White Flood: new Fruit Punch flavor review!

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  1. My quads are fried. You should try the tabata's, they build big quads, and stimulate cardio improvement and fat burning like nothing else. They will also make you more sore than anything else. Dr tabata was a sick ****.


  2. Quote Originally Posted by poison View Post
    My quads are fried. You should try the tabata's, they build big quads, and stimulate cardio improvement and fat burning like nothing else. They will also make you more sore than anything else. Dr tabata was a sick ****.
    i read about resolve doing low weight-high volume reps on squats and have been doing that-i agree sore as hell. i used 150 pounds and went till exhaustion-was sore as hell next day.
    GOD, FAMILY, COUNTRY!!!
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  3. Few things in life live up to their hype (wrinkle-free pants and for instance). But the Tabata Protocol--which sounds like it could be a tantric sex act or a secret martial art--deserves its reputation. It's a simple cardiovascular-training routine that's been proven to improve performance and fitness in a very short time--14 minutes to be exact, including a five-minute warm-up and a five-minute cool-down. Sound too good to be true? It's not, and if you give it a go, you'll quickly find out why.
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    The Tabata Protocol--named after Izumi Tabata, Ph.D., a former researcher at Japan's National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya--is an interval routine developed by the head coach of the Japanese speed-skating team. (It's called a protocol because Tabata and his team took the speed-skating coach's workout and studied it to quantify just how effective it really was.) The workout consists of six to seven 20-second full-speed sprints interspersed with rest periods of 10 seconds.

    In Tabata's study, the researchers found that guys who used the routine five days a week for six weeks improved their maximum aerobic capacity (a measure of your body's ability to consume oxygen--the more oxygen you can take in, the longer and harder you'll be able to run) by 14%. What's more, it also improved anaerobic capacity (which measures your speed endurance, or the duration you're able to sprint at full effort) by 28%. So the Tabata Protocol is the rare workout that benefits both endurance athletes and sprinters--hard to accomplish. Consider: A study of traditional aerobic training--running at 70% of aerobic capacity for 60 minutes--for the same number of weeks showed an improvement in aerobic capacity of 9.5% and no effect on anaerobic capacity.

    The key to the Tabata Protocol's effectiveness appears to be the short rest intervals between sprints. Conventional interval-training guidelines suggest keeping a 1:3 work-rest ratio. That is, your rest periods should last three times as long as the duration of your sprints. But the Tabata Protocol's work-rest ratio is 2:1, which means your rest periods are only half as long as the time you're working. And according to another Tabata study, that formula isn't just more effective than traditional aerobic training, it's also more effective than typical interval training. In that other study, Tabata and his colleagues compared their original protocol to a second configuration of intervals that consisted of 30-second sprints interspersed with two-minute rest periods. Despite the fact that this required subjects to sprint for more time at a higher intensity, the original Tabata Protocol still proved more effective at boosting both aerobic and anaerobic capacity.

    QUICK RESULTS

    On paper, the Tabata Protocol offers a quick way to get fit in just four minutes of high-intensity work per session. But don't be misled: This regimen is grueling. It was originally developed for Olympic-caliber athletes, and Dr. Tabata reported that they were wiped out by the routine. It's worth mentioning that when testing the protocol--described as 6-7 sets--most of the subjects were exhausted after the sixth set of sprints and couldn't complete the seventh. So this style of training isn't for a beginner and should only be considered by someone who has a solid fitness base. That includes most Men's Fitness readers, but if you're just starting to work out or you're out of shape, start easy, rest three to four times as long as your sprint duration, and see "Assess Your Risk" on page 143.

    TAKE THE TABATA TEST

    If you think you've got what it takes, here's the drill. First, do a five-minute warm-up by running, cycling, or jumping rope for five minutes at about 40% of your full effort. For the intervals, work on a track, treadmill, stationary bike, elliptical trainer, or a heavy gym bag, and alternate 20 seconds of activity at full effort with 10-second rest periods. Each sprint-rest combo counts as one interval. After the intense section, do a five-minute cool-down in the same way you warmed up. Try to do four intervals at first, then gradually work your way up to six. Repeat the workout three to four days a week.

