Alright, BCAAs..... Starting to go to the other side

MidWestJack

MidWestJack

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Hi yall,
Over the last year or so I've been contemplating my use of BCAAs and whether or not they are even beneficial. It seems monthly I come across a podcast, an article, friends, gym bros, someone making an argument that BCAAs are a waste of money. Now I've been taking MyProtein BCAAs for over 5 years, always intra-workout, post-workout I drink whey which also contains BCAAs.
This is how my brain works, ESPECIALLY on a cut, BCAAs are important due to the lack of calories, aiding you in muscle breakdown. This is starting to be the only reason I would consider continuing to buy BCAAs. Is that false to assume?

I recently came across a pretty interesting article that may have tipped the scale for me to the other side.

Im curious can anyone shed some light to dumb it down to me why I should continue supplementing BCAAs and who here swears by them
 
muscleupcrohn

muscleupcrohn

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Do you hit your daily target protein intake of at least 1.4-2.0 g/kg/lb bodyweight (ISSN Position Stand on Protein and Exercise)? Or perhaps more during a cut, if you want (may help preserve muscle mass if you go a little higher while cutting). Do you have a meal sufficient in protein within a few hours before and after your workouts? If you answered yes to all of those, you probably don't need them.
 
Potbelly

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Can’t shed any light just always thought it was a made up supplement fad. They seem to be running out of fads lately
 
thebigt

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Do you hit your daily target protein intake of at least 1.4-2.0 g/kg/lb bodyweight (ISSN Position Stand on Protein and Exercise)? Or perhaps more during a cut, if you want (may help preserve muscle mass if you go a little higher while cutting). Do you have a meal sufficient in protein within a few hours before and after your workouts? If you answered yes to all of those, you probably don't need them.
@muscleupcrohn good to see you back!!!
 
muscleupcrohn

muscleupcrohn

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If I didn't have a good pre-workout meal, and for some reason wasn't going to have a good post-workout meal (even within an hour or two post-workout), then I'd consider supplementing with EAAs. May as well get all the EAAs, not jus the BCAAs. 6-8g EAAs with at least 3g of that being leucine is ideal IMO in terms of EAA content. Definitely not a necessity for most people, but conditionally beneficial IMO.
 
The Solution

The Solution

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Good times to take BCAA's or EAA's:

When you are eating a meal that lacks leucine (Aim for 3g to maximize leucine threshold). Think a meal like beans or rice. Vegetarians may struggle with this

Between meals spaced 4-6 hours apart to stimulate MPS and allow protein levels to reach refractory stages.

I remember Layne Norton held a seminar at the Arnold Classic on this and his MPS powerpoint which showed research to back these statements.

But let's be 100% real. If you take a whey protein powder, and meet protein minimums (say 1g/lb) a day the need for additional aminos, BCAA's, EAA's, or free forms of protein would be minimal.

Also please dont sip on BCAA's all day as that has no net benefit because you are constantly elevating MPS consistently, which is actually counter productive.

Here is the PDF/Powerpoint:


The RDA for protein is 0.8 g/kg bodyweight however this may not be sufficient for athletes looking to maximize skeletal muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle mass. The amount of protein source required to maximize MPS is likely dependent upon its leucine content. Leucine is responsible for most of the anabolic effects of a meal and current research suggests that 3g (~0.05g/ kg bodyweight) of leucine is required to maximize this response. The MPS response to a mixed meal is only 3 hours long despite producing elevations in amino acids for 5 hours, thus athletes maximizing MPS will require inducing this response multiple times throughout the day. Consuming multiple meals per day containing 3g of leucine may be beneficial in maximizing MPS.
 

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