Glutamine supplimentation, whats the deal?

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    Glutamine supplimentation, whats the deal?


    I've read that its pointless, I see else where that its an absolute essential. Whats the verdict on Glutamine supplimentation?

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    If you do a SEARCH you will see that there are about a hundred threads debating this. There is no definitive answer to this it is mostly opinion, both side have studies they point to for their reasons.
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    The body cannot absorb orally ingested Glutamine!!!

    Most supplemental Glutamine is destroyed by digestive enzymes before it ever gets into the bloodstream. That's why no one ever got any impressive results from the use of all that extra Glutamine. The ONLY way for your muscles to reap the benefits of Glutamine is the way nature intended - by converting it from the Branched Chain Amino Acids! Buy some BCAA's or leucine. Save your money.
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    Once i started it i did recover alot faster
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    muscles was less sore too.
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    and that proves my point. Two different people, two different opinions.
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    I noticed some benefits from glutamine... I take it now with vitamin C to help reduce soreness and increase recovery. It's included in Xtend, which is a little bonus!
    Freedom means nothing here.
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    I have a wheat/gluten sensitivity, so I need to take L-Glutamine since I can't get it from food. I mix a teaspoon into my protein shakes. I can't say I've noticed any difference yet.
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    I've been slammed before for supporting the use of glutamine.

    I was informed by a person much smarter than me that all I was experiencing was a placebo effect.

    Well guess what. I'm dam happy with that placebo effect.

    Bulk glutamine is cheap. Try it and if it helps you ,
    great.
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    Its so cheap, buy it and see for yourself.
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    Any one can make a claim about amino and hype it.


    by David J. Barr
    One of the most frequent supplement questions I get as a strength
    coach is whether or not athletes should use the amino acid glutamine
    for either performance enhancement or size gains.

    The topic comes up so much that it almost seems as though glutamine is
    a "no brainer" supplement just like creatine. In fact, its popularity
    is such that at least two separate online message boards, as well as
    numerous magazines, have feature articles on the use of glutamine as a
    supplement. The dogma of glutamine supplementation had even permeated
    the SWIS symposium to the extent that the numerous conversations about
    this amino acid were solely about how much to take, rather than
    whether or not to take it.

    So, it seems as though everything is pretty cut and dried when it
    comes to glutamine use… or is it? While there was some
    literature-supported speculation as to the potential benefits of
    glutamine supplementation, there needs to be an updated review of the
    literature examining the current status of this purported "wonder
    supplement." In fact, there's quite a bit of information that's been
    left out of the popular bodybuilding literature that needs to be
    brought to light.

    But before we get on to that, we should review some of the basics of glutamine.


    Glutamine: The Basics

    For those of you who are new to the concept of glutamine
    supplementation, you should know that it's a non-essential amino acid
    created largely by our muscles. It's also noteworthy that glutamine is
    the most abundant free amino acid in our bodies, comprising up to 2/3
    of the muscle free amino acid pool.(13) This fact, coupled with the
    idea that muscle is the largest producer of this amino acid, could
    suggest that supplementation would be beneficial.

    One potential problem with this is that glutamine is a non-essential
    amino acid (meaning that we don't have to consume outside sources
    containing this amino acid because our bodies can make it on its own),
    but this is where things get interesting: the use of glutamine by many
    different cells in our bodies is so great that there may be times when
    its use exceeds its availability, therefore glutamine has been termed
    a "conditionally essential" amino acid.(1

    This means that during times of physical stress the body may actually
    need glutamine from the diet to maintain proper cellular function.
    Clearly, activities such as resistance training constitute a physical
    stress on the body, which is one reason that athletes have been
    targeted for glutamine supplementation.

    Another interesting fact about our muscles and glutamine is the issue
    of transport. For an amino acid to get into or out of our muscles, it
    has to be transported by specific carriers. Using these carriers, our
    muscle takes up amino acids according to demand from protein
    composition (i.e. what our muscles need the most), BUT amino acid
    release is NOT according to composition.

    Alanine and glutamine can account for up to 50% of amino acid release
    from muscle despite accounting for only about 15% of total muscle
    protein.(31) Obviously, this is a huge discrepancy—which is normally
    made up for through glutamine production—but as mentioned earlier,
    during times of physical stress (i.e. exercise), the synthesis of
    glutamine is hindered. Everyone knows that lacking even one amino acid
    can hinder muscle growth, which fortifies the theory of glutamine
    supplementation by athletes.

    Now that you're familiar with the basics behind glutamine
    supplementation, it's time to delve into the literature and pull out
    some more specific theories as to the beneficial effects of glutamine
    supplementation.


