

It will take their head right off and leave little behind. If anyone is near them... pain.
I studied the Navy SEALs when I was in school. It's all about devastating the enemy fast.
Takes the will to fight right out of them.

Leave the body there for anyone else that has ideas.
Use their blood to pain a warning sign on the driveway.

I'm kidding.
Or am I?
No, just kidding.
Seriously.
 
HIT4ME

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Shotgun.

It will take their head right off and leave little behind. If anyone is near them... pain.
I studied the Navy SEALs when I was in school. It's all about devastating the enemy fast.
Takes the will to fight right out of them.

Leave the body there for anyone else that has ideas.
Use their blood to pain a warning sign on the driveway.

I'm kidding.
Or am I?
No, just kidding.
Seriously.
So a friend of mine is a gun smith and has like 100 weapons and 12,000 rounds. He told me to get a shotgun - good for home defense and you can also kill small animals for food in a bind. It is also leas likely to go through a wall into a neighbors yard or even house.

But...I went with a handgun. I figure in the event if a zombie apocalypse I will need to use my pistol to "trade up" for a shotgun.

But your post is great. Seriously.
 
muscleupcrohn

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So a friend of mine is a gun smith and has like 100 weapons and 12,000 rounds. He told me to get a shotgun - good for home defense and you can also kill small animals for food in a bind. It is also leas likely to go through a wall into a neighbors yard or even house.

But...I went with a handgun. I figure in the event if a zombie apocalypse I will need to use my pistol to "trade up" for a shotgun.

But your post is great. Seriously.
I’ve read a lot that shotguns and pistol-caliber carbines are solid options for home defense, as they can both limit over-penetration. Shotguns are solid options because of their ability to stop a threat quickly, and their affordability and reliability, while PCCs are solid due to their low recoil, ease of use (for people who a pump-action shotgun may be difficult), sufficient magazine capacity (where legally allowed), and better accuracy than a handgun, as well as better velocity too, due to a longer barrel.

People knock Hi-Point, but their 9mm carbine is actually quite reliable and accurate IME, and from some reliable and in-depth reviews I’ve read. Disassembly is a PITA, to the point I don’t think it’s even recommended to do on your own besides barrel cleaning lol (and I think it has a lifetime warranty?), so maybe not the best for long-term use if you think it’ll be a SHTF scenario, but a solid cheap option for what has been normal life. The Ruger PC carbine 9mm is a bit more expensive, but still under $500, can use Ruger mags or Glock mags with an adapter, and breaks apart into two pieces to make storage/traveling (legally, of course) with it much easier. Having a handgun and a carbine that share mags is a really nice thing to have too.
 

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