Grapefruit Juices Effect What Now?

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    Grapefruit Juices Effect What Now?


    I know there are some things that grapefruit juice effects differently. I've heard that you shouldn't take meds with GF juice or certain supps, but is any of this true?? Where's Dr, D??? I like GF Juice a lot, but I don't want it messin' with my meds or supps! Help!!

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    Grapefruit affects absorption rates and possibly amounts, I'm not sure of the amounts statement though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hurleyboy05;
    I know there are some things that grapefruit juice effects differently. I've heard that you shouldn't take meds with GF juice or certain supps, but is any of this true?...? Where's Dr, D??? I like GF Juice a lot, but I don't want it messin' with my meds or supps! Help!!
    General commercial grapefruit juice is not necessarily the core of the issue. More important is the per-serving amount of the active flavonoid (plant pigment) in grapefruit known as naringin/naringenin. Most producers of grapefruit juice select fruits with low naringin content, so as to supply grapefruit juice of the required level of bitterness.
    Naringin is the compound that gives grapefruit juice its characteristic bitter taste and helps intensify the perception of taste (if grapefruit is consumed as a fruit). It (naringin) is also responsible for extending the half-life (slowing the breakdown) of other compounds supplemented simultaneously. Naringin's effects are cumulative (get more pronounced over time). Naringin does not discriminate. It potentiates the positive effects of other compounds and also amplifies their negative effects. Typically, naringin interferes with the activity of compounds used in treating allergies, estrogen synthesis, sedatives, management of high blood pressure and cholesterol levels, calcium channel blockers, and so on. If you are on drugs or medications for any of these conditions, you may want to reconsider taking naringin simultaneously, except you understand the precise pharmacological responses of the affected compounds to naringin. Recommended naringin doses can range from 25mg to 200mg daily. It may be hard to translate this amount into liters of grapefruit juice due to lack of standardization of naringin extracts in grapefruit manufacture.
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    Thanks for clearing that up strategic. I figured that a glass of Minute Maid gf juice probably wasn't going to kill me, but I'll just make sure to watch the naringin content, and if I decide to have a glass, I'll just make sure I haven't taken/am going to take any meds or supps around that time.
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    Grapefruit is BENEFICIAL to many sups. Especially PH's and oral steroids. Many companies are adding narnigin to their sup to make it more bio-available.

    NOT good for things like blood pressure medicine though. Package labels will tell you if you should avoid grapefruit. (at least for prescription meds)
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwolfWV;
    Grapefruit is BENEFICIAL to many sups. Especially PH's and oral steroids. Many companies are adding narnigin to their sup to make it more bio-available.

    NOT good for things like blood pressure medicine though. Package labels will tell you if you should avoid grapefruit. (at least for prescription meds)
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    if I'm not mistaking, don't they make a supplement that contains the grapefruit extract? something like GMB or something like that? also I've heard lots of people taking superdrol with grapefruit with great results......
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    narnigin is what you are talking about. And yes, grapefruit juice will help with superdrol. Superdrol is an oral steroid. Thats what I posted above when I said "Especially PH's and oral steroids"
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    Grapefruit Juice And Medication Can Be A Dangerous Mix

    Grapefruit Juice And Medication Can Be A Dangerous Mix

    ScienceDaily (Jan. 26, 2005) — January 18, 2005 -- Grapefruit juice can be dangerous for people on certain medications, nurse researchers remind doctors, nurses, and everyone who takes medicine and enjoys grapefruit juice, in a paper in the American Journal of Nursing, a journal of the American Nurses Association.

    Amy Karch, R.N., M.S., of the School of Nursing at the University of Rochester Medical Center reported on a man from a northern climate who moved to Florida for the winter – one of tens of thousands of “snowbirds” who head south each winter – and began drinking two to three glasses of grapefruit juice each day. The man became critically ill as a result of an interaction between grapefruit juice and his cholesterol-lowering medication.

    Karch’s paper, “The Grapefruit Challenge: The juice inhibits a crucial enzyme, with possibly fatal consequences,” appears in the December 2004 issue of the journal.

