To Lat or not to Lat...something something

rob112

rob112

Well-known member
Awards
4
  • RockStar
  • Established
  • First Up Vote
  • Best Answer
I've noticed something today in powerlifters and their programming. You have two sides really:

A. American based powerlifting that involves working the lats constantly. The reason being is although not a primary mover, it is important to all lifts. I think we all know the reasons so I won't go into them. Makes sense.

B. programs based over seas where the thought is back work is of little importance. The best way to get good at squat/bench/dead is to squat/bench/dead, and often. Specificity is king. If you want to be good at a sport do sport specific movements. Makes sense.

I was wondering if any of AM posters have noticed this, how they feel about it, how they program the upper back, and why do they think it is such a variance? Also, both sides are very successful, so I won't say one is wrong, but is one given the edge other the other in any of your opinions.


No right or wrong answers, just curious if anyone here has any thoughts on this as I find it interesting.
 
Rodja

Rodja

Board Sponsor
Awards
3
  • RockStar
  • Legend!
  • Established
There's not a lot of similarities between the training philosophies of western and eastern countries in PL. Even the techniques taught are pretty different, especially when it comes to benching.

I personally am a huge proponent of heavy ass lat work at least twice per week.

Nice thought provoking topic, Rob.
 
rob112

rob112

Well-known member
Awards
4
  • RockStar
  • Established
  • First Up Vote
  • Best Answer
Interesting you both brought up benching. I was having a discussion with another powerlifter who big on lat development. He said all of the best benches come from Americans outside of a name or two be mentioned. He also said that that many over seas lifters lift sumo style as well. Which leads me to believe there thought muscularly is that quad development is the key factor.

I personally like the idea of it is such a large muscle group in the upper back that it should get some direct work, although sport specific training is top priority. I also, admittedly an very young in powerlifting years so I can't say "this worked like this for me, and this didn't."

Good stuff guys. Thanks for the input.
 

PaulBlack

Well-known member
Awards
2
  • RockStar
  • Established
I guess you could also liken it to curling. You don't need it (especially for certain lifts) but most guys still do 'em.
Ed Coan comes to mind too. He was a pretty great puller both sumo and conventional and would do rows with #450+ for reps.
Good enough for me.
Plus: waking away and looking like a gorilla from the back, helps with intimidation...!
Agree with you on back work and as Rodja said, not a bad topic or insight BigShot
 

kisaj

Well-known member
Awards
3
  • RockStar
  • Established
  • First Up Vote
I no longer PL, but I believed and still believe that lat work is enormously beneficial and it remains one of my favorite things to work.
 
rob112

rob112

Well-known member
Awards
4
  • RockStar
  • Established
  • First Up Vote
  • Best Answer
I guess you could also liken it to curling. You don't need it (especially for certain lifts) but most guys still do 'em.
Ed Coan comes to mind too. He was a pretty great puller both sumo and conventional and would do rows with #450+ for reps.
Good enough for me.
Plus: waking away and looking like a gorilla from the back, helps with intimidation...!
Agree with you on back work and as Rodja said, not a bad topic or insight BigShot
Ed is the GOAT so I think that is a fine reason haha

Thanks PB
 
bolt10

bolt10

Well-known member
Awards
2
  • RockStar
  • Established
Missed this earlier. It is very interesting and hope we can get more discussion.
 

Similar threads


Top