We all know its true but water is soooo important! - AnabolicMinds.com

We all know its true but water is soooo important!

  1. Senior Member
    windwords7's Avatar
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    We all know its true but water is soooo important!


    Water- Drink up for better perfomance

    Dr. Phil Maffetone

    As odd as it seems, the most common nutritional deficiency in athletes is water.
    <P class=text>Many athletes are deficient in this important ergogenic nutrient that makes up about 60 percent of their bodies. When this percentage is lowered even slightly by dehydration, the result is poorly functioning muscles, blood and organs. Even a deficiency of less than 1 percent can bring on signs and symptoms of dysfunction.
    <P class=text>Water may be the only added ergogenic requirement during activities lasting up to about 60 to 90 minutes, depending upon the individual. In prolonged activities, sodium may be important, especially in hot environments. And carbohydrates may serve an added role in maintaining fat-burning during longer endurance workouts or competitions. But these do not replace the need for water.
    <P class=text>Many athletes do not drink enough water between and during workouts and races. This is especially true in those who perform very long workouts; in these athletes maintaining normal hydration is even more difficult.
    <P class=text>A young male athlete's body is typically 60 percent water, and may contain 42 kilograms (more than 92 pounds) of water. A female athlete's body is slightly less aqueous at 50 percent of total weight. Approximately, two-thirds of this water is in the intracellular areas - predominantly the muscles, with most of the remaining one-third in extracellular compartments in the blood.
    <P class=text>One problem is the inability to easily know when water intake is needed. Generally, athletes wait for their sense of thirst to signal that it's time to drink. However, thirst is sensed only after dehydration has started.
    <P class=text>Thirst is activated only when the total body-water level is reduced, and also by sodium levels. Even slight dehydration reduces the blood-plasma volume, which is really what triggers thirst. But thirst is sensed after dehydration is evident. More importantly, once you are dehydrated, it may take as much as 48 hours to properly rehydrate. This is why so many athletes, unknowingly, are in a constant state of dehydration.
    <P class=text>As blood volume becomes diminished, blood flow (along with oxygen and other nutrients) to the muscles is significantly reduced, rendering them less functional. This condition raises the heart rate. Many athletes who observe an elevation of resting heart rate, or a plateau or worsening in their aerobic function, are dehydrated. Their elevated heart rate forces them to slow the pace.
    <P class=text>In addition, the ability to expel heat, which is always accumulating during training (and especially racing) is diminished by dehydration since skin circulation is reduced. This elevates the body's core temperature, which further reduces performance. This situation can also be dangerous.

    <SPAN class=text>If you have a difficult time getting into the habit of drinking often, use the alarm or countdown timer on your chronograph watch. Set the alarm to remind you to drink every 60 to 90 minutes when at rest. During longer training efforts or races, you may wish to set the alarm on your watch to remind you to drink every 15 to 30 minutes, depending on your individual needs. </SPAN>

  2. New Member
    snakeman458's Avatar
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    see i knew i drank 2 gals a day for something. thanks ww7 great info. even though i spend a lot of time in the head.
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    Matthew D's Avatar
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    I think I actually saw an article that stated that over 75% of the US population stays dehydrated a majority of the time... Good Post Wind
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    Originally posted by Matthew D
    I think I actually saw an article that stated that over 75% of the US population stays dehydrated a majority of the time... Good Post Wind
    not suprised at all. my family, friends always asking me if im aight (having a gallon filled always in my car's back seat and always carrying arounda 20 fl oz bottle) from what i see with being around my family, i dont see them rarely drinking water unless its at a meal. Dehydration leads to so many other issues too. (mentioned throughout the article. one thats not really covered is digestion and having a "regular" movement. maybe this is why metamucil sales are so high )
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    Matthew D's Avatar
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    I get the same thing from some of the kids in my classes. why do you drink so much water?&nbsp; I think I have been asked that at least 100 time or more in just this first semester alone.. got to love the junior high kids...
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    Originally posted by Matthew D
    I get the same thing from some of the kids in my classes. why do you drink so much water?&nbsp; I think I have been asked that at least 100 time or more in just this first semester alone.. got to love the junior high kids...
    &nbsp;

