Chiropractic / Musculoskeletal / Joint pain Q & A...

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  1. Quote Originally Posted by bezoe View Post
    Scratch the supinator muscle premise. It originates on the humerus and inserts on the radius. More likely the popping is wrist flexor muscle tendons on the medial aspect of the elbow being "snapped" across the medial epicondyle of the humerus. Stretch them the same way I described in the previous post.
    Thanks for the advice Bezoe; I will stretch as you describe and see if it makes any difference.


  2. Quote Originally Posted by bezoe View Post
    Scratch the supinator muscle premise. It originates on the humerus and inserts on the radius. More likely the popping is wrist flexor muscle tendons on the medial aspect of the elbow being "snapped" across the medial epicondyle of the humerus. Stretch them the same way I described in the previous post.
    Wait, I'm confused at what you are saying?

    I know there are supinating and pronating muscles within the forearm which supinate and pronate the hand...

    I'm just a confused right now, LoL! Bare with me!
    Dr. Albert Scott Representative for FINAFLEX
    www.finaflex.com
    Redefine Yourself..... REDEFINE EVERYTHING!
    •   
       


  3. Quote Originally Posted by ScottyDoc View Post
    Wait, I'm confused at what you are saying?

    I know there are supinating and pronating muscles within the forearm which supinate and pronate the hand...

    I'm just a confused right now, LoL! Bare with me!
    LOL yea the "supinator" and the "pronator teres". Supination occurs at the wrist AND elbow. Its essentially just the radius rotating. The ulna doesnt move. I was thinking the "supinator" was on the medial aspect of the elbow which wouldnt be logical at all.. i was very sleepy last night so it took me reading my post after I posted it to realize lol.
    Suffer now.. and live like a champion later.

  4. Would anyone happen to know some ways to ease knee pain? I had a rod placed in my femur a few years ago and have been steadily bringing the strength back, but my job requires me to be on my feet on concrete in steel toe boots 50-60 hours a week and its takin a toll on my knees when I try to train. I have insoles in my boots, take osteo-biflex, and ibuprofen. I dont know what else to do.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by bomcgraw View Post
    Would anyone happen to know some ways to ease knee pain? I had a rod placed in my femur a few years ago and have been steadily bringing the strength back, but my job requires me to be on my feet on concrete in steel toe boots 50-60 hours a week and its takin a toll on my knees when I try to train. I have insoles in my boots, take osteo-biflex, and ibuprofen. I dont know what else to do.
    See a foot doctor, you may require orthopedic boots.
    Taste the rainbow.
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by bluehealer View Post
    See a foot doctor, you may require orthopedic boots.
    I agree, they are called orthotics, it could definitely help! Another thing that I have seen help lots of people with chronic foot, knee and low back problems are... Vibram FiveFingers : Barefoot Sports Shoes : Toe Shoes & Minimalist Shoes to be worn when not in your boots. In order to walk in these correctly you must walk on your toes and not heel strike when you walk, this builds up the gastroc muscles and the soleus muscles as well as limiting the amount of impact when you walk and strengthen all the muscles ligaments and tendons in your feet and legs, it is worth a shot, I have a pair and I love them!

    Dr. Albert Scott Representative for FINAFLEX
    www.finaflex.com
    Redefine Yourself..... REDEFINE EVERYTHING!

  7. Hey doc, I have this tendon, I assume, running horizontal across the outside of my kneecap.
    It's about 1/8" in diameter. It is very tendor/sore to the touch and when I bend my knee under a load (waking down stairs) my knee hurts.
    Taste the rainbow.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by bluehealer View Post
    Hey doc, I have this tendon, I assume, running horizontal across the outside of my kneecap.
    It's about 1/8" in diameter. It is very tendor/sore to the touch and when I bend my knee under a load (waking down stairs) my knee hurts.
    Besides the anatomy, a little mobilization and a little rehab, I'm not the best with knees! I usually refer those patients out to a friend who refers his elbow and shoulder patients to me, where I am more proficient! Based on the anatomy, it sounds like your LCL (lateral collateral ligament), besides the basics of R.I.C.E. (Rest, Ice, Compression, & Elevation), I can't be of much help to you, but I bet BEZOE can, YO BEZOE... What do you think, some input!!!
    Dr. Albert Scott Representative for FINAFLEX
    www.finaflex.com
    Redefine Yourself..... REDEFINE EVERYTHING!

