What's your current Post Workout meal?

machwon04

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Things have changed so much since I began seriously lifting and paying attention to my nutrition about 12 years ago. I've tried all the PWO carbs over the years (malto, dextrose, waxy maize etc) both mixed with my protein and consumed separately/prior to the protein. I've tried ground oats and a number of other things over the years. I find myself going for simplicity these days though, with work and a family and all. I've been downing an 8oz bottle of pure apple juice immediately post workout, then about 10-15 min later when I'm back at the office, I'll have about 3/4 cup of Nature Valley crunchy granola with added protein and about 30-35g hydrolyzed whey isolate shake in water. I'll follow that up an hour later with whatever I have for lunch that day: salad w/ grilled chicken or brown rice sushi rolls with salmon and usually a cup of greek yogurt are my normal go-to's.

So what does everyone else do now for PWO nutrition these days? Wondering if there's something new out there that people are doing these days.
 
AntM1564

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Depends what I'm in the mood for, but usually consists of:

Dannon Oikos Triple Zero Greek Yogurt
Dannon Light and Fit Greek
BJ's Plain Greek Yogurt
PB
Walnuts
Protein Powder
Chicken
Oatmeal
Fruit (always)
Cocoa Powder
Sweet Potatoes
Chia Seeds
Cereal
Pop Tarts
Rice Cakes
Granola Bars

Basically anything I have and want. I tend to save my "dirty" foods for post workout. Not for an insulin spike, but to reward myself after a hard training session.
 
smith_69

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Depends what I'm in the mood for, but usually consists of:

Dannon Oikos Triple Zero Greek Yogurt
Dannon Light and Fit Greek
BJ's Plain Greek Yogurt
PB
Walnuts
Protein Powder
Chicken
Oatmeal
Fruit (always)
Cocoa Powder
Sweet Potatoes
Chia Seeds
Cereal
Pop Tarts
Rice Cakes
Granola Bars

Basically anything I have and want. I tend to save my "dirty" foods for post workout. Not for an insulin spike, but to reward myself after a hard training session.
love the dannon- usually have the buy 3 - 4 packs for 10- blueberry but not the triple zero, but mmmm
 
smith_69

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Things have changed so much since I began seriously lifting and paying attention to my nutrition about 12 years ago. I've tried all the PWO carbs over the years (malto, dextrose, waxy maize etc) both mixed with my protein and consumed separately/prior to the protein. I've tried ground oats and a number of other things over the years. I find myself going for simplicity these days though, with work and a family and all. I've been downing an 8oz bottle of pure apple juice immediately post workout, then about 10-15 min later when I'm back at the office, I'll have about 3/4 cup of Nature Valley crunchy granola with added protein and about 30-35g hydrolyzed whey isolate shake in water. I'll follow that up an hour later with whatever I have for lunch that day: salad w/ grilled chicken or brown rice sushi rolls with salmon and usually a cup of greek yogurt are my normal go-to's.

So what does everyone else do now for PWO nutrition these days? Wondering if there's something new out there that people are doing these days.
waxy is absolute garbage- if you ever want a real post carb supplement- vitagro- genr8- believe they have a patent on the process. unflavored with whey and casein at night- or whey after a workout- that is the ultimate carb source. i have never used the flavors just plain and word of caution, you need a blender with genr8 if you use a thick protein.
 
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Couple recent ones lately:









 
Driven2lift

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Dinner, so varies a lot.

Generally a meat, veggies, potato kind of guy.
Lots of curry recently too
 
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God damn those all look delicious!

So have people moved away from the PWO carbs/protein powder drinks and more to whole food for PWO?
Who says you have to have a protein/carb drink after working out? You can easily go home and have a meal.


http://www.nsca.com/videos/conference_lectures/nutrient_timing_revisited/

When are Carbs and Protein VERY Important Post-workout?

Carbs:
- During leg Training + HIIT Cardio or doing a 2-3 hour intense workout session
Protein:
-Resistance Training in a fasted state (no meal consumed at least 3-4 hours prior)

When are Carbs and Protein of lesser importance Post-workout?

Carbs:
- 1-2 hour training session after a pre-workout meal (Small or mixed 2-3 hours prior to session)
Protein:
- Training after a meal composed of 20-40g Protein at least 1-2 hours prior to a workout in a fed state.