    Assess Your Risk

    Get a physical exam before trying this workout if you re over 40 or have two or more of the following risk factors: a family history of heart disease, you re a smoker, you re sedentary, you re overweight, or you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure.

    Alex Koch, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of exercise science at Truman State University in Kirksville, Missouri.
    .....

  4. Juso tonight, first time in 2 months!

  5. Quote Originally Posted by poison View Post
    Juso tonight, first time in 2 months!
    slacker, lol.
    GOD, FAMILY, COUNTRY!!!
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  6. My job is all evenings, cuts out every single class. It's killing me, I was up for a belt upgrade, black would be the next level, but I missed it.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by poison View Post
    My job is all evenings, cuts out every single class. It's killing me, I was up for a belt upgrade, black would be the next level, but I missed it.
    how long before you get another go at it?
    GOD, FAMILY, COUNTRY!!!

  8. Whenever I'm ready, it's not at all time related. But seeing as I'm not training at all, I'm losing progress. It'll be a while to get back up to where I was, and that's if I was back regularly. This job is all I got, and it's not gonna change soon, this week just worked out to give me 2 judo nights off.

    I may switch to BJJ soon. I can't afford it, it's $150+ per month, but I had a gift card to Sax 5th Ave, an xmas present from a client. I tried to sell it, and couldn't, so I bought a Swiss Army watch for $475, and I'm trying to sell it for $300. If I can, I'll try to work a deal with the BJJ place, get a couple months of morning classes out of it.

    Gah! I won't give up! I made huge progress in judo, nearly 3rd degree brown in 2 years. I love it, I can't stop.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by poison View Post
    Whenever I'm ready, it's not at all time related. But seeing as I'm not training at all, I'm losing progress. It'll be a while to get back up to where I was, and that's if I was back regularly. This job is all I got, and it's not gonna change soon, this week just worked out to give me 2 judo nights off.

    I may switch to BJJ soon. I can't afford it, it's $150+ per month, but I had a gift card to Sax 5th Ave, an xmas present from a client. I tried to sell it, and couldn't, so I bought a Swiss Army watch for $475, and I'm trying to sell it for $300. If I can, I'll try to work a deal with the BJJ place, get a couple months of morning classes out of it.

    Gah! I won't give up! I made huge progress in judo, nearly 3rd degree brown in 2 years. I love it, I can't stop.
    i get the feeling that you will make it happen-good luck.
    GOD, FAMILY, COUNTRY!!!

  10. Judo was awesome last night. I took 1 scoop WF around 6pm, hit the gyn at 6:20-6:40, did bench and rows, got to judo by 6:45 and caught up with friends, and class was 7-9pm. I expected it to be worse than it was, given 2 months off, but the short intense workouts with lots of DL, burpees, tabatas, alternating rows and bench, etc, are apparently a good way to keep up overall judo fitness.

    I was extremely tired yesterday afternoon, but the WF perked me right up, and endurance was great all through class, though I didn't feel as 'springy' as before I stopped going. I feel kind of heavy, though that's to be expected, as I've put on weight (a bit of fat, too).

    I got home, ate, watched an episode from season II of Breaking Bad, and was in bed by 11:30. I had no trouble sleeping whatsoever, so 1 scoop was a good call.

    Thanks, bigt.

    And a pic for your pleasure:


  11. Judo tonight, I'll post tomorrow. Here's a pic, the blonde girl, ronda, took the first US womens medal in judo in 2008. She trains at my dojo, when she's in town. And kicks my ass. The pic is from a couple days ago.


  12. I took a heaping scoop WF at 6pm, was in the gym by 6:30, did alternating pullups/dips (5/7) without rest to failure, then went to judo. Warmup was easy, it was a different sensei, then we went straight into class.