    Interactions between grapefruit juice and medications have long been recognized. Last year, the Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics devoted an entire issue to grapefruit juice and the dangerous drug interactions that can result. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration requires all prospective new drugs that are thought to interact with this enzyme system to be tested for interactions with grapefruit juice. And a warning about grapefruit juice is included in the “food-drug interactions” that come with dozens of medications. Nevertheless, Karch says many health-care professionals and patients don’t know about the risk.

    “The potential of drug interactions with grapefruit juice has been out there a long time, but most people just aren’t aware of it,” says Karch, a clinical associate professor of nursing. “There is so much information bombarding people all the time, that a lot of people may have heard this but forgotten it. But the problems can be life-threatening.”

    The patient profiled in Karch’s article had high cholesterol and other risk factors for cardiac disease. The doctor put the patient on atorvastatin (Lipitor), and the patient began dieting and exercising. Two months after the patient went to Florida for the winter, he suddenly had muscle pain, fatigue and fever, and went to the emergency room. The patient ended up going into kidney failure and ultimately died.

    The only major change in the person’s lifestyle had been that, upon arriving in Florida, he began picking grapefruit off a tree on the patio and drinking two or three glasses of fresh grapefruit juice every day.

    Karch, an expert on drug interactions, explains that grapefruit juice is one of the foods most likely to cause problems with drugs, because it is metabolized by the same enzyme in the liver that breaks down many drugs. The cytochrome P-450 3A4 enzyme breaks down grapefruit juice into useful components for body, just like it breaks down dozens of medications. Karch says when the system is overloaded, the grapefruit juice can “swamp” the system, keeping the liver busy and blocking it from breaking down drugs and other substances.

    Drugs that use the same pathway and interact with grapefruit juice target some of the most common health problems doctors see today. The list consists of more than 50 medications, including some drugs used to treat high cholesterol, depression, high blood pressure, cancer, depression, pain, impotence, and allergies.

    Karch notes that interactions with grapefruit juice are well known and documented among drug researchers, and that an appropriate warning label is included with each prescription. Nevertheless, she says that many patients, nurses and doctors aren’t aware of the interactions or the potential serious consequences, and that many people fail to read the warning labels about drug-food interactions.

    The consequences of an interaction depend on the drug involved. A person on an anti-depressant might have too much or too little energy, depending on the specific medication. Someone on antibiotics might end up with diarrhea or could be ill longer than usual because the some drugs won’t work as well as they should. A heart patient might not get the lowered blood pressure that a medication should deliver, or the heart’s rhythms might become irregular if an anti-arrhythmia drug can’t do its job. The juice could also affect the effectiveness of a woman’s hormone-replacement-therapy medication.

    The most severe effects are likely with some cholesterol-lowering medications, Karch says. While the liver devotes its resources to grapefruit juice, the medication could build up to dangerous levels, causing a breakdown of the body’s muscles and even kidney failure. This is likely what happened to the patient discussed in the article, Karch says.

    To prevent such problems, Karch repeats what doctors and nurses tell their patients every day: Read a medication’s warning label carefully. If an interaction with grapefruit juice is possible, the patient should stop drinking the juice until speaking with his or her doctor. In some cases it might be possible to switch a patient to a different drug without the risk; in other cases the patient might simply have to give up grapefruit juice.

    She says that more people than usual are vulnerable at this time of year, because losing weight is among the most popular New Year resolutions, and some diets are built around drinking lots of grapefruit juice.

    Karch’s paper is the latest in a column the journal devotes to “practice errors,” where nurses report unusual clinical problems and Karch looks into how widespread the problem might be. Last year she also reported that nurses had found that some types of skin patches could catch on fire when patients receive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.
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    ^^^ Good post...I was going to say if no one talks about the "enzyme" then I was going to haha. I found out that it was a big NO NO while I was on an SSRI...
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    I've never heard of anyone having any side effects from drinking the grapefruit juice and taking superdrol. The more I think about it I can't recall anyone on any of the ph's complaining of abnormal side effects. Has anyone else come across any???.........
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    In that application it is a good thing. The enzyme in mention helps with absorption of the actives that you desire to have absorbed at a highest rate as possible. Some orals that are not methylated can have their absorption improved this way.

