Going to the Doctor's; What Should Be Done? - AnabolicMinds.com

Going to the Doctor's; What Should Be Done?

  1. Banned
    AmericnMuscle's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  215 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    88
    Rep Power
    0

    Reputation

    Going to the Doctor's; What Should Be Done?


    I'm in my early 20's and am waiting on my new health insurance to become active. I haven't had a primary care physician, or even a physical in several years. I've done one hormonal cycle before (Havoc by RPN) and used appropriate on- and off-cycle supplements. I do plan on getting a physical done, including blood work and an STD/HIV test. But is there anything else that I should request? I'm wanting to get my health completely in check before hitting the gym again and beginning my Sustanon 250 cycle. Also, has anyone ever confided steroid use in their doctor, or are doctors required by some law to report such a thing to the authorities?

  2. BPS
    BPS is offline
    New Member
    BPS's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  210 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    20
    Rep Power
    77

    Reputation

    I would definitely look into get an extensive blood test done, checking levels of everything you can think of.
  3. Banned
    AmericnMuscle's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  215 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    88
    Rep Power
    0

    Reputation

    I'm getting a checkup for my general health, but also plan on getting pre, during and post-cycle tests done whenever I run a cycle.

    I'm gonna try requesting a full hormone panel. I will be getting my liver function, lipids (cholesterol), testosterone and complete blood count tested. Am I missing anything? I'd like to cover all bases.
    •   
       

  4. BPS
    BPS is offline
    New Member
    BPS's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  210 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    20
    Rep Power
    77

    Reputation

    Kidneys
  5. Banned
    AmericnMuscle's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  215 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    88
    Rep Power
    0

    Reputation

    Quote Originally Posted by BPS View Post
    Kidneys
    Aha, thanks.
  6. New Member
    Cinn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Age
    29
    Posts
    184
    Rep Power
    453

    Reputation

    Quote Originally Posted by BPS View Post
    Kidneys
    There's no reason for him to get an RFT unless kidney disease is suspected.
  7. BPS
    BPS is offline
    New Member
    BPS's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  210 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    20
    Rep Power
    77

    Reputation

    Well with my blood work, renal is in it anyway.
  8. Professional Member
    hardknock's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  185 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,202
    Rep Power
    18665

    Reputation

    renal should be in there. I'm talking basic kidney function not a specific renal test..

    cbc
    lipids
    free/total test
    E2
    PSA levels if you can convince your doc that you have a family hisotory of prostate issues

    stress test also

    Unless you have a very close relationship with your doc, don't mention the roids. They have to report why you requested those test if something is suspected by the insurance co.
    They will send you a paper requesting permission to get specific info from your doc. If they find that you use non prescript medications then you may very well be seen as a high risk and they could drop you or deny claim pay .... this has happened to 2 friends of mine and one other guy, who I know at my local work.
  9. BPS
    BPS is offline
    New Member
    BPS's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  210 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    20
    Rep Power
    77

    Reputation

    Here is a good write up I found:


    Glucose: This is the chief source of energy for all living organisms. A level greater than 105 in someone who has fasted for 12 hours suggests a diabetic tendency. If this level is elevated even in a non-fasting setting one must be concerned that there is a risk for developing diabetes. This is an incredibly powerful test and can predict diabetes ten years or more before one develops the strict definition of diabetes which is levels greater than 120.

    Sodium: This element plays an important role in salt and water balance in your body. A low level in the blood can be caused by too much water intake, heart failure, or kidney failure. A low level can also be caused by loss of sodium in diarrhea, fluid or vomiting. A high level can be caused by too much intake of salt or by not enough intake of water.

    Potassium and Magnesium: These elements are found primarily inside the cells of the body. Low levels in the blood may indicate severe diarrhea, alcoholism, or excessive use of water pills. A very low level of magnesium in the blood can cause your muscles to tremble. Low potassium levels can cause muscle weakness and heart problems.

    Chloride: Is an electrolyte controlled by the kidneys and can sometimes be affected by diet. An electrolyte is involved in maintaining acid-base balance and helps to regulate blood volume and artery pressure. Elevated levels are related to acidosis as well as too much water crossing the cell membrane.

    BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen): BUN is a waste product derived from protein breakdown in the liver. Increases can be caused by excessive protein intake, kidney damage, certain drugs, low fluid intake, intestinal bleeding, exercise, heart failure or decreased digestive enzyme production by the pancreas. Decreased levels are most commonly due to inadequate protein intake, malabsorption, or liver damage.

    Creatinine: Creatinine is also a protein breakdown product. Its level is a reflection of the bodies muscle mass. Low levels are commonly seen in inadequate protein intake, liver disease, kidney damage or pregnancy. Elevated levels are generally reflective of kidney damage and need to be monitored very carefully.

    Uric Acid: Uric acid is the end product purine metabolism. High levels are seen in gout, infections, high protein diets, and kidney disease. Low levels generally indicate protein and molybdenum (trace mineral) deficiency, liver damage or an overly acid kidney.

    Phosphate: Phosphate is closely associated with calcium in bone development. Therefore most of the phosphate in the body is found in the bones. But the phosphate level in the blood is very important for muscle and nerve function. Very low levels of phosphate in the blood can be associated with starvation or malnutrition and this can lead to muscle weakness. High levels in the blood are usually associated with kidney disease. However the blood must be drawn carefully as improper handling may falsely increase the reading.

    Calcium: Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. It is involved in bone metabolism, protein absorption, fat transfer, muscular contraction, transmission of nerve impulses, blood clotting, and heart function. It is highly sensitive to elements such as magnesium, iron, and phosphorous as well as hormonal activity, vitamin D levels, CO2 levels and many drugs. Diet, or even the presence of calcium in the diet has a lot to do with "calcium balance" - how much calcium you take in and how much you lose from your body.

    Albumin: The most abundant protein in the blood, it is made in the liver and is an antioxidant that protects your tissues from free radicals. It binds waste products, toxins and dangerous drugs that might damage the body. Is also is a major buffer in the body and plays a role in controlling the precise amount of water in our tissues. It serves to transport vitamins, minerals and hormones. The higher this number is, the better. The highest one can reasonably expect would be 5.5.

    Alkaline Phosphatase: Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme that is found in all body tissue, but the most important sites are bone, liver, bile ducts and the gut. A high level of alkaline phosphatase in your blood may indicate bone, liver or bile duct disease. Certain drugs may also cause high levels. Growing children, because of bone growth, normally have a higher level than adults do. Low levels indicate low functioning adrenal glands, protein deficiency, malnutrition or more commonly, a deficiency in zinc.

    Transaminases (SGTP) & (SGOT): These are enzymes that are primarily found in the liver. Drinking too much alcohol, certain drugs, liver disease and bile duct disease can cause high levels in the blood. Hepatitis is another problem that can raise these levels. Low levels of GGTP may indicate a magnesium deficiency. Low levels of SGPT and SGOT may indicate deficiency of vitamin B6.

    Gamma-Glutamyltranserase (GGTP): Believed to be involved in the transport of amino acids into cells as well as glutathione metabolism. Found in the liver and will rise with alcohol use, liver disease, or excess magnesium. Decreased levels can be found in hypothyroidism and more commonly decreased magnesium levels.

    Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH): LDH is an enzyme found in all tissues in the body. A high level in the blood can result from a number of different diseases. Also, slightly elevated levels in the blood are common and usually do not indicate disease. The most common sources of LDH are the heart, liver, muscles, and red blood cells.

    Total Protein: This is a measure of the total amount of protein in your blood. A low or high total protein does not indicate a specific disease, but it does indicate that some additional tests may be required to determine if there is a problem.

    Iron: The body must have iron to make hemoglobin and to help transfer oxygen to the muscle. If the body is low in iron, all body cells, particularly muscles in adults and brain cells in children, do not function up to par. If this test is low you should consider getting a Ferritin test, especially if you are a female who still has menstrual cycles.

    Triglycerides: These are fats used as fuel by the body, and as an energy source for metabolism. Increased levels are almost always a sign of too much carbohydrate intake. Decreased levels are seen in hyperthyroidism, malnutrition and malabsorption.

    Cholesterol: Group of fats vital to cell membranes, nerve fibers and bile salts, and a necessary precursor for the sex hormones. High levels indicate diet high in carbohydrates/sugars. Low levels indicate low fat diet, malabsorption, or carbohydrate sensitivity.

