My Diet Plan

Page 3 of 3 First 123

  1. Quote Originally Posted by jonpaulevans View Post
    from a harvard review:
    One highly-publicized report analyzed the findings of 21 studies that followed 350,000 people for up to 23 years. Investigators looked at the relationship between saturated fat intake and coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Their controversial conclusion: “There is insufficient evidence from prospective epidemiologic studies to conclude that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD, stroke, or CVD...

    My words: So it seems people would read that paragraph and leave thinking, "okay so I can eat more saturated fats."

    Next paragraph in article:
    With headlines like “Saturated Fat is Not Your Heart’s Enemy,” and “NOT GUILTY: The Long-Standing Vilification of Saturated Fat Finally Turning to Vindication,” some of the media and blog coverage of these studies would have you believe that scientists had given a green light to eating bacon, butter, and cheese. But that’s an oversimplified and erroneous interpretation. Read the study and subsequent studies more closely, and the message is more nuanced: Cutting back on saturated fat can be good for health if people replace saturated fat with good fats, especially, polyunsaturated fats. Eating good fats in place of saturated fat lowers the “bad” LDL cholesterol, and it improves the ratio of total cholesterol to “good” HDL cholesterol, lowering the risk of heart disease. Eating good fats in place of saturated fat can also help prevent insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes.

    next para
    Cutting back on saturated fat will likely have no benefit, however, if people replace saturated fat with refined carbohydrates—white bread, white rice, mashed potatoes, sugary drinks, and the like. Eating refined carbs in place of saturated fat does lower “bad” LDL cholesterol—but it also lowers the “good” HDL cholesterol and increases triglycerides. The net effect is as bad for the heart as eating too much saturated fat—and perhaps even worse for people who have insulin resistance because they are overweight or inactive

    my words: so cut sat fats (to a degree) and avoid high-glycemic carbs (as my earliest conversation with a poster discussed 'about bread')

    final point from the article:
    The latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends getting less than 10 percent of calories each day from saturated fat. The American Heart Association goes even further, recommending limiting saturated fat to no more than 7 percent of calories. But framing diet recommendations in terms of “percentage of daily calories” is not terribly useful for the average consumer. That’s because people eat foods—not isolated nutrients.

    my words: So I seem to have the AHA recommendations of sat fat intake that I asked about previously. And before those two guys say "see, don't use percentages" notice the article says "average consumers" yet points out the percentage to aim for. Average consumers don't break down diets like us lifters and fitness freaks. If you are serious about monitoring your diet, learning where you operate at your best you need to know your macro count and have a good idea of the ratio/% it represents to your overall caloric intake. As a lifter I indeed look at my diet as isolated nutrients - that come in the form of chicken, lima beans, eggs, etc; which are packed full of nutrients to account for.
    my diet is 45/35/20 and total cals of 2992 based on my target body weight of 220 at 15% bf
    that makes my fat intake: of 66 grams (20%) so 10% would be 33 g of sat fat - I may go on the lower recommendation and cap off at 25 g of sat fats ( I think my math is right - it's from memory and in my head)

    Since this is a diet advice post - please advise
    Well you've done it now. Just had to introduce application, didn't you?




    * [email protected] me running, just couldn't hold the snark.


  2. Quote Originally Posted by JudoJosh View Post
    Thinking muscle fiber type has an influence on dietary needs is just silly. Your activities has a much bigger influence. Such as a wrestler vs a long distance runner but take a group of people who all have different fiber dominance and have them workout and nutrient needs will be the same. I think what you guys are confusing is comparing metabolic efficient to metabolic inefficiency.

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™II using Tapatalk 2
    Of course; the muscle fibers will only be activated dependant on the type of activity being performed, and type II are not likely to be activated whilist at rest etc. etc. hence why I stated that.

    Forgive me
    Serious Nutrition Solutions Representative
    X-gels: Arachidonic Acid made affordable
    •   
       


  3. Quote Originally Posted by TexasGuy View Post
    Well you've done it now. Just had to introduce application, didn't you?




    * [email protected] me running, just couldn't hold the snark.
    Oh, never mind. Lol.
    Serious Nutrition Solutions Representative
    X-gels: Arachidonic Acid made affordable

  4. Quote Originally Posted by Jiigzz View Post
    Oh, never mind. Lol.
    I just can't help myself.

    FWIW, I eat lots of saturated fats. Steak is as important as water in Texas. I still understand OP however.

