Have We Had Definitive Studies of Protein Requirements?

ucimigrate

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Hi Everyone,

I know we have had debates, etc. about protein requirements.

Of key note is the difference between minimum effective dose, a satisfactory amount and maximum tolerable dose.

For example, a 150 lb man who is not weight lifting could get by with 50 grams of protein if he is not lifting weights, needs 150 grams of protein if he is lifting weights to build strength and muscle, could eat up to 200 grams of protein a day without ill health effects, and anything over 300 grams of protein would be too much under any circumstances.

I used simple calculations such as RDA, 1 gram per pound of bodyweight, etc.

All I can say is that a few simple rules seem to do well:

1. Try to space protein intake across the day; the more, the better. For example, 180 grams of protein in six meals a day is different than eating twice per day.

2. Protein at every meal is a good idea.

3. Animal proteins are usually superior than vegetable proteins. However, using vegetarian protein combining strategically can yield good results, too.

4. Whey protein is the best, especially before and after a workout.

5. The crucial times for protein use are: before a workout, after a workout (with carbohydrates), and before bed.

6. Keeping protein intake is high is a good idea for fat loss or muscle gain. But, make sure the big picture is all set first.

For example, is someone exercising well for their situation?

Is someone eating well, for their requirements?

7. Any studies, etc. that can prove any of this right or wrong?
 

SweetLou321

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Hi Everyone,

I know we have had debates, etc. about protein requirements.

Of key note is the difference between minimum effective dose, a satisfactory amount and maximum tolerable dose.

For example, a 150 lb man who is not weight lifting could get by with 50 grams of protein if he is not lifting weights, needs 150 grams of protein if he is lifting weights to build strength and muscle, could eat up to 200 grams of protein a day without ill health effects, and anything over 300 grams of protein would be too much under any circumstances.

I used simple calculations such as RDA, 1 gram per pound of bodyweight, etc.

All I can say is that a few simple rules seem to do well:

1. Try to space protein intake across the day; the more, the better. For example, 180 grams of protein in six meals a day is different than eating twice per day.

2. Protein at every meal is a good idea.

3. Animal proteins are usually superior than vegetable proteins. However, using vegetarian protein combining strategically can yield good results, too.

4. Whey protein is the best, especially before and after a workout.

5. The crucial times for protein use are: before a workout, after a workout (with carbohydrates), and before bed.

6. Keeping protein intake is high is a good idea for fat loss or muscle gain. But, make sure the big picture is all set first.

For example, is someone exercising well for their situation?

Is someone eating well, for their requirements?

7. Any studies, etc. that can prove any of this right or wrong?
I am gonna leave some notes below. I think you can look into studies yourself. You always ask for them but never use the information so I personally will not be doing this for you.

1. Try to space protein intake across the day; the more, the better. For example, 180 grams of protein in six meals a day is different than eating twice per day.

3 meals per day seems to be better then 1-2 meals per day with protein, it is theorized that 4-5 meals may be better then 3 but more research is needed. If eating at least 3 meals per day meets your eating preferences, this likely is close to optimal for muscle building purposes.

2. Protein at every meal is a good idea.

See above. You would likely see no difference eating 3 protein based meals per day with some other low protein snacks compared to 4 protein based meals.

3. Animal proteins are usually superior than vegetable proteins. However, using vegetarian protein combining strategically can yield good results, too.

Animal proteins seem to be best even when amino acid values are matched and more protein is provided to account for the lower bioavailability of most plant proteins.

4. Whey protein is the best, especially before and after a workout.

Whey probably best on paper, but in the real world, any animal based protein is fine pre and post workout. You wont notice a difference in results.

5. The crucial times for protein use are: before a workout, after a workout (with carbohydrates), and before bed.

Eating a few hours before and a few hours after a workout, regardless of carb intake is a good idea if it fits your schedule and preferences. Same with before bed. I wouldn't stress it too much.

6. Keeping protein intake is high is a good idea for fat loss or muscle gain. But, make sure the big picture is all set first.

1.6g protein per kg bw is a good minimum to aim for. More can be consumed if you prefer to eat it and if very lean going up to 3.1g protein per kg lbm may be a good idea. Eating around 3.4g protein per kg bw may impart better body composition effects.

For example, is someone exercising well for their situation?

Is someone eating well, for their requirements?

7. Any studies, etc. that can prove any of this right or wrong?

Read above, I am not doing the hard work for you.
 
aaronuconn

aaronuconn

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Read through the most accessed articles on The journal of the international society of sports nutrition


 

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