    HDL/LDL: LDL is the "bad cholesterol", which carries cholesterol for cell building needs, but leaves behind any excess on artery walls and in tissues. HDL is the "good cholesterol" which helps to prevent narrowing of the artery walls by removing the excess cholesterol and transporting it to the liver for excretion. A low HDL percentage frequently indicates diets high in refined carbohydrates and/or carbohydrate sensitivity.

    CO2: The CO2 level is related to the respiratory exchange of carbon dioxide in the lungs and is part of the bodies buffering system. Generally, when used with the other electrolytes, carbon dioxide levels indicate pH or acid/alkaline balance in the tissues. This is one of the most important tests that we measure. Most people have too much acid in their body. If you garden you will know that it is very difficult to grow plants in soil where the pH is incorrect. Our blood is similar to soil in many respects and it will be difficult to be healthy if our body's pH is not well balanced.

    WBC: White blood count measures the total number of white blood cells in a given volume of blood. Since WBCs kill bacteria, this count is a measure of the body's response to infection.

    Hemoglobin: Hemoglobin provides the main transport of oxygen and carbon in the blood. It is composed of "globin", a group of amino acids that form a protein and "heme", which contains iron. It is an important determinant of anemia (decreased hemoglobin) or poor diet/nutrition or malabsorption.

    Hematocrit: Hematocrit is the measurement of the percentage of red blood cells in whole blood. It is an important determinant of anemia (decreased), dehydration (elevated) or possible overhydration (decreased).

    MCV: Thismeasures the average size of the red blood cells and their volume. These components together can indicate iron deficiency anemia (decreased), B12/folate deficiency anemia (increased), or rheumatoid arthritis (decreased).

    LAB VALUES

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Normal Lab Values


    HEMATOLOGY
    Red Blood Cells
    RBC (Male) 4.2 - 5.6 M/L
    RBC (Female) 3.8 - 5.1 M/L
    RBC (Child) 3.5 - 5.0 M/L
    White Blood Cells
    WBC (Male) 3.8 - 11.0 K / mm cubed
    WBC (Female) 3.8 - 11.0 K / mm cubed
    WBC (Child) 5.0 - 10.0 K / mm cubed
    Hemoglobin
    Hgb (Male) 14 - 18 g/dL
    Hgb (Female) 11 - 16 g/dL
    Hgb (child) 10 - 14 g/dL
    Hgb (Newborn) 15 - 25 g/dL
    Hematocrit
    Hct (Male) 39 - 54%
    Hct (Female) 34 - 47%
    Hct (Child) 30 - 42%
    MCV 78 - 98 fL
    MCH 27 - 35 pg
    MCHC 31 - 37%
    Neutrophils 50 - 81%
    Bands 1 - 5%
    Lymphocytes 14 - 44%
    Monocytes 2 - 6%
    Eosinophils 1 - 5%
    Basophils 0 - 1%


    CARDIAC MARKERS
    Troponin I 0 - 0.1 ng/ml (onset: 4-6 hrs, peak: 12-24 hrs, return to normal: 4-7 days)
    Troponin T 0 - 0.2 ng/ml (onset: 3-4 hrs, peak: 10-24 hrs, return to normal: 10-14 days)
    Myoglobin (Male) 10 - 95 ng/ml (onset: 1-3 hrs, peak: 6-10 hrs, return to normal: 12-24 hrs)
    Myoglobin (Female) 10 - 65 ng/ml (onset: 1-3 hrs, peak: 6-10 hrs, return to normal: 12-24 hrs)

