Help With Workout Routine and Diet

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    Help With Workout Routine and Diet


    I recently quit wrestling and since this have put on some weight not that I was that cut to begin with. I know how to lose weight like a wrestler which is very unhealthy and to be honest is not helping me with the situation I'm in. My girlfriend is studying abroad and comes back May 29th I would like to be skinny and cut by then please help!

    Workout Routine:
    -Morning Lift
    Bench 3 sets to failure at 135,155,175 medium and wide grip
    Bench 3 sets to failure at 135 close grip
    Tricep Extensions 3x10 70lb DB
    Curls 3x10 35lb DB
    Shoulder Press 3 sets to failure at 90lbs
    Run 1 mile
    P90X Abs
    -Night Lift
    Clean and press 5x6 at 165 and 175
    Squats 3 sets to failure at 135
    Box Jumps 4x50
    Swim 50 Down backs in Olympic size pool(sorry don't know the technical term)
    Abs

    Diet:
    -Breakfast
    Apple(2)
    Soy milk(1 glass)
    -Snack
    1/2 soy protein 1/2 whey protein shake with skim milk
    -Lunch
    Stir Fry
    + Broccoli(1/4 cup)
    + Red and Green Peppers(1/2 cup)
    + Mushrooms(1/2 cup)
    + Kidney, Pinto, and Black Beans(1/2 cup)
    + Black Olives(1/4 cup)
    Cottage Cheese(1 cup)
    water(1 glass)
    1/2 Powerade 1/2 Water(1 glass)
    -Snack
    Chicken Salad
    +Chicken(1/2 cup)
    +Lettuce(a lot)
    Soy milk(1 glass)
    -Dinner
    Wheat wrap
    + Turkey(1 cup)
    + Banana Peppers(1/2 cup)
    + Red Peppers(1/2 cup)
    + Pickles(1/4 cup)
    + Pepper jack cheese(1 slice)
    Banana(1)
    Sweet green tea(2 glasses)
    *Also I take NO Explode before my night workout and Nitric Oxide(N.O. Fury) pills when I wake up.

    I tried to be as close to the amounts as possible. I want to know if this is a healthy eating and workout plan because I started the plan two weeks ago and lost eight pounds this week. I want to lose weight and get alot more cut but I want it to be sustainable without discomfort. Also since starting this plan I can't seem to stop snacking on carrots and drinking water is this healthy or am I starving myself. Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.

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    Man you need to up the protein....Breakfast especially. Maybe throw in some Turkey Sausage or Turk Bacon or PB with the apple to start! Lots more coming I'm sure. Start with a good bfast. It's key to success.
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    I try to eat my fruits and proteins at different meals because a powerlifter told me that fruit has something in it that can block the digestion of protein. Is this true or not? Also, I am wary of taking in too much protein as I always seem to gain more fat when I do; I only eat chicken and turkey for protein.
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    Actually, fruit has enzymes in it that may improve protein digestion...especially pineapple.
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    Protein requires pepsin for digestion. Acid fruits like pineapple , oranges, and tomatoes can destroy the pepsin.
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    The pH of your stomach is far more acidic than any fruit you can eat. When the stomach empties into the small intestine the pancreas secrete bicarbonate which neutralize stomach acid, raises the pH, and allows enzymes to function optimally. Thus, fruits will not disturb the functions of pepsin.

    Br
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    Although pepsin requires acid to function, pepsin IS destroyed by excessive acid(caused by acidic foods). It works in the stomach to convert protein to aminos. Anything not broken down by the time it exits the stomach ain't going to. Just trying to help a man out but you go ahead and mix your OJ and protein, I don't care.
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    The pH of stomach acids is far lower than the pH of any fruits or fruit juices.

    Pepsin is active in the proteolysis of protein substrates over a pH range
    extending from below 2 to above 4 and has optimum activity for most proteins at
    about pH 1.8
    - Northrop, J. H. (1922-3). J. gen. Physiol. 5, 263

    It is apparent that there was no clearly defined optimum pH for
    the digestion of a-protein, a-casein or C-I assay protein, for the rate of digestion
    progressively decreased as the pH was raised from 1.3 to 3.7.
    The ideal pH for whey digestion was pH 1.7-1.8
    - Kratzer & Porter, 1962. The effect of pH on the digestion of proteins in vitro by pepsin. British Journal of Nutrition. PMID: 14035534

    Orange juice has a pH of about 3.5 to 4. Therefore, OJ is not going to prevent pepsin from digesting proteins. And I challenge you to show me some research showing OJ and other acid foods reduce pepsin activity.

    Further..you state that:
    Anything not broken down by the time it exits the stomach ain't going to.
    This is totally inaccurate. First off, digestion continues throughout the small intestine. Following gastic empyting chyme is mixed pancreated juices, which contain a whole host of enzymes that further break down proteins into amino acids and polypeptides (keep in mind, only amino acids and very short polypeptides are small enough to be absorbed by intestinal epithelial cells). Trypsin, chymotripsin, and carboxypetidase all work to break down polypeptides into amino acids where they can be absorbed.