    OP, consider pears, peaches, quinoa, shrimp, scallops, clams, plums, kale, cauliflower and lean pork cuts to your various categories.
  5. Re: My Diet Plan


    Quote Originally Posted by jonpaulevans View Post
    from a harvard review:
    One highly-publicized report analyzed the findings of 21 studies that followed 350,000 people for up to 23 years. Investigators looked at the relationship between saturated fat intake and coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Their controversial conclusion: “There is insufficient evidence from prospective epidemiologic studies to conclude that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD, stroke, or CVD...

    My words: So it seems people would read that paragraph and leave thinking, "okay so I can eat more saturated fats."

    Next paragraph in article:
    With headlines like “Saturated Fat is Not Your Heart’s Enemy,” and “NOT GUILTY: The Long-Standing Vilification of Saturated Fat Finally Turning to Vindication,” some of the media and blog coverage of these studies would have you believe that scientists had given a green light to eating bacon, butter, and cheese. But that’s an oversimplified and erroneous interpretation. Read the study and subsequent studies more closely, and the message is more nuanced: Cutting back on saturated fat can be good for health if people replace saturated fat with good fats, especially, polyunsaturated fats. Eating good fats in place of saturated fat lowers the “bad” LDL cholesterol, and it improves the ratio of total cholesterol to “good” HDL cholesterol, lowering the risk of heart disease. Eating good fats in place of saturated fat can also help prevent insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes.

    next para
    Cutting back on saturated fat will likely have no benefit, however, if people replace saturated fat with refined carbohydrates—white bread, white rice, mashed potatoes, sugary drinks, and the like. Eating refined carbs in place of saturated fat does lower “bad” LDL cholesterol—but it also lowers the “good” HDL cholesterol and increases triglycerides. The net effect is as bad for the heart as eating too much saturated fat—and perhaps even worse for people who have insulin resistance because they are overweight or inactive

    my words: so cut sat fats (to a degree) and avoid high-glycemic carbs (as my earliest conversation with a poster discussed 'about bread')

    final point from the article:
    The latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends getting less than 10 percent of calories each day from saturated fat. The American Heart Association goes even further, recommending limiting saturated fat to no more than 7 percent of calories. But framing diet recommendations in terms of “percentage of daily calories” is not terribly useful for the average consumer. That’s because people eat foods—not isolated nutrients.

    my words: So I seem to have the AHA recommendations of sat fat intake that I asked about previously. And before those two guys say "see, don't use percentages" notice the article says "average consumers" yet points out the percentage to aim for. Average consumers don't break down diets like us lifters and fitness freaks. If you are serious about monitoring your diet, learning where you operate at your best you need to know your macro count and have a good idea of the ratio/% it represents to your overall caloric intake. As a lifter I indeed look at my diet as isolated nutrients - that come in the form of chicken, lima beans, eggs, etc; which are packed full of nutrients to account for.
    my diet is 45/35/20 and total cals of 2992 based on my target body weight of 220 at 15% bf
    that makes my fat intake: of 66 grams (20%) so 10% would be 33 g of sat fat - I may go on the lower recommendation and cap off at 25 g of sat fats ( I think my math is right - it's from memory and in my head)

    Since this is a diet advice post - please advise
    Please post either the link, PMID or title of the paper.

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™II using Tapatalk 2
    PESCIENCE.COM

    "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates
    •   
       


  6. Quote Originally Posted by JudoJosh View Post
    Please post either the link, PMID or title of the paper.

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™II using Tapatalk 2
    Anabolic minds wont let me post links until I have 150 posts but I'll see if I can find the paper again and post it somehow.

    EDIT: www(dot)hsph(dot)harvard(dot)e du/nutritionsource/fats-full-story/
  7. Re: My Diet Plan


    Harvard study


    Red and processed meat consumption and risk of incident coronary heart disease, stroke, and diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Micha R, Wallace SK, Mozaffarian D.
    Source

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. [email protected]

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:

