fire service requires fitness

  1. New Member
    tryingharder's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  182 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    42
    Rep Power
    103
    Level
    6
    Lv. Percent
    59.23%

    fire service requires fitness


    im currently trying to join the fire service, and need to increase my fitness, im about to start increasing my cardio but i loose loads of weight when doing so, i also want to increase my muscle mass. is this possible while doing cardio 3 times a week 60mins each time??

  2. New Member
    EatMeat's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  230 lbs.
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    159
    Rep Power
    153
    Level
    11
    Lv. Percent
    3.91%

    yes and no, you can lose fat and gain some muscle at the same time, but i really believe that you can do these things more efficiently when you do them independent of eachother.

    get your diet looking good.
    eat lots of lean beef or chicken, fish.
    eat whole grain sourced carbohydrates,
    and cut out any kind of sugars or starchy carb rich foods within 4 hours of bedtime, espescially candy or sodas.
    dont forget to eat your vegetables too.

    i would do cardio in the morning before you eat anything.
    then when you do the weights later make sure you are eating some good carbs before and after
  3. Elite Member
    CopyCat's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  187 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Age
    34
    Posts
    6,254
    Rep Power
    719849
    Level
    58
    Lv. Percent
    46.69%
    Achievements Activity ProActivity AuthorityPosting ProPosting Authority

    Zone diet and crossfit
    ADVANCED MUSCLE SCIENCE
    Strongest On The Market
    RECOVERBRO: Est. Post #3222
    •   
       

  4. New Member
    bigdognhb's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  293 lbs.
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Age
    33
    Posts
    136
    Rep Power
    142
    Level
    10
    Lv. Percent
    98.27%

    Quote Originally Posted by tryingharder View Post
    im currently trying to join the fire service, and need to increase my fitness, im about to start increasing my cardio but i loose loads of weight when doing so, i also want to increase my muscle mass. is this possible while doing cardio 3 times a week 60mins each time??
    A bit of advice if your looking to get onto a full time dept. If you dont know what it is get a copy of the CPAT test and do alot of specific training. You need cardio but if your going to do anything HITT would be the best
  5. Registered User
    wrkn4bigrmusles's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  206 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Age
    35
    Posts
    708
    Rep Power
    462
    Level
    21
    Lv. Percent
    14.92%

    maybe practice running up stairs with heavy objects.. i dunno but i did watch a discovery channel special on firefighters
  6. Elite Member
    CopyCat's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  187 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Age
    34
    Posts
    6,254
    Rep Power
    719849
    Level
    58
    Lv. Percent
    46.69%
    Achievements Activity ProActivity AuthorityPosting ProPosting Authority

    CrossFit in Fire Fighting


    http://www.crossfitorillia.ca/catego...fire-fighting/


    The article below is what's from the link. It talks about firefighting and crossfit.



    CrossFit in Fire Fighting
    February 02nd, 2008 | Category: CrossFit and Fire Fighting
    This is a great CrossFit Journal including an article on the importance of fitness in general, and CrossFit in particular, for Fire Fighters.

    Putting Out Fires

    Lon Kilgore

    Honolulu Fire Department, Hawaii; Orange Country Fire Authority and Oakland
    Fire Department, California; Woodinville Fire and Life Safety District, Washington;
    Marietta Fire Department, Georgia; Parker Fire District, Colorado. What do all of
    these fire departments have in common?
    You’ve probably already guessed part of the answer: They use
    CrossFit, officially or unofficially, to prepare for the rigors of their
    profession. But there’s more. In firefighter competitions around
    the country, it seems that whenever CrossFit-trained personnel
    enter, they end up at the top of the field. We might even say that
    fire companies like those above dominate the competition.

    For those of us familiar with CrossFit and its results, this success is
    not terribly surprising. However, we have observed a phenomenon
    in these competitions that is curious indeed. In the parts of the
    competitions that require contestants to use oxygen tanks,
    CrossFit-trained firefighters consumed less from their oxygen
    bottles than other competitors. At first this seems odd—winners
    using less oxygen? The conventional understanding is that the more
    fit you are, the more oxygen you can consume (i.e., the greater
    your VO2 max), the higher levels of exertion you can sustain, and
    the faster you can get the job done. Doing the same amount of
    work in less time should require at least the same amount of
    oxygen, if not more. So why would these athletes show a reduction
    in oxygen consumed? This flies in the face of all accepted wisdom
    on the subject.

    Did the CrossFit-trained firefighters somehow become better
    at oxygen handling? Is there some kind of elaborate respiratory
    adaptation occurring that is related to an improved aerobic
    capacity? It is really tempting to look for some elegant explanation
    involving gas transport kinetics, enzymatic energy of activation,
    and a whole bunch of other scientific jargon. Let’s cut to the chase
    though and say that the short answer is “no” to all of the above;
    it’s not nearly that complex an explanation.