  9. Quote Originally Posted by bluehealer View Post
    Hey doc, I have this tendon, I assume, running horizontal across the outside of my kneecap.
    It's about 1/8" in diameter. It is very tendor/sore to the touch and when I bend my knee under a load (waking down stairs) my knee hurts.
    I wanna bang your avitar while Im eating a bag of skittles.

    When you say the outside of your kneecap, it makes me think of the area just laterally to the kneecap- not the side of your leg at the knee. Pain in this area, especially when weight bearing and moving the joint, indicates lateral meniscus damage.

    I cant be sure of that online, as I would need to do some special knee tests on you in person. That and imaging are the only ways to really diagnose such an issue.
    Suffer now.. and live like a champion later.

  10. [QUOTE=ScottyDoc;2900455]I agree, they are called orthotics, it could definitely help! Another thing that I have seen help lots of people with chronic foot, knee and low back problems are... to be worn when not in your boots. In order to walk in these correctly you must walk on your toes and not heel strike when you walk, this builds up the gastroc muscles and the soleus muscles as well as limiting the amount of impact when you walk and strengthen all the muscles ligaments and tendons in your feet and legs, it is worth a shot, I have a pair and I love them!QUOTE]

    I never even thought about those. Thanks for the help!

  11. Quote Originally Posted by bezoe View Post
    I wanna bang your avitar while Im eating a bag of skittles.

    When you say the outside of your kneecap, it makes me think of the area just laterally to the kneecap- not the side of your leg at the knee. Pain in this area, especially when weight bearing and moving the joint, indicates lateral meniscus damage.

    I cant be sure of that online, as I would need to do some special knee tests on you in person. That and imaging are the only ways to really diagnose such an issue.
    Yo.. not disagreeing with you, but I always thought the meniscus (lateral or medial) were not painful? As in people can tear them and not even know they have done so, or am I thinking about something else, or is that only possible and not always the case, help me understand what I'm thinking of?
    Dr. Albert Scott Representative for FINAFLEX
    www.finaflex.com
    Redefine Yourself..... REDEFINE EVERYTHING!

  12. Quote Originally Posted by ScottyDoc View Post
    I agree, they are called orthotics, it could definitely help! Another thing that I have seen help lots of people with chronic foot, knee and low back problems are... Vibram FiveFingers : Barefoot Sports Shoes : Toe Shoes & Minimalist Shoes to be worn when not in your boots. In order to walk in these correctly you must walk on your toes and not heel strike when you walk, this builds up the gastroc muscles and the soleus muscles as well as limiting the amount of impact when you walk and strengthen all the muscles ligaments and tendons in your feet and legs, it is worth a shot, I have a pair and I love them!


    Hell Yes! I have a pair as well Doc!

    I actually did a bunch of research and conducted an inservice on these "barefoot/minimalist" shoes. The few studies done since their conception show three main positive benefits in wearing them:

    1. Increases the intrinsic muscle strength of the feet

    2. Increases lower extremity proprioception- thus increasing balance, by allowing the foot to feel everything under it

    3. Decreases impact on ankle, knee, and hip joints by promoting the "shock setting mechanism" (the body's way of altering gait mechanics to decrease amount of force placed on lower extremity joints). Basically this means when you are wearing these shoes and have little cushion under the heel, it causes you to walk moreso on your forefoot to decrease impact. This, in turn places less stress on your knee and hip joints over time.

    HOWEVER, one should not jump right into these shoes! If youve been wearing high arch, stability shoes for years, your plantar aponeurosis is not acclimated to the amount of stress you will be putting on it by wearing these. Plantar fascsitis is a bitch. The studies I looked at recommended a 10% a week transition to these shoes.
    Suffer now.. and live like a champion later.

  13. Quote Originally Posted by ScottyDoc View Post
    Yo.. not disagreeing with you, but I always thought the meniscus (lateral or medial) were not painful? As in people can tear them and not even know they have done so, or am I thinking about something else, or is that only possible and not always the case, help me understand what I'm thinking of?
    Ummm I know there can be pain with meniscal tears.. but im not sure there can be asymptomatic damage. It is very well possible though. Come to think of it, I believe I have heard of cases of just decreased ROM where the knee cannot terminally extend because of cartilage pinched between the condyles and tibial plateaus.

    Most of the cases Ive seen have included symptoms of pain though Doc.
    Suffer now.. and live like a champion later.

  14. Quote Originally Posted by bezoe View Post
    Ummm I know there can be pain with meniscal tears.. but im not sure there can be asymptomatic damage. It is very well possible though. Come to think of it, I believe I have heard of cases of just decreased ROM where the knee cannot terminally extend because of cartilage pinched between the condyles and tibial plateaus.