    Meat consumption is inconsistently associated with development of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and diabetes mellitus, limiting quantitative recommendations for consumption levels. Effects of meat intake on these different outcomes, as well as of red versus processed meat, may also vary.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence for relationships of red (unprocessed), processed, and total meat consumption with incident CHD, stroke, and diabetes mellitus. We searched for any cohort study, case-control study, or randomized trial that assessed these exposures and outcomes in generally healthy adults. Of 1598 identified abstracts, 20 studies met inclusion criteria, including 17 prospective cohorts and 3 case-control studies. All data were abstracted independently in duplicate. Random-effects generalized least squares models for trend estimation were used to derive pooled dose-response estimates. The 20 studies included 1 218 380 individuals and 23 889 CHD, 2280 stroke, and 10 797 diabetes mellitus cases. Red meat intake was not associated with CHD (n=4 studies; relative risk per 100-g serving per day=1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.81 to 1.23; P for heterogeneity=0.36) or diabetes mellitus (n=5; relative risk=1.16; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 1.46; P=0.25). Conversely, processed meat intake was associated with 42% higher risk of CHD (n=5; relative risk per 50-g serving per day=1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.89; P=0.04) and 19% higher risk of diabetes mellitus (n=7; relative risk=1.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.27; P<0.001). Associations were intermediate for total meat intake. Consumption of red and processed meat were not associated with stroke, but only 3 studies evaluated these relationships.
    CONCLUSIONS:

    Consumption of processed meats, but not red meats, is associated with higher incidence of CHD and diabetes mellitus. These results highlight the need for better understanding of potential mechanisms of effects and for particular focus on processed meats for dietary and policy recommendations.
    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™II using Tapatalk 2
    PESCIENCE.COM

    "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates

  8. JudoJosh - That's good news to me bc as someone with High cholesterol I was convinced I had to cut saturated fats - and that mainly meant I'd have to drastically reduce my beef intake. Jiigzz recommended a book about the cholesterol myth which I'm happy to say I received the other day and started reading it last night. I learning it's more about the TRANS-FATS than saturated. Bc of the input I've received on this thread I have upped my saturated fats by re-introducing beef into my regular diet and I gotta say I feel pretty good. It's only been a few days but I think I feel a huge relief with the new permission of steaks and ground beef in my meals. So thank you to everyone who is contributing and to everyone who will continue to contribute.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by JudoJosh View Post
    Thinking muscle fiber type has an influence on dietary needs is just silly. Your activities has a much bigger influence. Such as a wrestler vs a long distance runner but take a group of people who all have different fiber dominance and have them workout and nutrient needs will be the same. I think what you guys are confusing is comparing metabolic efficient to metabolic inefficiency.

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™II using Tapatalk 2
    Not sure if you're following the discussion on CS, but a high fat, low carb diet induces PCF-1Alpha. So I guess diet can be manipulated in this scenario for oxidative fibers. Not too sure about type II though. Be interesting to see
    Serious Nutrition Solutions Representative
    X-gels: Arachidonic Acid made affordable

  10. Quote Originally Posted by jonpaulevans View Post
    JudoJosh - That's good news to me bc as someone with High cholesterol I was convinced I had to cut saturated fats - and that mainly meant I'd have to drastically reduce my beef intake. Jiigzz recommended a book about the cholesterol myth which I'm happy to say I received the other day and started reading it last night. I learning it's more about the TRANS-FATS than saturated. Bc of the input I've received on this thread I have upped my saturated fats by re-introducing beef into my regular diet and I gotta say I feel pretty good. It's only been a few days but I think I feel a huge relief with the new permission of steaks and ground beef in my meals. So thank you to everyone who is contributing and to everyone who will continue to contribute.
    One thing is for certain, regardless of saturated fats being good or bad, you get lots of high-quality iron from your red meats. I usually eat deer/venison in place of beef which has less fat, less cholesterol (doesn't really matter though) and high in protein...and it's cheaper too since I pay about 50 bucks for an entire deer (30-60lbs of meat).

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Jiigzz View Post
    Not sure if you're following the discussion on CS, but a high fat, low carb diet induces PCF-1Alpha. So I guess diet can be manipulated in this scenario for oxidative fibers. Not too sure about type II though. Be interesting to see
    Now I have also read that you can convert a Type IIb into a Type IIa fast twitch with enough higher intensity cardio. As in, you can increase mitochondria to a point that the muscle evolves into a muscle that has some characteristics of both TI and TII's.

    Is there currently any studies looking into this? The long-term effects of muscle fiber adaptation to cardio?

  12. Quote Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
    Now I have also read that you can convert a Type IIb into a Type IIa fast twitch with enough higher intensity cardio. As in, you can increase mitochondria to a point that the muscle evolves into a muscle that has some characteristics of both TI and TII's.

