3500 Calories Extra Gain a Pound of Fat; What Needed to Gain a Pound of Muscle?

ucimigrate

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Hi Everyone,

When many doctors, etc. speak about weight, they speak about "fat". For instance, saying someone is over-weight usually means they are "overly fat."

How does muscle gain work exactly?


My guess is muscles are stimulated through resistance training, specifically satellite cell activation.

Then, protein is synthesized, assuming dietary intake is sufficient.

3. What is the rule for a pound of muscle gain? My guess is that two things must happen:

a. Calories must be sufficient, so there is enough glucose, etc. to not cause deamination and gluconeogenesis.

b. There must be ample protein in the diet.

4. Is it possible for genetically gifted people to be in a caloric deficit, and gain muscle while they gain fat?

5. Any actual scientific data and studies to back this?
 
aaronuconn

aaronuconn

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This is as simple or complex as you want to make it. But like your other threads, the answer exists if you google. If after doing independent research you still have questions, this is a great platform for asking, but these are some surface level questions that are easily searchable.
 

Jstrong20

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It is definatley possible to lean out and gain muscle. I have done it and so have others. I’ve taken many breaks off of lifting. One time it was probably close to a year. I leaned out and built muscle quickly thanks to muscle memory: anabolics will also help a lot of intentionally trying to recomp. Running rad 140 injectable and 4 Andro. Slight calorie surplus and I’m appearing leaner while growing. Actually surprised me because I’m already lean.
 

jrock645

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You need protein, energy(either from caloric surplus or from oxidized fat, meaning yes you can gain muscle and lose fat at the same time), and water to create muscle tissue once you have provided stimulus. That’s really the long and short of it.
 
Resolve10

Resolve10

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I think perusing places like NCBI and other journal areas would help you with searching for these kinds of things.

I'd caution trying to boil this down to specific numbers. While it can help for conceptualizing, these processes are way more involved and complicated than people like to make out so extrapolating specifics is more of a way to just get you in the right direction rather than for concrete action.
 

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