Disruption in Nitric Oxide Synthesis - AnabolicMinds.com

Disruption in Nitric Oxide Synthesis

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    Disruption in Nitric Oxide Synthesis


    Ok, here is the answer to our ED problems.

    “asymmetric dimethylarginine” or ADMA

    How to get rid of it???
    Sometimes even Cialis does not help.
    ------------------------------------------------------------

    Le Magazine October 2007 - Report: The Intimate Link Between Erectile Dysfunction And Heart Disease
    Disruption in Nitric Oxide Synthesis
    The body’s source for nitric oxide production is the amino acid L-arginine, which is naturally found in many foods. The average American ingests about 3,000–5,000 mg of L-arginine per day, as it is an amino acid naturally contained in many foods. Meats of all varieties, nuts, and dairy products are rich in L-arginine, so the body is accustomed to intake levels of several thousand milligrams every day.


    A deficiency of L-arginine, however, does not generally disrupt nitric oxide synthesis because L-arginine availability is not the rate-limiting step in this process. In fact, research over the past five years has identified an endogenous (occurs in the body naturally) inhibitor called “asymmetric dimethylarginine” or ADMA, an amino acid which blocks the production of nitric oxide. By acting as an L-arginine mimic, this damaging look-alike effectively elbows out L-arginine and pushes it off to the side in the biochemical pathway leading to the synthesis of nitric oxide. ADMA is relatively elevated in patients with hypertension, high levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, homocysteine and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), as well as with aging itself. This inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis may very well be the common factor shared by all of these abnormal conditions. Increased levels of this detrimental inhibitor (ADMA) block nitric oxide production, leading to endothelial dysfunction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JanSz View Post
    Ok, here is the answer to our ED problems.

    “asymmetric dimethylarginine” or ADMA

    How to get rid of it???
    Sometimes even Cialis does not help.
    ------------------------------------------------------------

    Le Magazine October 2007 - Report: The Intimate Link Between Erectile Dysfunction And Heart Disease
    Disruption in Nitric Oxide Synthesis
    The body’s source for nitric oxide production is the amino acid L-arginine, which is naturally found in many foods. The average American ingests about 3,000–5,000 mg of L-arginine per day, as it is an amino acid naturally contained in many foods. Meats of all varieties, nuts, and dairy products are rich in L-arginine, so the body is accustomed to intake levels of several thousand milligrams every day.


    A deficiency of L-arginine, however, does not generally disrupt nitric oxide synthesis because L-arginine availability is not the rate-limiting step in this process. In fact, research over the past five years has identified an endogenous (occurs in the body naturally) inhibitor called “asymmetric dimethylarginine” or ADMA, an amino acid which blocks the production of nitric oxide. By acting as an L-arginine mimic, this damaging look-alike effectively elbows out L-arginine and pushes it off to the side in the biochemical pathway leading to the synthesis of nitric oxide. ADMA is relatively elevated in patients with hypertension, high levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, homocysteine and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), as well as with aging itself. This inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis may very well be the common factor shared by all of these abnormal conditions. Increased levels of this detrimental inhibitor (ADMA) block nitric oxide production, leading to endothelial dysfunction.

    Yep and low e2 causes this and decreases no2. too much No2 causes stress to adrenals as well ..no brainer. Look up nitric oxide and adrenal fatigue there is a big explaination of it i found..

    http://www.newtreatments.org/cfs
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    FYI, the same doc who wrote that article also has a very interesting blog http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/

    He uses the CT Scan machine to measure calcification in the heart. This isn't new. However, he has a regimen which can reverse the coronary placques using fish oil, vitamin D3 (oil based only) and a wheat-free diet. It's very interesting and hard to argue with an approach that measures results.

    He also recommends cholesterol of 60:60:60 LDL, HDL, Triglycerides. If I'm doing my math right that totals to 132 total cholesterol. This maybe good for heart plaques, but probably has a hormonal trade-off.

    Mark
    •   
       

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkLA View Post
    FYI, the same doc who wrote that article also has a very interesting blog http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/

    He uses the CT Scan machine to measure calcification in the heart. This isn't new. However, he has a regimen which can reverse the coronary placques using fish oil, vitamin D3 (oil based only) and a wheat-free diet. It's very interesting and hard to argue with an approach that measures results.

    He also recommends cholesterol of 60:60:60 LDL, HDL, Triglycerides. If I'm doing my math right that totals to 132 total cholesterol. This maybe good for heart plaques, but probably has a hormonal trade-off.