    GENERAL CHEMISTRY
    Acetone 0.3 - 2.0 mg%
    Albumin 3.5 - 5.0 gm/dL
    Alkaline Phosphatase 32 - 110 U/L
    Anion gap 5 - 16 mEq/L
    Ammonia 11 - 35 mol/L
    Amylase 50 - 150 U/dL
    AST, SGOT (Male) 7 - 21 U/L
    AST, SGOT (Female) 6 - 18 U/L
    Bilirubin, Direct 0.0 - 0.4 mg/dL
    Bilirubin, Indirect total minus direct
    Bilirubin, Total 0.2 - 1.4 mg/dL
    BUN 6 - 23 mg/dL
    Calcium (total) 8 - 11 mg/dL
    Carbon dioxide 21 - 34 mEq/L
    Carbon monoxide symptoms at greater than or equal to 10% saturation
    Chloride 96 - 112 mEq/L
    Creatine (Male) 0.2 - 0.6 mg/dL
    Creatine (Female) 0.6 - 1.0 mg/dL
    Creatinine 0.6 - 1.5 mg/dL
    Ethanol 0 mg%; Coma: greater than or equal to 400 - 500 mg%
    Folic acid 2.0 - 21 ng/mL
    Glucose 70 - 110 mg/dL (diuresis greater than or equal to 180 mg/dL)
    HDL (Male) 25 - 65 mg/dL
    HDL (Female) 38 - 94 mg/dL
    Iron 52 - 169 g/dL
    Iron binding capacity 246 - 455 g/dL
    Lactic acid 0.4 - 2.3 mEq/L
    Lactate 0.3 - 2.3 mEq/L
    Lipase 10 - 140 U/L
    Magnesium 1.5 - 2.5 mg/dL
    Osmolarity 276 - 295 mOsm/kg
    Parathyroid hormone 12 - 68 pg/mL
    Phosphorus 2.2 - 4.8 mg/dL
    Potasssium 3.5 - 5.5 mEq/L
    Protein (total) 6.0 - 9.0 gm/dL
    SGPT 8 - 32 U/L
    Sodium 135 - 148 mEq/L
    T3 0.8 - 1.1 g/dL
    Thyroglobulin Less than 55 ng/mL
    Thyroxine (T4) total 5 - 13 g/dL
    Total protein 5 - 9 gm/dL
    TSH Less than 9 U/mL
    Urea nitrogen 8 - 25 mg/dL
    Uric acid (Male) 3.5 - 7.7 mg/dL
    Uric acid (Female) 2.5 - 6.6 mg/dL

    LIPID PANEL (ADULT)
    Cholesterol (total) Less than 200 mg/dL desirable
    Cholesterol (HDL) 30 - 75 mg/dL
    Cholesterol (LDL) Less than 130 mg/dL desirable
    Triglycerides (Male) Greater than 40 - 170 mg/dL
    Triglycerides (Female) Greater than 35 - 135 mg/dL

    URINE
    Color Straw
    Specific Gravity 1.003 - 1.040
    pH 4.6 - 8.0
    Na 10 - 40 mEq/L
    K Less than 8 mEq/L
    Cl Less than 8 mEq/L
    Protein 1 - 15 mg/dL
    Osmolality 80 - 1300 mOsm/L

    24 HOUR URINE
    Amylase 250 - 1100 IU / 24 hr
    Calcium 100 - 250 mg / 24 hr
    Chloride 110 - 250 mEq / 24 hr
    Creatinine 1 - 2 g / 24 hr
    Creatine Clearance (Male) 100 - 140 mL / min
    Creatine Clearance (Male) 16 - 26 mg / kg / 24 hr
    Creatine Clearance (Female) 80 - 130 mL / min
    Creatine Clearance (Female) 10 - 20 mg / kg / 24 hr
    Magnesium 6 - 9 mEq / 24 hr
    Osmolality 450 - 900 mOsm / kg
    Phosphorus 0.9 - 1.3 g / 24 hr
    Potassium 35 - 85 mEq / 24 hr
    Protein 0 - 150 mg / 24 hr
    Sodium 30 - 280 mEq / 24 hr
    Urea nitrogen 10 - 22 gm / 24 hr
    Uric acid 240 - 755 mg / 24 hr

    COAGULATION
    ACT 90 - 130 seconds
    APTT 21 - 35 seconds
    Platelets 140,000 - 450,000 / ml
    Plasminogen 62 - 130%
    PT 10 - 14 seconds
    PTT 32 - 45 seconds
    FSP Less than 10 g/dL
    Fibrinogen 160 - 450 mg/dL
    Bleeding time 3 - 7 minutes
    Thrombin time 11 - 15 seconds

    CEREBRAL SPINAL FLUID
    Appearance clear
    Glucose 40 - 85 mg/dL
    Osmolality 290 - 298 mOsm/L
    Pressure 70 - 180 mm/H2O
    Protein 15 - 45 mg/dL
    Total cell count 0 - 5 cells
    WBC's 0 - 6 / L

