Is It Possible To Be Too Strong?

ucimigrate

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I am trying to build up my strength.

Is it possible to ever be too strong?

1. I will do StrongLifts 5 x 5 to get stronger. Hopefully, I will never plateau.

2. Is it possible to ever be too strong?

My guess is everyone who cannot bench press 300 pounds or squat and deadlifts 400 pounds can do more. But, is there a reason not to?
 
Carnivorecon

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I am trying to build up my strength.

Is it possible to ever be too strong?

1. I will do StrongLifts 5 x 5 to get stronger. Hopefully, I will never plateau.

2. Is it possible to ever be too strong?

My guess is everyone who cannot bench press 300 pounds or squat and deadlifts 400 pounds can do more. But, is there a reason not to?
Only situation it could be bad in my opinion is if you had a strength imbalance, train your posterior chain as much as the front and keep your rotator cuffs in balance with your bench and shoulder press etc and you should be good
 
Resolve10

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No.

Longer answer, only if training for strength and what comes with that gets in the way of other benefits you may need as well. As you get stronger it takes more effort and time to train for more strength which could theoretically impede your ability to train for other things.

I wouldn't worry about it just keep training.
 

ucimigrate

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Thanks. I was just curious.

It seems like strength training is the absolute #1 priority for anybody. Whether to gain some muscle mass or lose fat, strength training is the priority.

I also agree that people should do lots of mobility exercises in-between sets, such as Athlean-X.

Many people are afraid of strength training will make us look like an Olympic Powerlifter, track and field strength athlete, or sumo wrestler. But, those people are not restricting calories or doing any sort of cardio. So, that is something.
 
Aleksandar37

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No
 

ucimigrate

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Although I am an amateur, I am prioritizing strength training now (such as Strong Lifts 5 X 5).

I have three worries:

1. I will plateau. I cannot imagine how people can do the Strong Lifts 5 X 5 and not plateau after six months doing the same exercises. Many experts believe in changing every 4-6 weeks.

2. That focusing on strength is a bad idea.

Power lifters, shot putters, etc. do not look very good. Then again, they do not competitively diet or do any cardio exercise; so, they cannot be compared to people like fitness models or bodybuilders.

3. In the past, I have done strength training but gotten injured, etc. I have very bad posture, weak core, anterior and lateral pelvic tilt.

In between the generous rest periods with strength training, I will do lots of mobility exercises, etc. to prioritize strength in core and movements, too.
 
The Solution

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3. In the past, I have done strength training but gotten injured, etc. I have very bad posture, weak core, anterior and lateral pelvic tilt.
Then this needs to be your primary concern.
Fix your posture.
Execute exercises with proper form and range of motion
Strengthen your core and learn proper bracing

If you do not do those things trying to add weight to the bar and beating the logbook won't always be your best course of action. Fix the underlying issue, and then when you go to progress in the gym everything will be firing on all cylinders. This way you can avoid injuries while trying to add strength and add weight to the bar.
 
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ericos_bob

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Although I am an amateur, I am prioritizing strength training now (such as Strong Lifts 5 X 5).

I have three worries:

1. I will plateau. I cannot imagine how people can do the Strong Lifts 5 X 5 and not plateau after six months doing the same exercises. Many experts believe in changing every 4-6 weeks.

2. That focusing on strength is a bad idea.

Power lifters, shot putters, etc. do not look very good. Then again, they do not competitively diet or do any cardio exercise; so, they cannot be compared to people like fitness models or bodybuilders.

3. In the past, I have done strength training but gotten injured, etc. I have very bad posture, weak core, anterior and lateral pelvic tilt.

In between the generous rest periods with strength training, I will do lots of mobility exercises, etc. to prioritize strength in core and movements, too.
Spend a session or two with a coach before you cement bad training habits. As you get stronger you'll risk severe injury if your form is not on point.

You can train for an emphasis on strength and look great, it all comes down to body fat. You'll always be stronger at a higher bodyfat % than you will shredded but that's no big trade off if you're not competing in power lifting. 5X5 is a great program and will take the average lifter a long way. There are plenty of strategies one can employ to break a plateau. Google 5x5 plateau and take your pick when you get to that point but I'd imagine you'll be able to build up to a good base 3/4/5 bench/squat/deadlift before you need to tweak anything.
 
Cheeky Monkey

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I remember a guy in my gym saying that he was progressing so fast on his lifts that he was starting to fear his own strength.
I wish I had his luck.
 
HIT4ME

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Then this needs to be your primary concern.
Fix your posture.
Execute exercises with proper form and range of motion
Strengthen your core and learn proper bracing

If you do not do those things trying to add weight to the bar and beating the logbook won't always be your best course of action. Fix the underlying issue, and then when you go to progress in the gym everything will be firing on all cylinders. This way you can avoid injuries while trying to add strength and add weight to the bar.
Spend a session or two with a coach before you cement bad training habits. As you get stronger you'll risk severe injury if your form is not on point.

You can train for an emphasis on strength and look great, it all comes down to body fat. You'll always be stronger at a higher bodyfat % than you will shredded but that's no big trade off if you're not competing in power lifting. 5X5 is a great program and will take the average lifter a long way. There are plenty of strategies one can employ to break a plateau. Google 5x5 plateau and take your pick when you get to that point but I'd imagine you'll be able to build up to a good base 3/4/5 bench/squat/deadlift before you need to tweak anything.
I am going to second/third these guys. Some of what I'm about to say may take some flack, but you don't hurt yourself lifting weights. You hurt yourself throwing and jerking weights, twisting, contorting, etc. If a weight is too heavy, you simply cannot lift it. If you cannot lift it, and you try to use another method to move it, you risk injury. For instance, pack on 1000 pounds onto a barbell on the floor. Now try to hurt yourself dead lifting it. (Ok, don't ACTUALLY try this - it's a thought experiment).

Focus on your issues first, get things right. Don't focus on how much weight you lift as much as HOW you lift it. Leave your ego at the door.

Now, to your original question, I originally thought, "Of course not. What is this foolishness?"

Then, it occurred to me...."Yeah, OK, maybe you could be too strong."

For instance, I believe I saw that Eddie Hall has a myostatin deficiency and he just broke a deadlifting record of something like 1100 or 1200 pounds. When he did this, he ruptured blood vessels and had nose bleeds, etc. Clearly he has built enough strength his body isn't really capable of handling the stress he can generate. Someone who could possibly go further may snap bones from their strength.

But is this anything that 99.9999% of us should worry about? Not even close. I mean, if you can deadlift 50-70% of that weight you will be in the top 1% by a long shot, and competitive with all but the most elite lifters. And do you have a "disease" that helps you pack on muscle, plus the dedication it took for him to get there (and the "supplements").

So, yeah, anything is possible. Is it likely? Exceedingly unlikely.
 
Cheeky Monkey

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If you think about it, we're not really designed to lift super heavyweight in general. Evolution has not designed our bodies for that purpose. We're meant to take a moderate amount of weight (30-60% of our body weight) and carry it over long distances. We're basically pack animals that walk on two legs but we can climb, swim, run, crawl etc.
 

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