    Is there currently any studies looking into this? The long-term effects of muscle fiber adaptation to cardio?
    Type I will never really transition to type II fibers, you can only shift the balance slightly. Type IIb can transition to type IIx under the right circumstances
    Serious Nutrition Solutions Representative
    X-gels: Arachidonic Acid made affordable

  13. Quote Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
    I get what ya'll are saying. There is a problem with the argument though.

    Someone who needs 2000 calories a day doesn't need as much fats, carbs or protein in general to maintain health as a person who needs 6000 calories per day. If 20% fats is healthy for a 250lb guy, it should also be healthy for a 150lb guy. If eating 40% protein is adequate for a 250lb guy on any given diet, then 40% protein should also be adequate for a 150lb guy.

    Does not everyone in the room understand that percentages are a type of measurement that is not tied to a specific unit of measure? Percentaged translate to any size person...

    Just because my 20% fat intake is 1000kcals less in per day compared to some other guy doesn't mean that I'm "knocking my macros out of wack". They are very much the same exact macros. I am not following what you guys are trying to say. The whole point of using percentages is so that it never gets knocked out of wack. I can't go around telling people to eat 250g protein daily to build muscle, because in some cases that is true and some it isn't. Yet I can say, eat 40% in protein. That applies every where.

    Percentages don't decide how big the pie is. They only decide how it is sliced.
    Percentage of the overall calorie intake.

  14. Quote Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
    One thing is for certain, regardless of saturated fats being good or bad, you get lots of high-quality iron from your red meats. I usually eat deer/venison in place of beef which has less fat, less cholesterol (doesn't really matter though) and high in protein...and it's cheaper too since I pay about 50 bucks for an entire deer (30-60lbs of meat).
    What???!!! you can buy a whole deer for $50??? Damn thats good.
    Serious Nutrition Solutions Representative
    X-gels: Arachidonic Acid made affordable

  15. Quote Originally Posted by Jiigzz View Post
    What???!!! you can buy a whole deer for $50??? Damn thats good.
    I'm going to guess shooting one and having it processed.

  16. Quote Originally Posted by TexasGuy View Post
    I'm going to guess shooting one and having it processed.
    proccessing costs alot more than 50 dollars where im from. closer to 200

  17. Quote Originally Posted by cumminslifter View Post
    proccessing costs alot more than 50 dollars where im from. closer to 200
    Same here but it's the best guess I can come up with. I would be pretty surprised if he was just buying a deer flat out for $50.

  18. Quote Originally Posted by TexasGuy View Post
    I'm going to guess shooting one and having it processed.
    10-4.

    Gotta love Tennessee prices. Some processing plants are as much as $80 but thats about it. Shoot, field dress, quarter it and drop it off for processing is cheapest.

  19. Quote Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
    10-4.

    Gotta love Tennessee prices. Some processing plants are as much as $80 but thats about it. Shoot, field dress, quarter it and drop it off for processing is cheapest.
    your lucky. iowa is alot more expensive

  20. Quote Originally Posted by cumminslifter View Post
    your lucky. iowa is alot more expensive
    Well, I do at least field dress the deer and quarter em up before dropping them off. Granted, I usually only get the basics - ground/burger, a few various steaks and maybe a few pounds of sausage.


    My family bagged 4 of them this past fall so we're stocked up til next season!

  21. Quote Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
    Well, I do at least field dress the deer and quarter em up before dropping them off. Granted, I usually only get the basics - ground/burger, a few various steaks and maybe a few pounds of sausage.


    My family bagged 4 of them this past fall so we're stocked up til next season!
    me and my dad always have to process our own. we have our own grinder, mixer, stuffer, ect... we usually make hamburgers, sausages and sticks
  •   

      
     

Similar Forum Threads

  1. Critique my diet plan etc.
    By JordanYek in forum Nutrition / Health
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-30-2012, 11:13 AM
  2. hey i need help with my diet plan!!
    By HarleyPitts in forum Nutrition / Health
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-27-2010, 06:06 PM
  3. What do you guys think about my Diet plan?
    By Changing in forum Weight Loss
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 06-05-2005, 08:28 PM
  4. My diet Plan (rookie) please help
    By tommyboy in forum Weight Loss
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-25-2004, 11:32 AM
  5. My diet plan...first time so any advice is welcomed.
    By tommy36p in forum Weight Loss
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-01-2004, 04:42 AM
Log in
Log in