    Glutamine and Muscle Mass

    Interest first arose in glutamine as a supplement when it was found
    that glutamine enrichment elevated levels of protein synthesis in
    isolated rat muscles.(21) This isn't surprising since it's also been
    found that muscle protein synthesis levels can be correlated with free
    glutamine levels.(17) It's also been shown in vitro using rat skeletal
    muscle cells that glutamine may decrease protein breakdown.(22)

    Additionally, we know that the anabolic/catabolic state of a muscle
    cell is related to it's hydration status—this simply means that
    cellular swelling has an anabolic or an anticatabolic effect on the
    affected cells (including muscle cells). Based on this, it's been
    found that glutamine supplementation may mediate cell swelling and
    therefore an anticatabolic effect through either increasing cell
    swelling or hindering cellular dehydration.(2

    Sure you say, these theories are all well and good in cell cultures or
    animals, but what about the human studies? Well, studies in humans
    indicate that glutamine supplementation may improve nitrogen balance
    in critically ill patients, as well as assist in the prevention of
    protein synthesis decreases following surgery (a HUGE physical stress)
    or following a 14-hour fast.(13, 12,24,13) There have even been a
    couple of studies done on resistance trained subjects (more on that a
    little later)!


    Glutamine and Overtraining

    We've all felt the scourge of overtraining: the lethargy, the
    sickness, and the lack of desire to train. Aside from the horrible
    feeling associated with overtraining, we also know that the longer
    we're out of the gym, the longer we go without any anabolic stimulus
    to our muscles. Based on this, another theory suggesting glutamine
    supplementation for athletes involves the prevention of overtraining.

    Glutamine is used as a fuel source by many cells of our body,
    including many cells of our immune system. Now if you recall that
    there are times of stress where the body's production fails to meet
    its needs for glutamine, you can see that this could negatively affect
    the immune system. In fact, you may not be surprised to find that
    blood glutamine levels may be compromised following exercise induced
    overtraining.(1)

    Surveys of endurance athletes supplementing with glutamine following a
    marathon race showed lower rates of infection than those who didn't
    supplement.(8,9) As for the applicability to bodybuilding, one study
    showed that resistance exercise may induce a small transient (ie
    short-term) negative effect on some cells of the immune system,
    although plasma glutamine levels weren't examined.(6)

    So now we have theories for glutamine supplementation to increase
    protein synthesis/inhibit protein breakdown, as well as boost immunity
    following intense exercise. This sounds great, but we have yet to look
    at glutamine's potential effect to stimulate glycogen replenishment
    following exercise. Glutamine infusion has been shown to enhance
    glycogen stores following cycling exercise twice as much as compared
    to subjects who infused saline or other amino acids.(27) If this
    happened after weight training, it could even help with our cellular
    swelling and have the aforementioned postive effect on protein
    accretion.

    Another study supports the use of glutamine for enhancing muscle
    glycogen. Bowtell et al. found that glutamine supplementation
    following exercise enhanced glycogen resynthesis in muscle just as
    well as the ingestion of a glucose polymer.(4)

    Sadly at this point, many readers have already gone out and bought
    their kilos of glutamine, and are now reading only to find out how to
    use the stuff. You may argue, why not? There's plenty of evidence to
    support the theories presented! This was exactly the thinking when
    glutamine was introduced to bodybuilders several years ago. In fact,
    the journal articles reviewed above are the same research papers that
    can be found time and again, in any outdated article that's trying to
    sell you on glutamine. But things have recently changed; new studies
    have been done on animals, and people involved in resistance training,
    but the results are less than positive.


    What the Glutamine Salespeople Don't Want You To Know:

    Glutamine and Protein Synthesis — The other side of the coin

    We've seen the theory that glutamine levels in the blood and muscle
    may decrease during or following exercise, and that this decrease
    correlates with reduced levels of protein synthesis. Several studies
    have addressed whether this relationship between glutamine and protein
    synthesis was a coincidental or a causal (meaning that one caused the
    other) relationship.

    The first study compared the abilities of glutamine and the amino acid
    alanine to stimulate protein synthesis in rats with artificially
    reduced blood and muscle glutamine levels.(23) As expected, glutamine
    infusion increased intramuscular glutamine levels, while alanine
    didn't. Surprisingly, even depleting muscle glutamine levels by 60%
    had no effect on protein synthesis. What may also surprise you is that
    restoring blood and muscle glutamine levels to normal had no effect on
    protein synthesis compared to rats receiving no glutamine treatment!
    Additionally, even though whole body protein turnover didn't change,
    alanine stimulated protein synthesis!