    HEMODYNAMIC PARAMETERS
    Cardiac Index 2.5 - 4.2 L / min / m squared
    Cardiac Output 4 - 8 LPM
    Left Ventricular Stroke Work Index 40 - 70 g / m squared / beat
    Mean Arterial Pressure 70 - 105 mm Hg
    Pulmonary Vascular Resistance 155 - 255 dynes / sec / cm to the negative 5
    Pulmonary Vaslular Resistance Index 255 - 285 dynes / sec / cm to the negative 5
    Right Ventricular Stroke Work Index 7 - 12 g / m squared / beat
    Stroke Volume 60 - 100 mL / beat
    Stroke Volume Index 40 - 85 mL / m squared / beat
    Systemic Vascular Resistance 900 - 1600 dynes / sec / cm to the negative 5
    Systemic Vascular Resistance Index 1970 - 2390 dynes / sec / cm to the negative 5
    Systolic Arterial Pressure 90 - 140 mm Hg
    Diastolic Arterial Pressure 60 - 90 mm Hg
    Central Venous Pressure 2 - 6 mm Hg; 2.5 - 12 cm H2O
    Ejection Fraction 60 - 75%
    Left Arterial Pressure 4 - 12 mm Hg
    Pulmonary Artery Systolic 15 - 30 mm Hg
    Pulmonary Artery Diastolic 5 - 15 mm Hg
    Pulmonary Artery Pressure 10 - 20 mm Hg
    Pulmonary Artery Wedge Pressure 4 - 12 mm Hg
    Pulmonary Artery End Diastolic Pressure 8 - 10 mm Hg
    Right Atrial Pressure 4 - 6 mm Hg
    Right Ventricular End Diastolic Pressure 0 - 8 mm Hg

    NEUROLOGICAL VALUES
    Cerebral Perfusion Pressure 70 - 90 mm Hg
    Intracranial Pressure 5 - 15 mm Hg or 5 - 10 cm H2O

    ARTERIAL VALUES
    pH 7.35 - 7.45
    PaCO2 35 - 45 mm Hg
    HCO3 22 - 26 mEq/L
    O2 sat 92 - 100%
    PaO2 80 - 100 mm Hg
    BE -2 to +2 mmol/L

    VENOUS VALUES
    pH 7.31 - 7.41
    PaCO2 41 - 51 mm Hg
    HCO3 22 - 29 mEq/L
    O2 sat 60 - 85%
    PaO2 30 - 40 mm Hg
    BE 0 to +4 mmol/L

    Hormone / antagonist Life stage Value
    Progesterone (nanograms per milliliter or nano-moles per liter) < 1.0 ng/ml
    (< 3.18 nmol/L)
    17-Hydroxyprogesterone (nanograms per deciliter or nano-moles per liter) 5 –250 ng/dl
    ( 0.15 –7.5 nmol/L)
    Estradiol (picograms per milliliter or pico-moles per liter) < 60 pg/ml
    (< 185 pmol/L)
    FSH (units per liter) 1.0 –12.0 U/L

    LH (units per liter)
    2.0 –14.0 U/L
    SHBG (nano-moles per liter) 6–50 nmol/L
    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) (nanograms per deciliter or nano-moles per liter) 180 –1250 ng/dl
    ( 6.24 –43.3 nmol/L)
    Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) (micrograms per deciliter) 10 –619 g/dl
    Androstenedione (nanograms per milliliter) 0.8-2 ng/ml
    Androstenediol (nanograms per milliliter) 0.2-2 ng/ml
    Total testosterone - morning sample (nanograms per deciliter or nano-moles per liter) 270 –1070 ng/dl
    (9.36 –37.10 nmol/L)
    Free testosterone - morning sample (picrograms per milliliter or pico-moles per liter) 20 –40 yr 15.0 –40.0 pg/ml (520 –1387 pmol/L)
    41 –60 yr 13.0 –35.0 pg/ml (451 –1213 pmol/L)
    61 –80 yr 12.0 –28.0 pg/ml (416 –971 pmol/L)
    Prolactin (nanograms per milliliter) 0 –15 ng/ml
  10. Professional Member
    hardknock's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  185 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,202
    Rep Power
    18665

    Reputation

    ^^^^^^^^^Nice find.....