    Most of the cases Ive seen have included symptoms of pain though Doc.
    OK, was just asking, just thought I remembered something like that from school, as I said previously, Knees are not my forte, only familiar with the anatomy really!
    Dr. Albert Scott Representative for FINAFLEX
    www.finaflex.com
    Redefine Yourself..... REDEFINE EVERYTHING!

  15. No problem bro! I just try to throw in the little bit I know when you call on me!
    Suffer now.. and live like a champion later.

  16. Quote Originally Posted by bezoe View Post
    I wanna bang your avitar while Im eating a bag of skittles.

    When you say the outside of your kneecap, it makes me think of the area just laterally to the kneecap- not the side of your leg at the knee. Pain in this area, especially when weight bearing and moving the joint, indicates lateral meniscus damage.

    I cant be sure of that online, as I would need to do some special knee tests on you in person. That and imaging are the only ways to really diagnose such an issue.
    When I say outside of kneecap, I mean between the skin and the cap, not under as in the joint area. If you were looking at my knee, it would be just below the horizontal centerline of my kneecap, running left to right. I can move the "ligament" up and down by rubbing my finger on my knee. If I kneel down on it, it hurts like a bi_ch. A sharp pain.
    Taste the rainbow.

  17. Quote Originally Posted by bluehealer View Post
    When I say outside of kneecap, I mean between the skin and the cap, not under as in the joint area. If you were looking at my knee, it would be just below the horizontal centerline of my kneecap, running left to right. I can move the "ligament" up and down by rubbing my finger on my knee. If I kneel down on it, it hurts like a bi_ch. A sharp pain.
    As soon as I read that I thought of the Patellar Tendon and here is what I found on it:

    Patellar Tendonitis:

    The patellar tendon connects the kneecap (the patella) to the shin bone. This is part of the 'extensor mechanism' of the knee, and together with the quadriceps muscle and the quadriceps tendon, these structures allow your knee to straighten out, and provide strength for this motion. The patellar tendon, like other tendons, is made of tough string-like bands. These bands are surrounded by a vascular tissue lining that provides nutrition to the tendon.

    What causes patellar tendonitis?
    Patellar tendonitis is the condition that arises when the tendon and the tissues that surround it, become inflamed and irritated. This is usually due to overuse, especially from jumping activities. This is the reason patellar tendonitis is often called "jumper's knee."

    When overuse is the cause of patellar tendonitis, patients are usually active participants of jumping-types of sports such as basketball or volleyball. Patellar tendonitis may also be seen with sports such as running and soccer. Also, some patients develop patellar tendonitis after sustaining an acute injury to the tendon, and not allowing adequate healing. This type of traumatic patellar tendonitis is much less common than overuse syndromes.

    What are the symptoms of patellar tendonitis?
    Patellar tendonitis usually causes pain directly over the patellar tendon. Your doctor should be able to recreate your symptoms by placing pressure directly on the inflamed tendon. The other common symptom of patellar tendonitis is pain with activities, especially jumping or kneeling. Less common, but not unusual, is swelling around the tendon itself.

    X-ray tests are usually performed to confirm there is no problem with the bones around the knee. Occasionally, a bone spur is seen that can be related to patellar tendonitis. A MRI is useful in patients with chronic patellar tendonitis to look for areas of degenerative tendon.

    Reference: http://orthopedics.about.com/cs/pate...llartendon.htm
    Dr. Albert Scott Representative for FINAFLEX
    www.finaflex.com
    Redefine Yourself..... REDEFINE EVERYTHING!

  18. Quote Originally Posted by ScottyDoc View Post
    As soon as I read that I thought of the Patellar Tendon and here is what I found on it:

    Patellar Tendonitis:

    The patellar tendon connects the kneecap (the patella) to the shin bone. This is part of the 'extensor mechanism' of the knee, and together with the quadriceps muscle and the quadriceps tendon, these structures allow your knee to straighten out, and provide strength for this motion. The patellar tendon, like other tendons, is made of tough string-like bands. These bands are surrounded by a vascular tissue lining that provides nutrition to the tendon.

    What causes patellar tendonitis?
    Patellar tendonitis is the condition that arises when the tendon and the tissues that surround it, become inflamed and irritated. This is usually due to overuse, especially from jumping activities. This is the reason patellar tendonitis is often called "jumper's knee."