    Mark
    Total cholesterol under 160 you are increasing chance of strokes by 200%
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    By what actions does low E2 cause lowered NO production? Can you explain this further HAN? I have low E2 in comparison to total t. I thought DHT was responsible for NO production? Wouldn't high DHT cause more NO production?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megazoid View Post
    By what actions does low E2 cause lowered NO production? Can you explain this further HAN? I have low E2 in comparison to total t. I thought DHT was responsible for NO production? Wouldn't high DHT cause more NO production?
    We do not compare E2 to T directly, T/E2 ratios are old fashion.
    The best I can come up is individual

    FreeT
    FreeDHT
    FreeE2

    tests. (They are on my list of blood tests.)

    Basically both FreeT and FreeE2 are highly dependent of SHBG.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkLA View Post
    FYI, the same doc who wrote that article also has a very interesting blog http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/

    He uses the CT Scan machine to measure calcification in the heart. This isn't new. However, he has a regimen which can reverse the coronary placques using fish oil, vitamin D3 (oil based only) and a wheat-free diet. It's very interesting and hard to argue with an approach that measures results.

    He also recommends cholesterol of 60:60:60 LDL, HDL, Triglycerides. If I'm doing my math right that totals to 132 total cholesterol. This maybe good for heart plaques, but probably has a hormonal trade-off.

    Mark
    So possibly instead of worrying abour erection problem, we should do investigation on the state of plaque.
    We may get more good results.
    ============================== ===
    If you do not mind,
    plese post the math for my education.

    http://www.trackyourplaque.com/fo03-00benefits.asp
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    edited this post, found the info on the blog
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    Quote Originally Posted by JanSz View Post
    So possibly instead of worrying abour erection problem, we should do investigation on the state of plaque.
    We may get more good results.
    ============================== ===
    If you do not mind,
    plese post the math for my education.

    http://www.trackyourplaque.com/fo03-00benefits.asp
    Well, my erection is actually working pretty well these days. My symptom is that I just don't have much sex drive which kind of ends up with the same result.

    I think it is good that we look after our overall health. We're all interested in healthy hormones here as we should be, but for longevity we need healthy arteries, heart, etc.

    I actually had a heart scan a few months ago. I got zero which is the best possible score. This is good, but most people who're 35 would also have a zero. The doc who did the scan is mid 50's and he also had a score of zero. This is more impressive. The test was $400 cash.

    I've also read that ED is sometimes a warning sign of heart disease, so it's worth looking into.

    As for the math: TC = LDL + HDL + (Triglycerides/5)

    So with Dr. Davis's stated ideal of 60:60:60, we'd have TC=60+60+(60/5) which totals to 132. He seems to say this is doable with Niacin and Vitamin D3 and no wheat...

    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkLA View Post
    Well, my erection is actually working pretty well these days. My symptom is that I just don't have much sex drive which kind of ends up with the same result.

    I think it is good that we look after our overall health. We're all interested in healthy hormones here as we should be, but for longevity we need healthy arteries, heart, etc.

    I actually had a heart scan a few months ago. I got zero which is the best possible score. This is good, but most people who're 35 would also have a zero. The doc who did the scan is mid 50's and he also had a score of zero. This is more impressive. The test was $400 cash.

    I've also read that ED is sometimes a warning sign of heart disease, so it's worth looking into.

    As for the math: TC = LDL + HDL + (Triglycerides/5)

    So with Dr. Davis's stated ideal of 60:60:60, we'd have TC=60+60+(60/5) which totals to 132. He seems to say this is doable with Niacin and Vitamin D3 and no wheat...

    Mark
    How to find place that does the heart scan that we are talking about, there is at least few types of this test, I am sure, so I need the correct name.
    Parsippany NJ 07054

    Any questions, that I shoul ask before the test.
    Any other tips?
    ======================
    About 10 years ago I did some test that was checking my cardiovascular system.
    The results were good at the time.
    Do not remember details, not even sure if that was the test we are discussing here.

    Possibly I will find report on that test.
    I came with CD and a program so I could watch slides of my results.
    ==========================
    TC = LDL + HDL + (Triglycerides/5)
    152.6=87+43+113/5
    how to adjust, what to adjust first?
    I am already taking 1500iu D3 and 600mg niacin

    Blood test shows Vitamin D, 25-OH, Total=72(20-100)
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    Quote Originally Posted by JanSz View Post
    How to find place that does the heart scan that we are talking about, there is at least few types of this test, I am sure, so I need the correct name.
    Parsippany NJ 07054

    Any questions, that I shoul ask before the test.
    Any other tips?
    ======================
    About 10 years ago I did some test that was checking my cardiovascular system.
    The results were good at the time.
    Do not remember details, not even sure if that was the test we are discussing here.