    The first point to consider is
    that CrossFit-trained firefighters
    are more efficient machines than
    their competitors. They are performing equivalent competition
    work at a lower metabolic cost compared to their rivals
    because they are performing less extraneous work. This is an
    adaptation in neuromuscular efficiency rather than an oxygen
    kinetics phenomenon. Traditional physical training used by
    lots of firefighters is often limited to linear aerobic movement
    (running) and linear strength training (machines). Neither of
    these modalities is applicable to the multiplanar challenges of a
    firefighter competition course—or, for that matter, to the actual
    job demands of a firefighter. CrossFit training, with its hugely
    variant exercise menu, develops multiple motor and metabolic
    pathways in every plane of motion and articulates well with real-
    world (and competition) motor challenges.

    So, OK, they are more efficient neurally and metabolically. But
    how does this reduce oxygen consumption? The single largest
    contributor to this reduction is an improvement in body control
    across a variety of movement patterns. CrossFit establishes and
    develops motor pathways relevant to sport and occupational effort.
    A well-developed motor pathway reduces the amount of external
    work done by the body and thereby reduces oxygen consumed.
    Think of it this way. Remember your first ring dip? Remember
    how wiggly your arms were and how much anterior-posterior and
    medial-lateral movement there was? Now fast-forward to today
    and your mastery of the ring dip. How much wiggling is there now?
    The movement is more coordinated and each repetition takes less
    time than those first few brutally hard and spastic dips. Regular
    CrossFit training has eliminated the extra work you used to do
    when you used a bunch of extra muscles to stabilize your body
    on the rings. Reducing the amount of working muscle reduces
    metabolic cost (calories burned and oxygen consumed). This
    will result in either the ability to perform an activity for a longer
    period of time or, in this instance with firefighters, in consuming
    less oxygen per unit work.

    Another factor that contributes to the improvement in efficiency
    is the increase in strength that results from CrossFit training. It is
    not intuitive, but it is strongly evident in the research literature
    that strength training increases running performance without
    increasing VO2 max. It is frequently thought that strength training
    somehow improves running economy by subtly altering technique.
    However, I find it difficult to believe, except in instances of gross
    strength imbalances and deficits, that one could hone technique
    for a specific skill with a general activity. I would propose that after
    you get stronger, the aerobic activity now represents a lower level
    of intensity and requires fewer motor units (less active muscle)
    to accomplish the same amount of work. Less muscle activity
    requires less ATP and requires less oxygen.

    So, my explanation of the observed phenomenon in the firefighter
    competitions is that CrossFit-trained firefighters become more
    neurally efficient and stronger. Both of these phenomena contribute
    to a lower muscular demand for oxygen and leave more of it in
    the bottle. Both also contribute to winning competitions. While
    these results are from competitions that simulate the real world
    of firefighting, they point strongly to the fact that CrossFit training
    prepares firefighters for the rigors of the profession better than
    other training systems.

    But let’s go beyond the individual firefighter. Let’s consider the
    missions of fire departments. Within the context of those
    missions, maximizing the safety of employees is important, as
    is having equipment and personnel capable of safeguarding the
    public. Administrators are also concerned with the fiscal bottom
    line as they have only so many dollars to provide a critical public
    service. If we think about these firefighting competition wins
    from the administrator’s perspective (beyond the PR perks), two

    observations of specific interest arise here:

    1. Because they can do more work in less time, these
    firefighters can be in harm’s way for a shorter period
    of time.

    2. By expending less energy and consuming less oxygen,
    these firefighters are able to do more repeated bouts
    of work.

    So the relevance of CrossFit to administrators is that their
    firefighters can do more work in less time, have a higher overall
    work capacity, are less likely to be injured, and consume fewer
    purchased resources (oxygen). This means healthier, more effective
    firefighters at a lower operating cost. Everyone wins: firefighters,
    administrators, and the public.

    And beyond the realm of firefighting, just think of the stunning
    importance of this—of being able, merely through effective physical
    training, to actually decrease the amount of oxygen required to
    fuel physical activity—for divers, astronauts, mountaineers, and
    anyone else who needs to work in low-oxygen environments. The
    implications are potentially staggering.

    Lon Kilgore, Ph.D., is an associate
    professor of kinesiology at Midwestern
    State University, where he teaches
    exercise physiology and anatomy. He has
    held faculty appointments in exercise
    science at Warnborough University
    (UK) and in kinesiology at Kansas State
    University. A nationally ranked weightlifter
    from age 13, he has extensive practical
    experience as an NCAA strength coach
    and as coach of international-caliber
    competitive weightlifters. He is a coaching
    certification instructor for all levels of
    USA Weightlifting’s coaching development
    system and has been a member or Chair
    of the USAW Sports Science Committee
    for 9 years. He was also a primary proposal
    author and researcher on the USOC
    Weightlifting Performance Enhancement
    Team project and is a member of the Board
    of Certification for the American Society
    of Exercise Physiologists. In addition to
    numerous articles in both academic and
    popular publications, he is coauthor of
    the books Starting Strength: A Simple and
    Practical Guide for Coaching Beginners and
    Practical Programming for Strength Training.
    ADVANCED MUSCLE SCIENCE
    Strongest On The Market
    RECOVERBRO: Est. Post #3222
  7. Elite Member
    CopyCat's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  187 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Age
    34
    Posts
    6,254
    Rep Power
    719849
    Level
    58
    Lv. Percent
    46.69%
    Achievements Activity ProActivity AuthorityPosting ProPosting Authority

    Here are a few more links relating specifically to crossfit's benefits to firefighting and one about prepping for the academy.