    Only thing the op has to remember is that those numbers may not necessarily translate into the same numbers which his lab may use. My labs rankings are totally different than the numbers posted above, yet, they mean the same.
    ---The internet is the father of the electronic lynch-mob---
  11. BPS
    BPS is offline
    New Member
    BPS's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  210 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    20
    Rep Power
    77

    Reputation

    Very good point, thanks for catching that side of things.
  12. New Member
    Cinn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Age
    29
    Posts
    184
    Rep Power
    453

    Reputation

    Quote Originally Posted by hardknock View Post
    renal should be in there. I'm talking basic kidney function not a specific renal test..
    So then what are you referring to since you are the second person to say this? Most kidney function markers are not effected until there is severe kidney damage. Are you suggesting he get a chem panel? Urinalysis? 24hr urine creatinine?

    People should be leery about medical advice from others that aren't so clear.
  13. Banned
    AmericnMuscle's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  215 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    88
    Rep Power
    0

    Reputation

    Quote Originally Posted by hardknock View Post
    renal should be in there. I'm talking basic kidney function not a specific renal test..

    cbc
    lipids
    free/total test
    E2
    PSA levels if you can convince your doc that you have a family hisotory of prostate issues

    stress test also

    Unless you have a very close relationship with your doc, don't mention the roids. They have to report why you requested those test if something is suspected by the insurance co.
    They will send you a paper requesting permission to get specific info from your doc. If they find that you use non prescript medications then you may very well be seen as a high risk and they could drop you or deny claim pay .... this has happened to 2 friends of mine and one other guy, who I know at my local work.
    I'll get the following tested;

    cbc
    lipids
    free/total test
    E2
    PSA levels

    Should this cover everything?

    What exactly is a 'stress test'?

    It should be rather easy to convince any doctor that I'd like different tests done because I don't know much about my family history.
  14. Banned
    AmericnMuscle's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  215 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    88
    Rep Power
    0

    Reputation

    Quote Originally Posted by hardknock View Post
    ^^^^^^^^^Nice find.....

    Only thing the op has to remember is that those numbers may not necessarily translate into the same numbers which his lab may use. My labs rankings are totally different than the numbers posted above, yet, they mean the same.
    I agree. Great find! That information could also be very useful to others on the forum. This will help if my doctor/lab uses the same ranking system, but, if not, then that still is impressive. Thanks!
  15. New Member
    Cinn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Age
    29
    Posts
    184
    Rep Power
    453

    Reputation

    Quote Originally Posted by AmericnMuscle View Post
    I'll get the following tested;

    cbc
    lipids
    free/total test
    E2
    PSA levels

    Should this cover everything?

    What exactly is a 'stress test'?

    It should be rather easy to convince any doctor that I'd like different tests done because I don't know much about my family history.
    You could throw in a thyroid panel if you want and skip out on the PSA.
  16. BPS
    BPS is offline
    New Member
    BPS's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  210 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    20
    Rep Power
    77

    Reputation

    What do you think about a TSH test?
  17. New Member
    Mazderati's Avatar
    Stats
    4'6"  900 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    25
    Rep Power
    137

    Reputation

    I believe the renal analysis important given the typically higher protein consumption of people who lift weights, as higher protein intake generally creates more work for the renal system. Add to this the consumption of creatine, very low carbohydrate intake, or very low fat intake, and the kidneys are being asked to do a lot. Sodium is easy to eat and also calls for extra renal work, so that is a consideration as well. Having the test done certainly can't hurt anything. If nothing else, it would provide baseline numbers for any future problems.

    Doctor-patient privilege and confidentiality (there is a distinct difference) often depend on who is paying for the visit. If your new insurance company is paying for the tests before they are giving you coverage, I would have as little work performed as possible. In this case, the doctor is a pseudo employee of the insurance company and there may not be any privilege or confidentiality at all. However, if you go and see the doctor on your own terms, whether you are filing with an insurance company or not, privilege and confidentiality should exist. You have to check state law if you want to be absolutely sure.

    Someone I know confided in their doctor about potentially taking steroids. The patient asked their physician if regular bloodwork could be performed and the physician said the tests would not be a problem. You could also look into paying for specific blood tests out-of-pocket, as this might keep your insurance company out of the loop. Some blood tests are relatively inexpensive.