Overall Cliffs:

- Nutrient Timing can be beneficial but window of opportunity is not as big as believed
- Provided protein rich meal 3-4 hours prior to training, there is no stress about immediate post-workout protein supplement or meal
- Consume .4-.5g/kg of LBM in a pre/post workout exercise window spaced 4-6 hours depending on meal size.
- Post workout carb intake does not meaningful increase aabolicsm unless doing a 2 a day workout session involving same muscle groups. Glycogen is not a limting factor if you can consume enough Carbohydrates daily in the 24 hour period.
 

machwon04

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Who says you have to have a protein/carb drink after working out? You can easily go home and have a meal.


http://www.nsca.com/videos/conference_lectures/nutrient_timing_revisited/

When are Carbs and Protein VERY Important Post-workout?

Carbs:
- During leg Training + HIIT Cardio or doing a 2-3 hour intense workout session
Protein:
-Resistance Training in a fasted state (no meal consumed at least 3-4 hours prior)

When are Carbs and Protein of lesser importance Post-workout?

Carbs:
- 1-2 hour training session after a pre-workout meal (Small or mixed 2-3 hours prior to session)
Protein:
- Training after a meal composed of 20-40g Protein at least 1-2 hours prior to a workout in a fed state.

Overall Cliffs:

- Nutrient Timing can be beneficial but window of opportunity is not as big as believed
- Provided protein rich meal 3-4 hours prior to training, there is no stress about immediate post-workout protein supplement or meal
- Consume .4-.5g/kg of LBM in a pre/post workout exercise window spaced 4-6 hours depending on meal size.
- Post workout carb intake does not meaningful increase aabolicsm unless doing a 2 a day workout session involving same muscle groups. Glycogen is not a limting factor if you can consume enough Carbohydrates daily in the 24 hour period.
That was the general consensus for a LONG time - fast carbs and protein needed PWO for insulin spike etc. That's why I was asking though. It appears more recent research has proved otherwise.
 
Driven2lift

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That was the general consensus for a LONG time - fast carbs and protein needed PWO for insulin spike etc. That's why I was asking though. It appears more recent research has proved otherwise.
Correct, the only real concern it total macros hit daily, timing is relatively unimportant (exceptions for certain athletes, etc)
 
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That was the general consensus for a LONG time - fast carbs and protein needed PWO for insulin spike etc. That's why I was asking though. It appears more recent research has proved otherwise.
Correct
even Layne Norton debunked his own OLD research on needing to spike insulin or use nutrient voided carbs post-workout

"You do not need to neccessarily "spike" insulin for creatine to be maximally absorbed, but yes insulin is involved with the trasnsport.

FYI: The insulin and creatine studies I have seen up to this point have involved taking the glucose 30 minutes after the creatine. This may be because the insulin release from the dextrose doesn't entirely coincident with the pharmacokinetics of the creatine absorption.

Personally I think more consistent waves of insulin may be more anabolic than "spikes" anyway. This is because smoother waves of insulin more than likely affect ATP production more beneficially than "spikes" probably do. ATP is what rebuilds muscles and you want the most efficiency you can get here. I'm saying this because there is a delicate balance here between oxidative phosphorylation and lipogenesis (stimulated by acetyl COA carboxylase from HCO3-) in the mitochondrial in the presence of insulin. This "balance" I am talking about here is different for everyone though. Some people "shunt" over to lipgenesis so much sooner than other people. This has to do with other "global" processes happening in the body."

http://weightology.net/weightologyweekly/?page_id=319

The postexercise "anabolic window" is a highly misused & abused concept. Preworkout nutrition all but cancels the urgency, unless you're an endurance athlete with multiple glycogen-depleting events in a single day. Getting down to brass tacks, a relatively recent study (Power et al. 2009) showed that a 45g dose of whey protein isolate takes appx 50 minutes to cause blood AA levels to peak. Resulting insulin levels, which peaked at 40 minutes after ingestion, remained at elevations known to max out the inhibition of muscle protein breakdown (15-30 mU/L) for 120 minutes after ingestion. This dose takes 3 hours for insulin & AA levels to return to baseline from the point of ingestion. The inclusion of carbs to this dose would cause AA & insulinlevels to peak higher & stay elevated above baseline even longer.