    In support of this contention, researchers studied the effect of
    glutamine supplementation on septic rats. Sepsis is a severely
    catabolic condition, during which glutamine levels (and protein
    synthesis) fall. Again, this study showed that despite increasing
    muscle glutamine levels to even higher than normal, it had no effect
    on protein synthesis or the catabolic state of the rats.(11)

    Cumulatively, these studies show that decreased or increased levels of
    glutamine in the muscle has no effect on protein synthesis.

    Another study, performed on people, examined the effect of adding
    glutamine to an amino acid mixture on muscle protein synthesis .(30)
    Ultimately, infusion of the original amino acid mixture increased
    protein synthesis by nearly 50%, but adding glutamine to this mix had
    no additional effect. This study is particularly relevant because most
    consumers of glutamine do so following a workout, along with other
    amino acids (or a whole protein).

    Finally, Wusteman et al., used a drug to reduce muscle protein
    synthesis, along with muscle glutamine levels, in rats.(29) Much like
    the Olde Damink et al. study, restoring muscle glutamine levels to
    normal had no effect on protein synthesis. This study further supports
    the concept that blood and muscle glutamine levels have no bearing on
    protein synthesis and protein turnover.


    Editor's note: Part 2, which pretty much presents a case for
    relegating glutamine to the Retired Supplements shelf (except for very
    specific circumstances) will be posted next week.


    David J. Barr, CSCS, MSc. Candidate, is a Varsity Strength and
    Conditioning Coach at the University of Waterloo.
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    Quote Originally Posted by djbombsquad View Post
    The body cannot absorb orally ingested Glutamine!!!

    Most supplemental Glutamine is destroyed by digestive enzymes before it ever gets into the bloodstream. That's why no one ever got any impressive results from the use of all that extra Glutamine. .
    not true. Splanchnic tissue absorbs most, that is why it does not make it to circulation hence doses need to be high to overcome this.

    I do not think it is beneficial to the average gym goer though. endurance athlete sure, burns yes, cachetic cancer patient definitely, joe schmoe pushing up some dumbells 4-5X per week nah.
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    The only ways i have taken glutamine is within my poseidon and when i used to use Xtend. I cannot without a doubt say it is effective as a muscle builder, but i believe it has a place to help with recovery, hydration, immune support, and digestion. Taking glutamine with food can help to balance the meals pH if it is highly acidic.
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    The Glutamine debate lives on and never dies,

    The Glutamine debate is often referred to as the "Great Debate." It's the emotion-packed question of the 21st century -- does it work, if so - how does it work and why or it doesn't work, the pubmed studies, placebo claims????

    it's as big as Evolution Vs Creation or pro choice vs pro life IMHO
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    Has anyone noticed anything from taking say GlutamineEE or GlutamineAKG?


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    Quote Originally Posted by pushinweightw View Post
    Has anyone noticed anything from taking say GlutamineEE or GlutamineAKG?
    N-Acetyl-Glutamine worked just as well as regular glutamine and I hear magnesium glycel glutamine (I think that's it) is really good stuff.
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    so there's Glutamine,N-Acetyl-Glutamine and also magnesium glycel glutamine

    what next, glutamine ethyl ester?
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    Quote Originally Posted by b unit View Post
    so there's Glutamine,N-Acetyl-Glutamine and also magnesium glycel glutamine

    what next, glutamine ethyl ester?
    Hahaha... indeed, there is GEE. There's the classic glutamine peptides... don't forget them!
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    how about glutabol? (17a-methyl-glutamine-2-ene-17-b-ol)
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    Quote Originally Posted by TSB4me View Post
    I've been slammed before for supporting the use of glutamine.

    I was informed by a person much smarter than me that all I was experiencing was a placebo effect.

    Well guess what. I'm dam happy with that placebo effect.

    Bulk glutamine is cheap. Try it and if it helps you ,
    great.
    trust u tsb to be amongst another glutamine debate, you can't help yourself.
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    I was looking in to glutamine SR to try out even though I don't believe in taking it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by b unit View Post
    trust u tsb to be amongst another glutamine debate, you can't help yourself.
    Just offering my 2 cents B.

    At least I didn't mention any names this time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TSB4me View Post
    Just offering my 2 cents B.

    At least I didn't mention any names this time.
    not yet anyway

    personally i go on record as saying i support glutamine

    my call to all the glutamine knockers is if u think glutamine is such a big scam then go hassle nutra planet for selling it or nimbus for putting into posidieon etc etc
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    The real debate is probably moreso along the lines of "Does glutamine supplementation offer advantageous benefits (such as supporting LBM) to the bodybuilder or athlete?"

    I personally think it's good on a cut.
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