    Edit: At least one of the values for the "Normal Lab Values" posted above look different than those I've seen. Creatinine sticks out. Additionally, I'm guessing those values are for white people. If you're black, there is a correction factor of something around 1.2 times the posted values.
  18. New Member
    Cinn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Age
    29
    Posts
    184
    Rep Power
    453

    Reputation

    Quote Originally Posted by Mazderati View Post
    I believe the renal analysis important given the typically higher protein consumption of people who lift weights, as higher protein intake generally creates more work for the renal system. Add to this the consumption of creatine, very low carbohydrate intake, or very low fat intake, and the kidneys are being asked to do a lot. Sodium is easy to eat and also calls for extra renal work, so that is a consideration as well. Having the test done certainly can't hurt anything. If nothing else, it would provide baseline numbers for any future problems.
    You have failed to address the same thing that the previous to posters suggesting this did. What exactly are you suggesting be tested? Unless a person is in renal failure there isn't much to be learned from any of the renal markers. And unless the person is in kidney failure or has pyelonephritis, glomerulonephritis, lower UTI, etc. urinalysis is not going to tell you much.

    Sodium does not call for extra renal work and a baseline is not really necessary because of reference ranges.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mazderati View Post
    Edit: At least one of the values for the "Normal Lab Values" posted above look different than those I've seen. Creatinine sticks out. Additionally, I'm guessing those values are for white people. If you're black, there is a correction factor of something around 1.2 times the posted values.
    You're thinking of GFR estimation. Actual chemistry values do not have a correction value based on race.
  19. New Member
    Mazderati's Avatar
    Stats
    4'6"  900 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    25
    Rep Power
    137

    Reputation

    Quote Originally Posted by Cinn View Post
    You have failed to address the same thing that the previous to posters suggesting this did. What exactly are you suggesting be tested?
    I'm not suggesting anything other than "normal" renal tests be run: creatinine, BUN, uric acid, protein, etc.; anything that is commonly tested with bloodwork or urinalysis and has to do with the renal system. Like I mentioned earlier, they certainly can't hurt anything.


    Quote Originally Posted by Cinn View Post
    Unless a person is in renal failure there isn't much to be learned from any of the renal markers. And unless the person is in kidney failure or has pyelonephritis, glomerulonephritis, lower UTI, etc. urinalysis is not going to tell you much.
    It looks like you're of the opinion that renal testing is wasteful unless someone already knows their renal system is failing? My question would be, how do you determine renal failure without renal testing? Renal analyses would seem markedly less important if they only told of the degree of failure rather than whether or not someone is, or is not, in failure.


    Quote Originally Posted by Cinn View Post
    Sodium does not call for extra renal work and a baseline is not really necessary because of reference ranges.
    I'm thinking along the lines of high sodium leading to high blood pressure leading to kidney problems. I probably should have said sodium indirectly taxes the renal system. I disagree that baseline measurements are not important. Someone who has had high or low (out of range) sodium all their life may not be at any greater risk for renal problems than someone who has values within the normal range.


    Quote Originally Posted by Cinn View Post
    You're thinking of GFR estimation. Actual chemistry values do not have a correction value based on race.
    Actually I was thinking that the range values should change for everything based on race but that is wrong. To my knowledge, the range values mentione above should stay the same across races. I believe target average glomerular filtration changes based on age, but the target average GFR stays the same across races? And, then the observed GFR value changes if you are black, which is what you are mentioning.
  •   

      
     

Similar Forum Threads

  1. doctor ?
    By cassimus in forum Post Cycle Therapy
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-29-2009, 10:41 PM
  2. doctor doctor give me the news!!
    By ozarkaBRAND in forum Anabolics
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 02-16-2009, 08:50 PM
  3. Find a Doctor or Rate a doctor
    By nuker in forum Male Anti-Aging Medicine
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-28-2007, 05:18 PM
  4. Somebody Get Me A Doctor
    By David Dunn in forum Male Anti-Aging Medicine
    Replies: 91
    Last Post: 08-17-2006, 01:54 PM
  5. What do you tell your doctor?
    By Nullifidian in forum General Chat
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 05-06-2006, 12:47 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Log in
Log in