    Possibly I will find report on that test.
    I came with CD and a program so I could watch slides of my results.
    ==========================
    TC = LDL + HDL + (Triglycerides/5)
    152.6=87+43+113/5
    how to adjust, what to adjust first?
    I am already taking 1500iu D3 and 600mg niacin

    Blood test shows Vitamin D, 25-OH, Total=72(20-100)
    Here is the info from where I went:

    S. Mark Taper Foundation Imaging Center - Coronary Calcium Scan
    S. Mark Taper Foundation Imaging Center - Cardiac CT Imaging

    The CT scan is very fast -- a few minutes and no injections. I also got a CD with some pictures, but to my non-medical eye, I really don't know what I'm looking at.

    According to Dr. Davis and others, coronary calcium is strongly correlated with "adverse events" much more so than cholesterol numbers.

    Your HDL (like mine) is a little low. When Dr. Berman (heartscan doc) met with me after my test he said I looked great but if I was going to have an event later it would be because my HDL is a little low due to genetics.

    Niacin therapy from what I read, you start with 500mg then after a few weeks increase to 1000mg, then possibly 1500mg if needed. Sometimes people need to go higher. The adverse effects from what I recall happen much more at 3000mg+ or with extended release. I figure best to have the lowest effective dose and only increase if needed. You're having the blood checked during this time to make sure there's no adverse effects/toxicity.

    I'm currently taking 500mg Niacin only, but may adjust after the next blood tests this week.

    From what I read, No-flush Niacin does not work at all - it is to be avoided. Extended release Niacin does work, but there seem to be more issues (liver I think) in taking it. Regular Niacin seems to be the safest. You have to put up with the flush, but to me that's not a big deal.

    D3 needs to be oil-based. I read Dr. Davis recommends blood levels of 50-100, so maybe you are OK. However, he also recommends 4000iu/day and takes 6000iu/day himself. I'm ignorant of adverse reactions from too much D3, so you should look into that.

    One more that he has mentioned in the blog is oil based Vitamin K2. I haven't read much specifically, but here is one blog post The Heart Scan Blog: Vitamin K2 and coronary plaque

    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkLA View Post
    Here is the info from where I went:

    S. Mark Taper Foundation Imaging Center - Coronary Calcium Scan
    S. Mark Taper Foundation Imaging Center - Cardiac CT Imaging

    The CT scan is very fast -- a few minutes and no injections. I also got a CD with some pictures, but to my non-medical eye, I really don't know what I'm looking at.

    According to Dr. Davis and others, coronary calcium is strongly correlated with "adverse events" much more so than cholesterol numbers.

    Your HDL (like mine) is a little low. When Dr. Berman (heartscan doc) met with me after my test he said I looked great but if I was going to have an event later it would be because my HDL is a little low due to genetics.

    Niacin therapy from what I read, you start with 500mg then after a few weeks increase to 1000mg, then possibly 1500mg if needed. Sometimes people need to go higher. The adverse effects from what I recall happen much more at 3000mg+ or with extended release. I figure best to have the lowest effective dose and only increase if needed. You're having the blood checked during this time to make sure there's no adverse effects/toxicity.

    I'm currently taking 500mg Niacin only, but may adjust after the next blood tests this week.

    From what I read, No-flush Niacin does not work at all - it is to be avoided. Extended release Niacin does work, but there seem to be more issues (liver I think) in taking it. Regular Niacin seems to be the safest. You have to put up with the flush, but to me that's not a big deal.

    D3 needs to be oil-based. I read Dr. Davis recommends blood levels of 50-100, so maybe you are OK. However, he also recommends 4000iu/day and takes 6000iu/day himself. I'm ignorant of adverse reactions from too much D3, so you should look into that.

    One more that he has mentioned in the blog is oil based Vitamin K2. I haven't read much specifically, but here is one blog post The Heart Scan Blog: Vitamin K2 and coronary plaque

    Mark
    Thank you.
    The links you have given me are for Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, CA.
    I am in NJ, close to Manhattan NYC.
    It would help if I knew the technical name ot the test so I coul possibly Google it and find location in my area that does the test.
    I have two big hospitals within 10 miles and 30 miles to Manhattan.

    What would be the best way to increase HDL.

    My pre-RedYeastRice
    Total Cholesterol was about 220.

    I am taking K2=1000mcg

    as part of

    Super Booster Softgels With Advanced K2 Complex
    60 softgels
    Item Catalog Number: 980
    http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item00980.html

    How much K2 one need to make difference?

    ===================
    ===================
    Find a scan center

    http://www.trackyourplaque.com/fo05-00findscan.asp
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    The official name, I think is a "Coronary Calcium Scan".