    We practiced different forms of osoto gari:



    [nomedia="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loUJH_JgkhY&feature=re lated"]YouTube- Judo: Isao Okano O Soto Gari[/nomedia]

    It's not 'my' throw at all, I'm not comfortable with it, and it hurts my right shoulder/rotator. I can do a modified osoto when backing up, which most people don't do. Anyway, class was great. I worked hard, I fought hard, I threw some black belts, which surprised me given my 2 months off. Apparently it's sunk in a bit.

    Effects: Despite having eaten a large burrito around 5pm, the WF hit pretty hard. Endurance in my pullup/dip routine was stupid good, and I had no fatigue issues in judo whatsoever, outlasting my opponents easily. The nootropic effects are worth gold, it's just easier to pick up new ideas, and translate them to physical motion. Superb!

  13. In........

  14. Hey, celc5, thanks!

    I got my fingers crossed that I don't have an early start for work tomorrow. If I can squeeze a workout in, it'll be run/DL/bench/rows. Can't wait!

    BTW, I know my workouts are somewhat untraditional. This weeks judo classes, after 2 months of not attending, validated what I do really well. I felt remarkably good, and wasn't gasping like a fish out of water, so the high intensity/supersets/high rep stuff is working. Keeping my strength, too. I do need to work my abs more.

  15. i can hear my old bones snap, crackle and popping just looking at those pics, lol.
    GOD, FAMILY, COUNTRY!!!

  16. You get used to it, bigt. the problem is that it's hard to start as an adult, because you have to learn to fall. It's much easier to learn as a kid: you're lighter, lower to the ground, etc. So the learning curve is very steep for adults coming in for the first time. It took me 6 month to be able to go hard and leave class without a pinched nerve or other tweakage. But once you get it, it's all good. I get thrown 50-60 time per class, no problem. It's interesting to watch the old guys; they very much resist being thrown, as it hurts too bad. They all stiff from 30-50 years of judo pounding. And their skill level is so ****ing high, they're nearly impossible to throw. I hope that's me someday.

  17. hey poison,

    great to see your still going at the CL supplements and judo.
    subb'd!~

  18. Quote Originally Posted by poison View Post
    . It's much easier to learn as a kid
    In hindsight, I wish I would have golfed and learned a martial art as a kid. Now, even at 30, I can't get ANYONE to do the things I'm good at such as football. It's a wasted skill for me

  19. Great Log...I tried a sample of white flood and was quite impressed. Thinking I may need to pick up a tub of it myself.

  20. Holy ****! I think I'm on to something!

    I woke up at 6:40, hit 1.5 scoops of WF at 7, and was in the gym by 7:25. I ran 2 miles in 15 on my toes (no barefoor, the bally's dude was checking on me ). I grabbed an abb maxx recovery 60carb/35 protein, and started sipping as I headed to the weights.

    I sarted with decline bench, alternated with chest supported tbar rows, working up each set, 5 sets of 10, 6th set at 5-7 ie failure-ish. The only rest was walking between machines and weight changes.

    Then I hit deadlift, 10 x 135, then sets of 5, adding 20lbs each set, with the only rest being weight changes, for 5 sets.

    I finished off with alternating ex bar curls and skull crushers, rotator work, and a stretch session. Out in 55 minutes. I looked jacked, and vascularity is still insane.

    I went home, showered, and was at work by 10, where I sat waiting for my client, and ate 2 whopping PB&J sandwiches on whole grain sprouted bread, around 700cals.

    And I realized something, while eating. I was euphoric. Like high, a bit aggro, and with a nearly insatiable need to ****ing break something, or sprint, or fight. Sky high motivation and urge. And now at 11:30, I feel GREAT. Getting hungry, but great.

    There's something about the first thing in the morning, empty stomach dose, and intense ball breaking workout. GH release? The hell if I know, but it's great.

  21. Quote Originally Posted by RenegadeRows View Post
    hey poison,

    great to see your still going at the CL supplements and judo.
    subb'd!~
    Thanks, man! I've been having issues getting to judo. I finally, after 2 years, got a job that looks like it may be long term. Awesome, because I have a wife and kids, and it's been brutal. But it's all day, and through the evening, every day, so the job cuts out all judo classes. Sucks when the job gets in the way of fun/hobbies/workouts, etc. I'm trying to find an alternate solution, either bjj which has morning classes, or something else. Bjj is too damn expensive, thoug, I can't afford it. We'll see.

