IF Or Alternate Day Fasting vs Linear caloric Deficit/Dieting

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5680777/?fbcl****IwAR1nX8xEM4MdPy_RWJDC28IS8KdG-wVIo67azDuWcZr3rxkieX93Fd3RZbk

Depicted is the longest study to date on an alternate-day fasting (ADF) model which has been examined by Varady et al in shorter-term trials, showing consistently positive results. This trial compared ADF with conventional/linear dieting for a 6-month hypocaloric period followed by a 6-month maintenance period.

There were no significant differences between groups in bodyweight reduction, body composition change, blood pressure, heart rate, lipid profile, insulin sensitivity/glucose control, and inflammatory markers. Free full text is available in the following link, or just google the title of the study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5680777/

Take-home points... IF can be an effective means to control eating behavior by defaulting the dieter toward eating less by the end of the day or the week, depending on the IF variant. However, claims about IF’s superior effects on body composition or clinical/therapeutic effects compared to conventional linear dieting in the long-term are unfounded. The null differences seen in this study are consistent with systematic reviews and meta-analyses on this topic.

More explicitly: DIETERS HAVE THE FREEDOM AND FLEXIBILITY TO CHOOSE THE PROTOCOL THEY PERSONALLY PREFER AND CAN BEST ADHERE TO.
IF lacks scientific support for claims that it’s *the* superior option. If you prefer it, have at it. If you don’t, you’re not missing out on any magic.
 
ValiantThor08

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Good stuff!
 
Humble

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5680777/?fbcl****IwAR1nX8xEM4MdPy_RWJDC28IS8KdG-wVIo67azDuWcZr3rxkieX93Fd3RZbk

Depicted is the longest study to date on an alternate-day fasting (ADF) model which has been examined by Varady et al in shorter-term trials, showing consistently positive results. This trial compared ADF with conventional/linear dieting for a 6-month hypocaloric period followed by a 6-month maintenance period.

There were no significant differences between groups in bodyweight reduction, body composition change, blood pressure, heart rate, lipid profile, insulin sensitivity/glucose control, and inflammatory markers. Free full text is available in the following link, or just google the title of the study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5680777/

Take-home points... IF can be an effective means to control eating behavior by defaulting the dieter toward eating less by the end of the day or the week, depending on the IF variant. However, claims about IF’s superior effects on body composition or clinical/therapeutic effects compared to conventional linear dieting in the long-term are unfounded. The null differences seen in this study are consistent with systematic reviews and meta-analyses on this topic.

More explicitly: DIETERS HAVE THE FREEDOM AND FLEXIBILITY TO CHOOSE THE PROTOCOL THEY PERSONALLY PREFER AND CAN BEST ADHERE TO.
IF lacks scientific support for claims that it’s *the* superior option. If you prefer it, have at it. If you don’t, you’re not missing out on any magic.
Another study to add to the mix. It makes sense.

Thanks !
 
Bagofturdwind

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At first glance, my quibbles with this type of applied study is the lack of adherence by the alt-day fasting group. They ate more than they were supposed to on their “fast days” and didn’t eat as much as they were supposed to on feast days. They also didn’t follow any type of IF protocol on feast days. I hate the carb intake being so high in those macro requirements. I think the significantly heightened HDL in the alt-day fast group at the end of their weight loss period of 6 months is interesting. I know it goes back to baseline when they return to a maintenance diet, but the improved lipid levels during the dieting is intriguing, especially if an experimental group were to have metabolic syndrome. The fact that all of the participants had normal cholesterol levels and normal blood pressure before the study isn’t really useful in determining IF‘s potential to an at-risk population.

I’d love to see a similar study that recruits an at-risk population in regards to heart health and type II diabetes, have them actually fast during their fasting days, eat more during their feast days, lower that high carb intake, raise that low protein intake and extend it beyond 6 months. I agree this isn’t great for IF enthusiasts, but I believe there needs to be some more studies completed with improved protocol... thanks for sharing this
 

Whisky

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Really interesting- thanks for posting it
 

jmero2

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At first glance, my quibbles with this type of applied study is the lack of adherence by the alt-day fasting group. They ate more than they were supposed to on their “fast days” and didn’t eat as much as they were supposed to on feast days. They also didn’t follow any type of IF protocol on feast days. I hate the carb intake being so high in those macro requirements. I think the significantly heightened HDL in the alt-day fast group at the end of their weight loss period of 6 months is interesting. I know it goes back to baseline when they return to a maintenance diet, but the improved lipid levels during the dieting is intriguing, especially if an experimental group were to have metabolic syndrome. The fact that all of the participants had normal cholesterol levels and normal blood pressure before the study isn’t really useful in determining IF‘s potential to an at-risk population.

I’d love to see a similar study that recruits an at-risk population in regards to heart health and type II diabetes, have them actually fast during their fasting days, eat more during their feast days, lower that high carb intake, raise that low protein intake and extend it beyond 6 months. I agree this isn’t great for IF enthusiasts, but I believe there needs to be some more studies completed with improved protocol... thanks for sharing this
I can tell you from experience that my results with IF have been excellent. I think you hit the nail on the head, I'm a diabetic and have seen drastic reductions in my insulin resistance to the point that on my feast days, my post prandial numbers are extremely normal, Like in the lower 90's. I'm part of Jason Fung's IDM program and it hasn't been easy but very very effective.

I had a beta cell transplant in 2017 but I still exhibited high insulin resistance, IF has definitely helped in getting back to normal.
 
rochabp

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I agree I dont think IF is superior to "normal" dieting but it just works for me personally. I get all my stuff done and I get to take a bunch of yohimbine without worrying about food for 20 hours then eat 1 meal at the end of my day. Ill do this Monday through Friday and then eat normal Saturday Sunday.

Just pick something you can stick to, its that simple.
 

jmero2

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Absolutely. I ate the traditional 6 meals per day for 30 years and it worked for me, now I focus on my eating window. I have 2 to 3 meals currently and I'm still 177 around 11 percent bodyfat. I'm not looking to add bulk anymore but focus on getting this 48 year old body as ripped as possible.

It was hard to break the "I have to eat now" mentality but for the metabolicly challenged IF fits the bill.
 
BloodManor

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It will pretty much always be calories in vs calories out. Do what works for you because in the end you will get the same results.
 

kisaj

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I agree I dont think IF is superior to "normal" dieting but it just works for me personally. I get all my stuff done and I get to take a bunch of yohimbine without worrying about food for 20 hours then eat 1 meal at the end of my day. Ill do this Monday through Friday and then eat normal Saturday Sunday.

Just pick something you can stick to, its that simple.
This pretty much sums it up. I'd never be that guy that tries to act like one method of eating is superior to another if you are getting in calories and macros. But, IF works for me because it is so convenient and I don't have to stress over proper timing and number of meals. I spent SO many years sweating over this and making myself believe I was getting weaker or smaller because I missed my 7th meal or whatever.
 

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