    For my $400, I got scanned, a Dr. looked at the images and gave me my score and his analysis. The score is determined by computer analysis of the images. A CD came in the mail later.

    http://www.trackyourplaque.com/fo05-00findscan.asp#NJ

    Hackensack University Medical Center
    Preventive Cardiology Program
    20 Prospect Avenue, Suite 200.
    Hackensack, NJ 07601
    Phone: 201-996-3802


    Intecardia LifeCare Imaging
    3 Sheila Drive
    Tinton Falls, NJ 07724
    Phone: 732-345-0900


    Princeton Longevity Center
    46 Vreeland Dr
    Skillman, NJ 08558
    Phone: 609-430-0752

    I'd research these, ask them about a Coronary Calcium Scan, make sure they give you a score, that it's done in the CT machine, etc.

    I'm not sure on the K2 dosage. I'm going to look into this more once I get my T straightened out. Please let me know what you turn up in your searching.

    P.S. I had heard that you can't get Red Rice Yeast which contains lovastatin anymore. Is this not the case?

    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkLA View Post
    The official name, I think is a "Coronary Calcium Scan".

    For my $400, I got scanned, a Dr. looked at the images and gave me my score and his analysis. The score is determined by computer analysis of the images. A CD came in the mail later.

    http://www.trackyourplaque.com/fo05-00findscan.asp#NJ

    Hackensack University Medical Center
    Preventive Cardiology Program
    20 Prospect Avenue, Suite 200.
    Hackensack, NJ 07601
    Phone: 201-996-3802


    Intecardia LifeCare Imaging
    3 Sheila Drive
    Tinton Falls, NJ 07724
    Phone: 732-345-0900


    Princeton Longevity Center
    46 Vreeland Dr
    Skillman, NJ 08558
    Phone: 609-430-0752

    I'd research these, ask them about a Coronary Calcium Scan, make sure they give you a score, that it's done in the CT machine, etc.

    I'm not sure on the K2 dosage. I'm going to look into this more once I get my T straightened out. Please let me know what you turn up in your searching.

    P.S. I had heard that you can't get Red Rice Yeast which contains lovastatin anymore. Is this not the case?

    Mark
    Thank you for thorought answer.
    =============================
    Compare red yeast rice prices:

    http://www.nextag.com/now-red-yeast-rice/search-html

    $24-$27
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    On topic of heart scans.

    http://smartlifeforum.org/wiki/2005/05

    http://smartlifeforum.org/2005/05/newsletter.html

    Phillip Lee Miller, MD

    Cardio Vascular Disease and Heart Attacks

    --------------
    There is an alternative. Super fast EBT (electron beam tomography) scans with the GE-Imatron HeartScan, have been in use for the last ten years. [www.geimatron.com/02_technology.htm] These scans grade coronary artery calcification by location and intensity. Since, initially, these scans have been patient-initiated or directed they were ignored or even derided by the general medical community until the last two to three years. Then we began to see the use of these scans at the Mayo Clinic for determining the necessity of hospitalization due to chest pain. With a zero calcium score, you are probably going to be sent home. They are seen as more accurate than simply looking at cardiac enzymes.

    Competing super fast CT Scanners with more generalized applications have now entered the market with similar calcium scoring but not identical technology. The jury is out. An intense medico-economic debate and political battle is being waged A comprehensive workup would include a dual isotope (sustamebe-technetium-thallium) heart scan, a stress treadmill, 2-D Echocardiogram combined with the HeartScan and a full VAP (Atherotech) or Berkeley Heart Lab (BHL) fractionated lipid panel giving us a far more complete assessment. Carotid artery ultrasound and the newer, more specific, IMT scan (intimal media thickening) provide even more qualitative and quantitative evidence of arterial plaque accumulation and stability.

    On the horizon is the advent of non-invasive coronary artery virtual angiography. This will ***** Fantastic Voyage within three-five years. And what are we to make of various therapies including the raging statin (Lipitor, Mevacor, et al) debate that hopes, or threatens, to broaden its application and appeal in the coming years? There are indicators that the focus may shift quite soon to the raising of HDL even more than the reduction of LDL. The essence of Dr. Miller’s presentation is to make sense of this evolving theory and etiology of cardiovascular disease, coronary artery thrombosis and the appropriate workup that we should all understand and thoroughly discuss with our cardiologist or, hopefully never a thoracic surgeon. Our lives depend upon this.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megazoid View Post
    By what actions does low E2 cause lowered NO production? Can you explain this further HAN? I have low E2 in comparison to total t. I thought DHT was responsible for NO production? Wouldn't high DHT cause more NO production?
    let me ask you this why don't you geta boner on low e2?

    Simple lack of NO2 which is needed for increased blood flow to MR Willy
  

  
 

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