    When overuse is the cause of patellar tendonitis, patients are usually active participants of jumping-types of sports such as basketball or volleyball. Patellar tendonitis may also be seen with sports such as running and soccer. Also, some patients develop patellar tendonitis after sustaining an acute injury to the tendon, and not allowing adequate healing. This type of traumatic patellar tendonitis is much less common than overuse syndromes.

    What are the symptoms of patellar tendonitis?
    Patellar tendonitis usually causes pain directly over the patellar tendon. Your doctor should be able to recreate your symptoms by placing pressure directly on the inflamed tendon. The other common symptom of patellar tendonitis is pain with activities, especially jumping or kneeling. Less common, but not unusual, is swelling around the tendon itself.

    X-ray tests are usually performed to confirm there is no problem with the bones around the knee. Occasionally, a bone spur is seen that can be related to patellar tendonitis. A MRI is useful in patients with chronic patellar tendonitis to look for areas of degenerative tendon.

    Reference: http://orthopedics.about.com/cs/pate...llartendon.htm
    You da man doc. Probably due to leg extensions. Doesn't sound too serious but will def see a doctor about it just to be sure..
    Taste the rainbow.

  19. Quote Originally Posted by bluehealer View Post
    You da man doc. Probably due to leg extensions. Doesn't sound too serious but will def see a doctor about it just to be sure..
    Whenever possible, seeing a professional in person is always your best bet! If you have the resources, I would ask around and see if you can make an appointment with someone who specializes in knees and works with athletes, athletic specialists are usually the best because it is their job to advise the Athletes get them to or as close to 100% as possible, as their careers and sometimes millions of dollars are on the line! Trust me, word gets around as to who is best in your area, you could probably even Google it! I'm just saying I wouldn't just go to anyone, for example, if you came to me, I would probably only be able to identify what is injured and not give you the best advice on what to do/rehab etc. This is why I refer out, but some will just try anyway to make the $-Money-$, while not getting you any better than when you started because of their lack of knowledge in that area... (Blood-Sucking-A$$holes). So be careful, there are a lot of those out there!
    Dr. Albert Scott Representative for FINAFLEX
    www.finaflex.com
    Redefine Yourself..... REDEFINE EVERYTHING!

  20. Yup. Patellar tendonitis. I have a chronic case in my left knee.

    If you were an adolescent, we would have to consider Osgood Schlatter's and Patellofemoral syndrome as well but I doubt you are still growing, so those can be ruled out.

    EMG studies prove that open chain quadriceps exercises such as leg extensions place more strain on the patellar tendon than closed chained movements such as squats... UNLESS the open chain movement is performed with extremely heavy weight without completing terminal extension or with extremely light weight, and reaching terminal ext. if desired.

    There was a nice article on T-nation about it.. i will try to find it.
    Suffer now.. and live like a champion later.

  21. From your subjective statements, I can pretty much guarantee its some tendonitis. Ice it after workouts, warm it up good before working legs, and dont go to terminal (full) extension on leg extensions.

    There could always be a possibility of medial or lateral shifting of the patella due to increased or decreased Q angle- which would cause pain, but thats an entirely different beast.

    And whats up with the flowery looing colors they gave us?? Does everybody else have a bright colored screen now?

    Here it is: http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_...81-mcd02.hydra
    Suffer now.. and live like a champion later.

  22. just FYI, i'm going to go get my shoulder MRI'd on friday, just so we can see for sure if there is anything seriously damaged.

  23. That'll be interesting to see. I hope everything looks ok of course. Then again, im sure it would be nice to see some conclusive indication of why you are having issues.
    Suffer now.. and live like a champion later.

  24. Quote Originally Posted by bezoe View Post
    From your subjective statements, I can pretty much guarantee its some tendonitis. Ice it after workouts, warm it up good before working legs, and dont go to terminal (full) extension on leg extensions.

    There could always be a possibility of medial or lateral shifting of the patella due to increased or decreased Q angle- which would cause pain, but thats an entirely different beast.

    And whats up with the flowery looing colors they gave us?? Does everybody else have a bright colored screen now?

    Here it is: http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_...81-mcd02.hydra
    lol, ok thanks for the link but there are some big words in there. Basically what I got out of it was, do not do leg extensions. Lunges a better alternative?
    Taste the rainbow.

  25. I took A&P last year but my prof was horrible and I got lazy too so I failed the class. Any recommendations on where to look to help prepare for the A&P needed for Personal Trainer degree?
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