So much for the anabolic peephole & the urgency to down AAs during your weight training workout; they are already seeping into circulation (& will continue to do so after your training bout is done). Even in the event that a preworkout meal is skipped, the anabolic effect of the postworkout meal is increased as a supercompensatory response (Deldicque et al, 2010). Moving on, another recent study (Staples et al, 2010) found that a substantial dose of carbohydrate (50g maltodextrin) added to 25g whey protein was unable to further increase postexercise net muscle protein balance compared to the protein dose without carbs. Again, this is not to say that adding carbs at this point is counterproductive, but it certainly doesn't support the idea that you must get your lightning-fast postexercise carb orgy for optimal results.

To add to this... Why has the majority of longer-term research failed to show any meaningful differences in nutrient timing relative to the resistance training bout? It's likely because the body is smarter than we give it credit for. Most people don't know that as a result of a single training bout, the receptivity of muscle to protein dosing can persist for at least 24 hours: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21289204

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15277409
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17617942

For most of us who train with an intra-workout BCAA or pre-workout meal there is stil food overlap as i touched in the other thread, do we need to spike insulin? absolutely not, food is still digesting, aminos are still present, so do we really need simple carbs post-workout not really..

Could they be optimal .. sure why not? but remember the total calories/macros if meeting your protein/fat/fiber minimums on a daily basis are optimal for your goal.

more:

he postexercise "anabolic window" is a highly misused & abused concept. Preworkout nutrition all but cancels the urgency, unless you're an endurance athlete with multiple glycogen-depleting events in a single day. Getting down to brass tacks, a relatively recent study (Power et al. 2009) showed that a 45g dose of whey protein isolate takes appx 50 minutes to cause blood AA levels to peak. Resulting insulin levels, which peaked at 40 minutes after ingestion, remained at elevations known to max out the inhibition of muscle protein breakdown (15-30 mU/L) for 120 minutes after ingestion. This dose takes 3 hours for insulin & AA levels to return to baseline from the point of ingestion. The inclusion of carbs to this dose would cause AA & insulin levels to peak higher & stay elevated above baseline even longer.

So much for the anabolic peephole & the urgency to down AAs during your weight training workout; they are already seeping into circulation (& will continue to do so after your training bout is done). Even in the event that a preworkout meal is skipped, the anabolic effect of the postworkout meal is increased as a supercompensatory response (Deldicque et al, 2010). Moving on, another recent study (Staples et al, 2010) found that a substantial dose of carbohydrate (50g maltodextrin) added to 25g whey protein was unable to further increase postexercise net muscle protein balance compared to the protein dose without carbs. Again, this is not to say that adding carbs at this point is counterproductive, but it certainly doesn't support the idea that you must get your lightning-fast postexercise carb orgy for optimal results.

To add to this... Why has the majority of longer-term research failed to show any meaningful differences in nutrient timing relative to the resistance training bout? It's likely because the body is smarter than we give it credit for. Most people don't know that as a result of a single training bout, the receptivity of muscle to protein dosing can persist for at least 24

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21289204

Here's what you're not seeming to grasp: the "windows" for taking advantage of nutrient timing are not little peepholes. They're more like bay windows of a mansion. You're ignoring just how long the anabolic effects are of a typical mixed meal. Depending on the size of a meal, it takes a good 1-2 hours for circulating substrate levels to peak, and it takes a good 3-6 hours (or more) for everythng to drop back down to baseline.

You're also ignoring the fact that the anabolic effects of a meal are maxed out at much lower levels than typical meals drive insulin & amino acids up to. Furthermore, you're also ignoring the body's ability of anabolic (& fat-oxidative) supercompensation when forced to work in the absence of fuels. So, metaphorically speaking, our physiology basically has the universe mapped out and you're thinking it needs to be taught addition & subtraction.
 
LovingtoLift

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Chicken breast, broccoli, and veggie quinoa or sweet potato.

Also love a nice spinach salad with fresh chicken breast, roasted peppers and diced sweet potato as well.
 
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Seems like Solution is saying thats not really a thing (assuming you haven't fasted up until the workout or something like that I guess).
Here is from Alan Aragon:

http://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-10-5

Due to the transient anabolic impact of a protein-rich meal and its potential synergy with the trained state, pre- and post-exercise meals should not be separated by more than approximately 3–4 hours, given a typical resistance training bout lasting 45–90 minutes. If protein is delivered within particularly large mixed-meals (which are inherently more anticatabolic), a case can be made for lengthening the interval to 5–6 hours. This strategy covers the hypothetical timing benefits while allowing significant flexibility in the length of the feeding windows before and after training. Specific timing within this general framework would vary depending on individual preference and tolerance, as well as exercise duration. One of many possible examples involving a 60-minute resistance training bout could have up to 90-minute feeding windows on both sides of the bout, given central placement between the meals. In contrast, bouts exceeding typical duration would default to shorter feeding windows if the 3–4 hour pre- to post-exercise meal interval is maintained. Shifting the training session closer to the pre- or post-exercise meal should be dictated by personal preference, tolerance, and lifestyle/scheduling constraints.

