Your stats? What can you lift?

Megashark

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I am 34 years old and have been training for about ten months. I weigh 200, 6 feet tall and started smoking again recently (which I regret).

My max on bench is 205.(I feel like I should be able to do so much more at this point...)
With dumbbells, I can do 80s 3 times and 85s once.
Deadlift: 315
Military press..not sure, but I can get the 60 lb dumbbells up 3 times
Squat: No idea, I don't max out on legs. I just do 135 in sets of 10.

I feel like I'm behind the curve and it's discouraging but I am gonna stick with it. 5 months ago, I couldn't even bench the 65 dumbbells so I have def made progress
 
Cgkone

Cgkone

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I am 34 years old and have been training for about ten months. I weigh 200, 6 feet tall and started smoking again recently (which I regret).

My max on bench is 205.(I feel like I should be able to do so much more at this point...)
With dumbbells, I can do 80s 3 times and 85s once.
Deadlift: 315
Military press..not sure, but I can get the 60 lb dumbbells up 3 times
Squat: No idea, I don't max out on legs. I just do 135 in sets of 10.

I feel like I'm behind the curve and it's discouraging but I am gonna stick with it. 5 months ago, I couldn't even bench the 65 dumbbells so I have def made progress
So since you been lifting less than a year and you're interested in getting your numbers higher you probably should dedicate sometime into a linear progression program. Where you focus on trying to gain about 15 to 20 lb and at the same time try to add 5 to 10 lb on your big lifts every week. You should bench press and squat 5 sets of 5 on one day then maybe rest followed by military presses and deadlifts 5 sets of 5 followed by rest and then repeat. Every set should be perfect. Start with the weight for all lifts that you can easily do five sets of five. So if your max bench is 205 it's totally fine for you to start with something like 135 for 5 sets of 5.
There's a whole bunch of different variations and I'm sure a lot of other people will have plenty of good ideas for you also but that's a simple basic way to get stronger and it sounds like that's what you want to do
 
rob112

rob112

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Numbers need to be relative to you. I agree with above that you could do linear or 5/3/1 and make progress for awhile if numbers is what you chase.
 
Smont

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While your lifts are very low relative to your size, you been lifting less then a year. With a good program there's no reason you can't add 50 to 100 lb on your big lifts in 6 months to a year.
 
Hyde

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You don’t need to max your squat, or even any leg movement, to get stronger - but you do need to progress the numbers on them if you want to get stronger.

If you always squat 135x10 they will always be small, but if you can increase those sets of 10, or say increase a maximal 20-rep Set, you’ll be diggin’ where there’s taters my friend.
 
EMPIREMIND

EMPIREMIND

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These guys pretty much said it, but I will offer up a simple approach that is guaranteed to work if done right. Use a log book, or notes in your phone. Write all your workouts down, and each session aim to increase your reps or weight. If you are doing bench press 8-12 reps, you would start with a weight you can get for 8. Do not move past that weight until you get to 12 reps, then the next session increase the weight to bring you back into that 8 rep range. Continue like this EVERY session. If you cannot beat your log book, you need to adjust something, maybe how often your hitting that muscle group or your nutrition or your sleep. This holds you accountable and 100% works if you follow it. Progressive overload is key.
 

Diablodeadhead1880

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Do I have to post so much before I can make a topic? I can’t find the rules I just got the app!

I’m 6’0 240 coming back from a ripped pectoral and half ass Lilly gag training due to my job for 2 years. I’m back with 2 a day raining sessions! I used to be strong! Lol
 
Hyde

Hyde

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These guys pretty much said it, but I will offer up a simple approach that is guaranteed to work if done right. Use a log book, or notes in your phone. Write all your workouts down, and each session aim to increase your reps or weight. If you are doing bench press 8-12 reps, you would start with a weight you can get for 8. Do not move past that weight until you get to 12 reps, then the next session increase the weight to bring you back into that 8 rep range. Continue like this EVERY session. If you cannot beat your log book, you need to adjust something, maybe how often your hitting that muscle group or your nutrition or your sleep. This holds you accountable and 100% works if you follow it. Progressive overload is key.
I wish I could like this comment more than once
 

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