    CROSSFIT MANSFIELD: The Fire Service and Crossfit by Mike Contreras

    PDX|athlete - Private Coaching at CrossFit HEL - Firefighter Prep

    MFD - CrossFit

    CrossFit - Firehouse Forums - Firefighting Discussion

    Just google crossfit+firefighting if you want to see tons of more links relating.
    Last edited by CopyCat; 01-02-2009 at 04:01 PM. Reason: Last line and a link
    ADVANCED MUSCLE SCIENCE
    Strongest On The Market
    RECOVERBRO: Est. Post #3222
  8. New Member
    CrushTheEnemy's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  190 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12
    Rep Power
    78
    Level
    3
    Lv. Percent
    26.5%

    I am on the job and am about the same size as you. If it were me i'd focus on the cardio and get my endurance up first. Military style PT is most likely what you'll be facing at an academy (push ups, pull ups, dips, crunches... and alot of running). Definatley get your endurance up, breathing after all is the most important factor once you have an SCBA on. There's nothing worse than a guy going down because he is out of breath, or the guy who sucks down a bottle in 2 minutes..... The people hiring you will def be impressed with a 3 mile run time of 18 mins , especially if they've worked some good fires in the past and know what it takes to keep trucking along. One thing that i noticed is after wearing all the gear for 3 months straight training you will beef up certain parts of your body, Back, shoulders,legs and neck ( that helmet isn't light at first ha ha ) I'm not saying don't try to put mass on, I just don't think it would be wise to not hit the cardio as hard in fear of losing mass, when the cardio is def going to be more important. Good luck
  9. Senior Member
    Highlanda01602's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,254
    Rep Power
    739
    Level
    27
    Lv. Percent
    26.09%
    Achievements Posting Pro

    CopyCat beat me to it... Crossfit. Supplement with "Crossfit Endurance" run training to further increase your speed if you need to do so. It's structured functional fitness, and will develop an outstanding base to work with. If anything, just don't get wrapped up in the bodybuilder routines. Train for functionality.
  10. Elite Member
    CopyCat's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  187 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Age
    34
    Posts
    6,254
    Rep Power
    719849
    Level
    58
    Lv. Percent
    46.69%
    Achievements Activity ProActivity AuthorityPosting ProPosting Authority

    Quote Originally Posted by CrushTheEnemy View Post
    I am on the job and am about the same size as you. If it were me i'd focus on the cardio and get my endurance up first. Military style PT is most likely what you'll be facing at an academy (push ups, pull ups, dips, crunches... and alot of running). Definatley get your endurance up, breathing after all is the most important factor once you have an SCBA on. There's nothing worse than a guy going down because he is out of breath, or the guy who sucks down a bottle in 2 minutes..... The people hiring you will def be impressed with a 3 mile run time of 18 mins , especially if they've worked some good fires in the past and know what it takes to keep trucking along. One thing that i noticed is after wearing all the gear for 3 months straight training you will beef up certain parts of your body, Back, shoulders,legs and neck ( that helmet isn't light at first ha ha ) I'm not saying don't try to put mass on, I just don't think it would be wise to not hit the cardio as hard in fear of losing mass, when the cardio is def going to be more important. Good luck
    See 2 posts above. It talks specifically about VO2 max and efficiency.
    ADVANCED MUSCLE SCIENCE
    Strongest On The Market
    RECOVERBRO: Est. Post #3222
  11. Elite Member
    CopyCat's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  187 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Age
    34
    Posts
    6,254
    Rep Power
    719849
    Level
    58
    Lv. Percent
    46.69%
    Achievements Activity ProActivity AuthorityPosting ProPosting Authority

    ^oops^ I didn't mean to make it look so big like I was upset about anything.
    ADVANCED MUSCLE SCIENCE
    Strongest On The Market
    RECOVERBRO: Est. Post #3222
  

  
 

Similar Forum Threads

  1. How to put out a fire
    By liquid in forum General Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-06-2009, 07:35 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-14-2007, 09:50 PM
  3. So Epistane still requires a SERM??
    By camaroguy18 in forum Supplements
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-30-2007, 08:30 AM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-19-2006, 11:03 AM
  5. FDA making law that requires scripts for vitamins!
    By kwyckemynd00 in forum General Chat
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 01-27-2005, 02:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Log in
Log in