Even more so than with protein, carbohydrate dosage and timing relative to resistance training is a gray area lacking cohesive data to form concrete recommendations. It is tempting to recommend pre- and post-exercise carbohydrate doses that at least match or exceed the amounts of protein consumed in these meals. However, carbohydrate availability during and after exercise is of greater concern for endurance as opposed to strength or hypertrophy goals. Furthermore, the importance of co-ingesting post-exercise protein and carbohydrate has recently been challenged by studies examining the early recovery period, particularly when sufficient protein is provided. Koopman et al [52] found that after full-body resistance training, adding carbohydrate (0.15, or 0.6 g/kg/hr) to amply dosed casein hydrolysate (0.3 g/kg/hr) did not increase whole body protein balance during a 6-hour post-exercise recovery period compared to the protein-only treatment. Subsequently, Staples et al [53] reported that after lower-body resistance exercise (leg extensions), the increase in post-exercise muscle protein balance from ingesting 25 g whey isolate was not improved by an additional 50 g maltodextrin during a 3-hour recovery period. For the goal of maximizing rates of muscle gain, these findings support the broader objective of meeting total daily carbohydrate need instead of specifically timing its constituent doses. Collectively, these data indicate an increased potential for dietary flexibility while maintaining the pursuit of optimal timing.
 
anab0lix

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Here is from Alan Aragon:

http://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-10-5

Due to the transient anabolic impact of a protein-rich meal and its potential synergy with the trained state, pre- and post-exercise meals should not be separated by more than approximately 3–4 hours, given a typical resistance training bout lasting 45–90 minutes. If protein is delivered within particularly large mixed-meals (which are inherently more anticatabolic), a case can be made for lengthening the interval to 5–6 hours. This strategy covers the hypothetical timing benefits while allowing significant flexibility in the length of the feeding windows before and after training. Specific timing within this general framework would vary depending on individual preference and tolerance, as well as exercise duration. One of many possible examples involving a 60-minute resistance training bout could have up to 90-minute feeding windows on both sides of the bout, given central placement between the meals. In contrast, bouts exceeding typical duration would default to shorter feeding windows if the 3–4 hour pre- to post-exercise meal interval is maintained. Shifting the training session closer to the pre- or post-exercise meal should be dictated by personal preference, tolerance, and lifestyle/scheduling constraints.

Even more so than with protein, carbohydrate dosage and timing relative to resistance training is a gray area lacking cohesive data to form concrete recommendations. It is tempting to recommend pre- and post-exercise carbohydrate doses that at least match or exceed the amounts of protein consumed in these meals. However, carbohydrate availability during and after exercise is of greater concern for endurance as opposed to strength or hypertrophy goals. Furthermore, the importance of co-ingesting post-exercise protein and carbohydrate has recently been challenged by studies examining the early recovery period, particularly when sufficient protein is provided. Koopman et al [52] found that after full-body resistance training, adding carbohydrate (0.15, or 0.6 g/kg/hr) to amply dosed casein hydrolysate (0.3 g/kg/hr) did not increase whole body protein balance during a 6-hour post-exercise recovery period compared to the protein-only treatment. Subsequently, Staples et al [53] reported that after lower-body resistance exercise (leg extensions), the increase in post-exercise muscle protein balance from ingesting 25 g whey isolate was not improved by an additional 50 g maltodextrin during a 3-hour recovery period. For the goal of maximizing rates of muscle gain, these findings support the broader objective of meeting total daily carbohydrate need instead of specifically timing its constituent doses. Collectively, these data indicate an increased potential for dietary flexibility while maintaining the pursuit of optimal timing.
Had a long day and brain dead.

So for endurance athletes a high carb post workout shake/meal is more important than for one who is trying to gain strength/mass?
 
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Had a long day and brain dead.

