Overtraining Workouts at home?

madmike732

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Obviously all gyms are closed and were all trying to get our workouts at home. I have a pull up and dip station and a flat bench with dumbbells from 40-80lbs.
Ive been doing 100-200 pullups/chinups a day and about 300 pushups/day. And dumbbell benching every other day.
I feel great a little tight some mornings just wondering if doing pullups and pushups everyday is ineffective?
I do more calisthenics obviously cause i cant go to the gym. Just wondering if i am over-training or is it alright to do everyday,

Thanks fellas
 

jrock645

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I would only worry about it if your strength starts to decline.
 
Resolve10

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Honestly this is going to be dependent on the individual. What I could do versus you may be overtraining or not.

I'd treat home training the same as I would training in the gym, you should start lower in volume and build as you adapt to it.

Couple things to keep in mind, 100-200 is a huge difference. Start recording how many you do and then just build from whatever your baseline was. If you weren't doing a ton of pull ups before this then doing 100+ a day to start may be too much.

Next if you have DBs like that you can do so many different things, I wouldn't limit it to Pull Ups, Push Ups, and Bench. I'd toss in rows, leg exercises, etc, but I'd come up with a plan that builds properly.
 

madmike732

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Honestly this is going to be dependent on the individual. What I could do versus you may be overtraining or not.

I'd treat home training the same as I would training in the gym, you should start lower in volume and build as you adapt to it.

Couple things to keep in mind, 100-200 is a huge difference. Start recording how many you do and then just build from whatever your baseline was. If you weren't doing a ton of pull ups before this then doing 100+ a day to start may be too much.

Next if you have DBs like that you can do so many different things, I wouldn't limit it to Pull Ups, Push Ups, and Bench. I'd toss in rows, leg exercises, etc, but I'd come up with a plan that builds properly.
yea i didnt mean to put it like im only doing those exercises i just find myself doing them more. but yea ill definitely start to keep a log of my reps. thanks man
 

jrock645

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yea i didnt mean to put it like im only doing those exercises i just find myself doing them more. but yea ill definitely start to keep a log of my reps. thanks man
add some weight to your pullups, add bands to your pushups or use a backpack with some books in it or something. anything to make them more challenging and add some progressive quality to it rather than just doing more and more and more.
 

ucimigrate

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Very good. I actually think the bodyweight exercises are the core of strength.

Look at Marines in basic training. They are trying to be a fighting force. If they wanted, they could do barbell exercises, etc. But, they spend all their time running everywhere, doing pullups, pushups, crunches, calisthenics, burpees, etc. Simply because they work hard and cannot make excuses, they push through and get excellent results.
 

ucimigrate

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Very good. I actually think the bodyweight exercises are the core of strength.

Look at Marines in basic training. They are trying to be a fighting force. If they wanted, they could do barbell exercises, etc. But, they spend all their time running everywhere, doing pullups, pushups, crunches, calisthenics, burpees, etc. Simply because they work hard and cannot make excuses, they push through and get excellent results.
 

jrock645

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Very good. I actually think the bodyweight exercises are the core of strength.

Look at Marines in basic training. They are trying to be a fighting force. If they wanted, they could do barbell exercises, etc. But, they spend all their time running everywhere, doing pullups, pushups, crunches, calisthenics, burpees, etc. Simply because they work hard and cannot make excuses, they push through and get excellent results.
True but you gotta keep that in context. Theyre training for basic conditioning not aesthetics and peak strength. Theyre also training and evaluating 50 guys at a time. Thatd be almost impossible in a gym, itd be a whole lot harder anyway.
 

ucimigrate

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I agree. If you want to do bodybuilding, train, eat and live like a bodybuilder.

I am just saying that for general health and fitness, you cannot beat training such as Marine Corps basic training. While they are not as built up as bodybuilders, they are strong, muscular, cardiovascular fit, and flexible. When in doubt, do the tried and tested strategies, especially when these training programs have worked for longer than there have been bodybuilders, psychologists test the areas, and there is fallout if anything goes wrong.
 
muscleupcrohn

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Obviously all gyms are closed and were all trying to get our workouts at home. I have a pull up and dip station and a flat bench with dumbbells from 40-80lbs.
Ive been doing 100-200 pullups/chinups a day and about 300 pushups/day. And dumbbell benching every other day.
I feel great a little tight some mornings just wondering if doing pullups and pushups everyday is ineffective?
I do more calisthenics obviously cause i cant go to the gym. Just wondering if i am over-training or is it alright to do everyday,

Thanks fellas
As has been mentioned, if you're not regressing in terms of strength/performance and/or feeling like you're run-down, then you're not really/truly overtraining.

That said, you can actually do a lot with 40-80lb dumbbells. Even if 80s are light for normal sets of bench/incline presses (I have no idea how strong you are), you can always pre-exhaust your chest, or do supersets. I'm a big fan of, when I only have light dumbbells, supersetting flyes with presses, both for flat and incline. So, if I'd normally do incline bench press with 90-100lb dumbbells if I'm doing them fresh, I may instead do a set of incline flyes with 40lb dumbbells, and immediately superset it with incline presses with the same weight. I can go heavier on the flyes than if I did them later in the workout, and by the time I get to the presses, my chest is pre-exhausted, so even the weights that are less than half of what I'd normally use for presses feel heavy and I really hit the chest hard.

For shoulders, if I don't have heavy enough dumbbells to do presses (although 80s should be more than enough for shoulder presses; I know it is for me lol), you can superset dumbbell lateral or front raises with shoulder presses, or Arnold Presses if you really want to be able to get it done with lighter weights.

As for arms, well, you don't need much for arms; dumbells are plenty. Biceps you have curls, hammer curls, reverse grip curls, preacher curls, concentration curls, offset-grip curls, etc. For triceps you have overhead dumbbell extensions, lying dumbbell extensions (skullcrushers), dumbbell kickbacks, reverse grip or hammer grip dumbbell presses, dips, etc. You can superset biceps and triceps too if you want. Saves some time and gives a great pump.

Back you have pullups and chin ups, and you can always add weight to them to allow for more consistent progressive overload; maybe hold a dumbbell in your legs, or wear a backpack with some weights in it, etc. Then you have DB rows; 80lbs is pretty decent for rows, especially if you do them after pullups and chinups.

As has been mentioned, have a plan for progress/progression. Either add more weight each workout, or more reps, or more sets, or less rest, or a combination of the above.

If you're set on doing 100 pullups a workout, you can aim to get them done in less sets, or less rest between sets. Or you can aim to do 5-10 more pullups a workout. Or you can aim to do the same amount with 5lbs extra weight, etc. But you have to track your workouts to do this.
 

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