Is it worth taking probiotics if you don't have any gut issues?

Stanfoo

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As far as I know the main benefit of probiotic supplements is fixing gut issues.

I saw someone say it makes you feel better/increases overall well being, but I doubt that.

Experiences?
 

ironkill

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It can certainly increase overall well being depending on the strain. Specific strains can do various things so look for a strain that it's purported to improve whatever you're looking to improve (performance, well-being etc)
 
Darkhorse192

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It is not going to hurt, but it also depends on ensuring you get a good quality supplement. There are a lot of options out there, and a lot of them are companies just jumping on the "hey lets put out a probiotic" train. So ensuring it is a research-backed supp from a reputable company and is in your budget, it is not going to do any harm.

There is still a lot of unknowns when it comes to the whole gut microbiome thing, but more and more information is coming out saying that it is responsible for whole **** load more than just digestion.
 
Ape McGrapes

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The jury is still out on probiotics. The science is still too much in it's infancy. They may help, they may not. And then there is atleast one study that shows probiotic supplementation causing S.I.B.O.

If you choose to supplement probiotics, pick your own strains. Those specific to your issue. Research them. Most companies seem to take a kitchen sink approach and almost all blends look indistinguishable, and many underdosed per strain. Usually they try to sell you on high over all CFU count and large strain diversity. Unfortunately these blends are so "one size fits all" which is not so with probiotics, and may actually throw off your natural flora balance. Most probiotic blends also include prebiotics. Usually in the inferior form of F.O.S. While in theory these prebiotics should nourish healthy gut bacteria, they may also feed opportunistic bacteria that can lead to S.I.B.O. or simply overtake your good bacteria. There are better choices for prebiotics that are more selective in which bacteria they feed. G.O.S. comes to mind, but ultimately prebiotics aren't necessary.

A better approach would be to nerouish/modulate your gut biome and work with your natural flora balance. When I developed idiopathic slow transit IBS-C, I researched, purchased and supplemented the top strains shown to increase bowel transit time. Seperate or together I never noticed much of a difference. However over time I learned of other ways to nourish my gut biome through food and specific supplements: Green banana flour, kiwi, carrot salad, sodium butyrate, Epicor etc.

Before developing my digestive issues I tried several probiotic blends. Of course I was less knowledgeable then, but never saw a difference with or without there use.

YMMV
 
thebigt

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The jury is still out on probiotics. The science is still too much in it's infancy. They may help, they may not. And then there is atleast one study that shows probiotic supplementation causing S.I.B.O.

If you choose to supplement probiotics, pick your own strains. Those specific to your issue. Research them. Most companies seem to take a kitchen sink approach and almost all blends look indistinguishable, and many underdosed per strain. Usually they try to sell you on high over all CFU count and large strain diversity. Unfortunately these blends are so "one size fits all" which is not so with probiotics, and may actually throw off your natural flora balance. Most probiotic blends also include prebiotics. Usually in the inferior form of F.O.S. While in theory these prebiotics should nourish healthy gut bacteria, they may also feed opportunistic bacteria that can lead to S.I.B.O. or simply overtake your good bacteria. There are better choices for prebiotics that are more selective in which bacteria they feed. G.O.S. comes to mind, but ultimately prebiotics aren't necessary.

A better approach would be to nerouish/modulate your gut biome and work with your natural flora balance. When I developed idiopathic slow transit IBS-C, I researched, purchased and supplemented the top strains shown to increase bowel transit time. Seperate or together I never noticed much of a difference. However over time I learned of other ways to nourish my gut biome through food and specific supplements: Green banana flour, kiwi, carrot salad, sodium butyrate, Epicor etc.

Before developing my digestive issues I tried several probiotic blends. Of course I was less knowledgeable then, but never saw a difference with or without there use.

YMMV
wow-APE...this is one fine post!!!
 

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