So for endurance athletes a high carb post workout shake/meal is more important than for one who is trying to gain strength/mass?
Most people are fed pre-workout, there will be food overlapping into the post-workout period. The need for something instantly post-workout is a far stretch unless you are training 24+ hours fasted or training to be an endurnace athlete:

Here's what you're not seeming to grasp: the "windows" for taking advantage of nutrient timing are not little peepholes. They're more like bay windows of a mansion. You're ignoring just how long the anabolic effects are of a typical mixed meal. Depending on the size of a meal, it takes a good 1-2 hours for circulating substrate levels to peak, and it takes a good 3-6 hours (or more) for everythng to drop back down to baseline.

Not to mention some people eat a meal and then take an intra workout amino based beverage which is continually spiking muscle protein synthesis and never allowing it to reach baseline again. Constantly spiking amino levels is worse then allowing them to reach their base line and then have them spiked again

http://www.biolayne.com/wp-content/uploads/Norton-J-Ag-Food-Ind-Hi-Tech-2008.pdf
http://www.slideshare.net/biolayne/optimal-protein-intake-and-meal-frequency-to-support-maximal-protein-synthesis-and-muscle-mass
 

machwon04

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So you advocate NOT consuming BCAA's during a workout if you have eaten prior to training?
 
LovingtoLift

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I must admit I have learned that if you do eat a meal before you workout there is no need to waste your BCAA's. Just drink water. Now if you wake up in the morning and only eat a banana for example before the gym or work out fasted, then yes supplementation with BCAA's is a good choice.
 

machwon04

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My usual breakfast consists of about 30-35g protein, 20-25g fat, and maybe 10g carbs. I work out at 11am. Am I good to go without BCAA's intra then?
 
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My usual breakfast consists of about 30-35g protein, 20-25g fat, and maybe 10g carbs. I work out at 11am. Am I good to go without BCAA's intra then?
If you eat at like 8:30-9 and train at 11 your fine

Again from
Above

You're ignoring just how long the anabolic effects are of a typical mixed meal. Depending on the size of a meal, it takes a good 1-2 hours for circulating substrate levels to peak, and it takes a good 3-6 hours (or more) for everythng to drop back down to baseline.
 

machwon04

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If you eat at like 8:30-9 and train at 11 your fine

Again from
Above

You're ignoring just how long the anabolic effects are of a typical mixed meal. Depending on the size of a meal, it takes a good 1-2 hours for circulating substrate levels to peak, and it takes a good 3-6 hours (or more) for everythng to drop back down to baseline.
Oh, yea I left that out. Yea I eat between 8-8:30 most days. I was just wondering if what I eat is considered sizable enough to forgo the BCAA's intra workout.
 
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Oh, yea I left that out. Yea I eat between 8-8:30 most days. I was just wondering if what I eat is considered sizable enough to forgo the BCAA's intra workout.
You will be fine assuming you consume a beverage or meal Getting back from training
.

Try it for a week and see if you notice a difference
 
hvactech

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wendys triple classic burger and chili
 
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I don't have a "set meal"
but usually 5 oz of chicken few squirts siracha. 2 servings of Green beans, 1 serving of carrots and 1.5 servings of some type of cereal( life cinnamon, golden grahams, or lucky charms ) with 6oz of cashew milk
 
ManimalPatB

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6 oz of ground turkey
1 cup of jasmine rice
Asparagus

Covered in Hot Sauce and Mustard!!!!!
 
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I train 95% of the time in the AM before the sun is even up. Usually Post Workout its 1 cup of oats with 6 eggs. Sometimes I switch it up with grits and a splash of cheese.
 
hvactech

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today was 4 poptarts and 2 cup egg whites
 

machwon04

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Haha I can't tell when you @ssholes are joking half the time.
 

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poptarts are ****ing garbage nasty sugared cardboard o_O




Post workout for me varies sometimes its 6-8 eggs cooked lightly in duck fat served over grits with some P28 toast and cashew/walnut butter sometimes I also serve sliced rare AU Lamb seared in duck or goose fat next to it.





From yesterday topped with guava-habanero sauce ;)
 
hvactech

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BETTER THAN YOUR GLITTER DONUTS
 
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poptarts are ****ing garbage nasty sugared cardboard o_O




Post workout for me varies sometimes its 6-8 eggs cooked lightly in duck fat served over grits with some P28 toast and cashew/walnut butter sometimes I also serve sliced rare AU Lamb seared in duck or goose fat next to it.





From yesterday topped with guava-habanero sauce ;)
Dude.
Invite me over.
 
Tylerclee

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Hate to bump a thread but just seen it and I was wondering how yal feel about 20g of dextrose to halt cortisol and catabolism. Then eating a meal 30-45 minutes later
 

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