    It is the consumption of grapefruit juice with some medications for medical purposes that can cause adverse reactions in some patients.
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    just take your creatine with fast digesting carbs after your work outs
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    Quote Originally Posted by hookemcats View Post
    I've never heard of anyone having any side effects from drinking the grapefruit juice and taking superdrol. The more I think about it I can't recall anyone on any of the ph's complaining of abnormal side effects. Has anyone else come across any???.........
    Did you read anything I posted here?
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    Thanks B5150
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    Also, never mix grapefruit juice and alcohol. Very bad combination...
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    I would certainly be cautious when taking grapefruit juice with ANY oral pill, be it medication, oral steroids, or your daily multi. The pill that you are ingesting contains a specific Mg weight based upon the expected absorption of the said pill's contents.

    If a superdrol pill has 20 mg's per cap, its probably expected that you are actually absorbing and using far less than total mg weight. Although supplements obviously are not regulated or monitored by the FDA, there is probably at least some rudimentary logic behind the dosing of the pill.

    If you take that superdrol pill with grapefruit juice, it IS more than likely to enhance absorption of the contents, therefore more of the active component is introduced to the blood stream, nervous system and so on. There is a reason people experience problems with higher doses of these hormones...

    I feel it is a dangerous game to play in an effort to gain the slightest bit more effectiveness out of product that is plenty effective when taken according to proper recommendations.

    I'm not just some kid with an opinion. Well technically I'm a young man with an opinion, but my opinion is based on the latest research, education and hands on experience that I have as a graduating senior in the Texas State Human Nutrition and Foods program.

    During the past fall semester I was privileged enough to take a course from one of the foremost up and coming Nutrition and Nutrigenetics researchers in our profession. The course, taught by Dr. Dhiraj A. Vattem, was Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals and the vast majority of the course material covered topics similar to - and exactly the same as - the question at hand.

    I'll have to review my lecture notes on grapefruit specifically and see if there is anything else I feel is worth adding or may be of benefit for those concerned to know about
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medic View Post
    just take your creatine with fast digesting carbs after your work outs
    LMAO, WHAT? this was off the wall.
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    would be very interested bird.........
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    Quote Originally Posted by strategicmove View Post
    It (naringin) is also responsible for extending the half-life (slowing the breakdown) of other compounds supplemented simultaneously. Naringin's effects are cumulative (get more pronounced over time). Naringin does not discriminate. It potentiates the positive effects of other compounds and also amplifies their negative effects. Typically, naringin interferes with the activity of compounds used in treating allergies, estrogen synthesis, sedatives, management of high blood pressure and cholesterol levels, calcium channel blockers, and so on. If you are on drugs or medications for any of these conditions, you may want to reconsider taking naringin simultaneously, except you understand the precise pharmacological responses of the affected compounds to naringin.
    It does not potentiate the positive effects nor does it amplify negative effects. It simply inhibits an enzyme that metabolizes certain drugs causing increased bioavailability and serum levels. Granted, this may increase negative side effects secondary to >therapeutic levels systemically.
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    My 1st immediate thought was that maybe I should not take DRIVE (has naringin) with my Red Yeast Rice(Natural Statin Content?)... Thoughts?
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    To the best of my knowledge all the statin content of red yeast rice has been removed due to FDA regulations.
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    Hi fellas - just conducting some research on the forum and found two threads of interest that were chock full of great science-based information. I understand this thread is from a couple years ago, but I have read each and every post, and have a few questions to perhaps further the conversation in a different more specific direction please:

    Aside from the usually discussed: GFJ/Naringin/DHB/Bioperine/Emblica Officinalis compounds taken with medications and/or oral steroids... what would the thoughts of the contributors here be regarding their usage with natural non-hormonal OTC supplements (if a user was not on any medications at the time and was looking to extend and amplify the half-life and efficacy of their supplement protocol)?

    Thank you
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