    CL is one of the top companies out there, outstanding products. White flood, purple wraath, blue gene, orange triad, oximega, golden gains, REDuction PM, some of my favorite isht right there, and the best in class for each.

  22. Quote Originally Posted by celc5 View Post
    In hindsight, I wish I would have golfed and learned a martial art as a kid. Now, even at 30, I can't get ANYONE to do the things I'm good at such as football. It's a wasted skill for me
    I hear you. It's weird, people lose their minds at some point. I can't tell you how often I've heard friends and others say 'i'm 30/40/whatever now, it's time to grow up', which is fine. But they give up their passions, and get lazy and complacent, fat and ugly and bitter.

    **** that noise. I'll be 36 this month, and I can give 20yo's a run for their money in almost any forum. I can't stop age, but I am in control of how it happens, and my own mind. Jack lalanne, randy couture, and any number of old dudes in my dojo.

    I started judo late, 2 years ago. But it's never too late, celc5. I won't stop, God help me, and I aim to be winning judo competitions at 50 and well beyond.

    Go do it, man, it's not too late, and surround yourself with like minded folks!

  23. Quote Originally Posted by poison View Post
    You get used to it, bigt. the problem is that it's hard to start as an adult, because you have to learn to fall. It's much easier to learn as a kid: you're lighter, lower to the ground, etc. So the learning curve is very steep for adults coming in for the first time. It took me 6 month to be able to go hard and leave class without a pinched nerve or other tweakage. But once you get it, it's all good. I get thrown 50-60 time per class, no problem. It's interesting to watch the old guys; they very much resist being thrown, as it hurts too bad. They all stiff from 30-50 years of judo pounding. And their skill level is so ****ing high, they're nearly impossible to throw. I hope that's me someday.




    what you say about skill level is relevant to every aspect of live, hopefully as we age we acquire enough skill to compensate for losing a step or 2 as we get older.
    GOD, FAMILY, COUNTRY!!!

  24. Very true. But in life there's no teacher, no guidebook, it's trial and error with a time limit. With martial arts, the answers are handed to you, thousands of years of combat knowledge in a nice, tight package. The challenge is in doing it, absorbing it successfully; it ain't easy, but it is acheivable, if you work hard enough.

    That's why, imo, martial arts are so awesome. It gives you the feeling of doing something perfectly right, of mastery overy yourself and a technique, in a very controlled environment. It's easier to succeed in other aspects of life, and do life perfectly right (we can try, right?), when you've actually applied yourself and mastered something in a single area, even if small. The perserverance you learn on the mat bleeds (pun intended) into every day life. It'd be tough to succeed, or master, if you've never felt success, or mastery.

  25. Quote Originally Posted by poison View Post
    Very true. But in life there's no teacher, no guidebook, it's trial and error with a time limit. With martial arts, the answers are handed to you, thousands of years of combat knowledge in a nice, tight package. The challenge is in doing it, absorbing it successfully; it ain't easy, but it is acheivable, if you work hard enough.

    That's why, imo, martial arts are so awesome. It gives you the feeling of doing something perfectly right, of mastery overy yourself and a technique, in a very controlled environment. It's easier to succeed in other aspects of life, and do life perfectly right (we can try, right?), when you've actually applied yourself and mastered something in a single area, even if small. The perserverance you learn on the mat bleeds (pun intended) into every day life. It'd be tough to succeed, or master, if you've never felt success, or mastery.
    life IS trial and errors-the key is to not repeat same mistakes too often. having lived in the philipines in the 80's, i appreciate the things we often take for granted-try going without indoor running water or electricity for just a week. seeing teenaged kids with 1 leg or no arms selling cigarettes for money to eat and sleeping on the streets makes it easier when your doctor is running late for your appointment. it is not always success or mastery that makes you tough, sometimes it is the hardships we endure or see others suffer without complaint.
    GOD, FAMILY, COUNTRY!!!
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