    Br
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    I'm a RN studing to be a CRNA and along with a metric $hit ton of pharm books , I was required to read Functional Biochemistry in Health and Disease. The book was a 2009 or 2010 copy(i really tried to find an 80 year old article like yours). The answers to all your questions and challenges are in it. I'm just too busy to look it up and keep this up. I did a quick search on google and did come up with an article about oj and protein. livestrong.com/article/545595-orange-juice-for-your-digestion/ . The writer is a PhD student in food science. I'm done with this, like I said , do it however it suites you.
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    I'm a 1/2 semester away from earning a PhD in exercise physiology. I'm also an adjunct professor of human biology, and I have published articles in medical journals...not livestrong.

    The article you referenced does not say anything about the effects of acidity on pepsin. Further, here's a quote from the article which goes is contrary to everything you have just said:

    Common treatments for poor digestion include dietary modification, taking antacids for symptomatic relief, supplementing with digestive enzymes and trying to naturally lower stomach pH during meals.
    And....

    Natural fruit acids prevent carbohydrate digestion
    - Not protein digestion.

    Maybe you should go back and re-read your text book.

    The digestive system has not changed over the past 100, or every 100,000 years. There's a reason there aren't many recent studies regarding the effect of pH on pepsin or the pH of a healthy human stomach...its because it was discovered 20-80 years ago, and it hasn't changed since.

    Br
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    Because you are hard pressed to find recent studies looking at just pepsin activity at varying pH...

    Digestion. 2002;65(2):73-81.

    Physiological study of pH stability and sensitivity to pepsin of human gastric lipase.

    Ville E, Carrière F, Renou C, Laugier R.
    Source

    La Timone Hospital, Gastroenterology Department, Marseille, France.

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND/AIMS:

    The aim of this study was to exactly determine the pH stability of human gastric lipase (HGL) and to investigate the mechanism underlying the inactivation of HGL which occurs in gastric juice.
    METHODS:

    Samples of human gastric juice and purified HGL were incubated at various pH values ranging from 0.5 to 8.0, and the residual HGL activity was measured as a function of time using the pHstat technique. Samples of purified HGL were also incubated in the presence of human pepsin. Electrophoresis and Western blot analysis were performed on all the samples in which HGL was inactivated.
    RESULTS:

    HGL was found to be stable in gastric juice at pH values ranging from 2.0 to 7.0, especially between pH 3.0 and 5.0 (half-inactivation time >24 h). HGL activity decreased rapidly below pH 2.0 and above pH 7.0. The inactivation half times were only 43 +/- 9 and 24 +/- 18 min at pH 1 and pH 8, respectively. The pH stability of purified HGL was much lower than that of HGL in gastric juice. Acid or alkaline inactivation of HGL could occur without any prior proteolytic degradation, and this inactivation was irreversible. However, proteolytic degradation of HGL by pepsin also occurred at very low pH values, probably because the acid-denatured HGL is more sensitive to proteolytic cleavage by pepsin. An ex vivo study of HGL activity in several gastric juice samples showed that the HGL activity decreased with the pH of the sample, in both basal and pentagastrin-stimulated gastric juice.

    CONCLUSION:

    Although HGL is not as stable as it was previously thought to be under acidic conditions, it is nevertheless the most stable acid lipase and constitutes a good candidate tool for enzyme substitution therapy.
    Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

    So, we see pepsin is very active at low pH in a recent study...

    I still challenge you to find me research that acidic foods such as citrus fruits DESTROY pepsin in the human stomach.

    Br
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    Wasn't looking for recent articles that prove my point, I have those ,was looking for really old ones like you cited. Your last post has to do with HGL and pepsins effect on it. Hgl digest lipids not proteins. You challenged me to find an article about oj and protein and I did. Now another assignment from the adjunct prof, ... No thanks.
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    Basic biochemistry here. HGL is an enzyme. Enzymes are proteins constructed of polypeptide chains. The reason I posted the abstract was to further my point with recent research as you questioned classical research that pepsin digests protein (HGL) at a very low pH. Whats next...are you going to challenge some of the work by Newton, Hooke or Einstein because it was performed over 10-20 years ago?

    I specifically challenged you this..quoting directly from my previous post:

    And I challenge you to show me some research showing OJ and other acid foods reduce pepsin activity.
    ... Not OJ and protein.

    In case you didn't know....this is the way an intelligent discussion on this forum works: Make a statement, provide evidence to back it up.

    You opened the door regarding education and credentials. I simply followed suit hoping that you would see me as an equal who can understand and critique peer reviewed scientific/medical literature.

    Now, you made a statement. You have yet to provide a shred of evidence that backs it up.

    Not only did you make a claim, but you attempted to insult me. You are either too proud to admit you made a mistake, or you do not have any scientific evidence to show that pepsin is deactivated or destroyed by the acidity of fruits.

    Br
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    Sorry, your right and I'm wrong. Is that what you wanted to hear?
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