    At work I have Mug 52oz Mac Daddy( I drink 3), people asking if I am drinking coffee, Tell them is for water! I wish you can see their face when I tell them&nbsp;it is water.&nbsp; I guess Mug like this will be good for beer
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    i may be the only one.. but i HATE water.. I dont know I always have for some reason.. i drink all I can but I have to choke it down... kinda sucks when you have to choke down almost a gallon of something you dont like a day... i also drink low-fat milk and orange juice to help get more water daily... any other drinks people like thats low in sugar? i think orange juice has just way to much sugar to drink more than a glass or 2 a day.. anything else people would suggest?

    &nbsp;
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    windwords7's Avatar
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    I would add a little lemon or lime bro. That usually does the trick!
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    heh trust me ive tried that.. makes it taste even worse!! i dunno im strange
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    Originally posted by Sanosuke
    heh trust me ive tried that.. makes it taste even worse!! i dunno im strange
    Yes you are!! I don't what to tell you then, just keep chokeing it down!
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    water has a taste? never heard of someone complain about the taste of water and not being able to drink it (not a knock on you....just hit me as odd cuz i've always thought water was a refreshing fluid, rather than a flavored liquid) dont know if there is a substitute then my friend....there is this thing called vita-water. (or something like that) that has a flavor, but is mainly water w/ added flavor and vitamins) Might want to give that sucka a whirl but cuz water is basically free or cheap (if you go spring water route), the vita-water might be costly (prob. like 75cents per bottle)
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    water does have`a taste.. if it didnt it would be like drinking air or something.. if it had no taste I wouldnt cringe after I finish gulping down a glass.. doesnt matter if its tap or bottled all is the same to me.. no matter Ill just keep chuging it down best I can.. that vita-water is way to expensive to drink a gallon a day
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    just a few dehydration studies for you guys to take a look at, if ya like
    ----

    Body mass changes and voluntary fluid intakes of elite level water polo players and swimmers.

    Cox GR, Broad EM, Riley MD, Burke LM.

    Australian Institute of Sport, Belconnen.

    Calculated sweat rates (measured by body mass changes) and voluntary fluid intakes were monitored in elite level water polo players and swimmers during normal exercise sessions to determine fluid requirements to maintain fluid balance, and the degree of fluid replacement of these athletes. Data were collected from training and competition sessions for male water polo players (n = 23) and training sessions only for swimmers (n = 20 females; n = 21 males). The calculated average sweat rate and fluid intake rate during training sessions for male water polo players was 287 ml/h and 142 ml/h, respectively, with a rate of 786 ml/h and 380 ml/h during matches. During training sessions for male swimmers, the calculated average sweat rate and fluid intake rate per kilometre was 138 ml/km and 155 ml/km, respectively; and for female swimmers, 107 ml/km and 95 ml/km. There was a wide individual variation in fluid intake and sweat loss of both water polo players and swimmers. Dehydration experienced by athletes in this study was less than typically reported for "land-based" athletes. Errors inherent in the technique used in this study are acknowledged and may be significant in the calculation of reported sweat losses and levels of fluid balance in aquatic athletes.
    ------------


    The critical level of water deficit causing a decrease in human exercise performance: a practical field study.

    Yoshida T, Takanishi T, Nakai S, Yorimoto A, Morimoto T.

    Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585, Japan, yoshida@hiei.kit.ac.jp

    To analyse the critical level of water deficit which causes a decrease in aerobic and anaerobic exercise performance, a step test score (STS) and 10 s maximal anaerobic power (MAP) output during cycling exercise were measured in two experiments (Ex-1, n=7, and Ex-2, n=9), before and after baseball practice, using subjects who played regularly. The measurements in both Ex-1 and Ex-2 were repeated under four conditions of fluid ingestion (FI) (FI of 80%, 60%, 40%, and 20% of the total sweat loss) on hot summer days. The subjects were allowed free access to a sports beverage, maintained at 10-15 degrees C, within any given FI condition during the exercise. The [mean (SEM)] duration of the exercise and the environmental conditions (wet bulb globe temperature) were similar between Ex-1 [3.52 (0.14) h and 29.2 (0.6) degrees C, respectively] and Ex-2 [3.82 (0.12) h and 29.2 (0.4) degrees C, respectively]. In both Ex-1 and Ex-2, the loss of body mass (Delta m(b)) increased significantly as FI decreased. In Ex-1, the STS significantly decreased ( P<0.05) at values of delta m(b) in excess of 2.4 (0.2)% (40%FI). In Ex-2, the MAP remained unchanged at values of delta m(b) up to 2.5 (0.3)% (40%FI), while the MAP significantly decreased ( P<0.05) at values of delta m(b) of 3.9 (0.2)% (20%FI). These results suggest that there is a critical level of water deficit at which a decrease in aerobic and anaerobic performance occurs, and that aerobic performance may be more adversely influenced by dehydration than anaerobic power output during exercise-induced dehydration.

    --------
    Caffeine, body fluid-electrolyte balance, and exercise performance.

    Armstrong LE.

    Departments of Kinesiology, Nutritional Sciences, and Physiology & Neurobiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-1110, USA.

    Recreational enthusiasts and athletes often are advised to abstain from consuming caffeinated beverages (CB). The dual purposes of this review are to (a) critique controlled investigations regarding the effects of caffeine on dehydration and exercise performance, and (b) ascertain whether abstaining from CB is scientifically and physiologically justifiable. The literature indicates that caffeine consumption stimulates a mild diuresis similar to water, but there is no evidence of a fluid-electrolyte imbalance that is detrimental to exercise performance or health. Investigations comparing caffeine (100-680 mg) to water or placebo seldom found a statistical difference in urine volume. In the 10 studies reviewed, consumption of a CB resulted in 0-84% retention of the initial volume ingested, whereas consumption of water resulted in 0-81% retention. Further, tolerance to caffeine reduces the likelihood that a detrimental fluid-electrolyte imbalance will occur. The scientific literature suggests that athletes and recreational enthusiasts will not incur detrimental fluid-electrolyte imbalances if they consume CB in moderation and eat a typical U.S. diet. Sedentary members of the general public should be a less risk than athletes because their fluid losses via sweating are smaller.
    --------------------


    The effects of rehydration on cycling performance after exercise-induced dehydration.

    Singh R, Brouns F, Kovacs E.

    Sports Science Unit, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan. rabindar@kck.usm.my

    The effects of 7.6% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) and placebos (P) on rehydration (R) after exercise-induced dehydration and on a subsequent time-trial (TT) of cycling performance were studied. Thirteen male subjects exercised in a thermally-controlled environment (28 degrees C, 63% RH) until 3% of their body weight was lost. After exercise, the subjects moved to a neutral environment (22 degrees C) and rested for 30 minutes prior to a 2-hour R period. During R, subjects were fed CES or P to a maximum volume of 120% of previous body mass loss at 0, 30, and 60 minutes, in bolus-doses of 50%, 40% and 30% respectively. After R, subjects performed a 1-hour TT with no further fluid intake. % R with CES was significantly higher than with P (70 +/- 3% vs 60 +/- 5%; p < 0.01). During the TT, blood glucose dropped in the CES group but not in the P group. It was found that, despite a more effective R with CES, the performance results did not differ between groups (65.1 +/- 2.2 minutes and 65.2 +/- 2.3 minutes for CES and P respectively). It is suggested that an insulin-mediated rebound effect on CHO metabolism during TT, in which no further CHO was supplied, nullified the benefits of rehydration.



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    WYD02's Avatar
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    LOLOL...I've never heard of anyone complain about the taste of water...hahha.. Well, everyone is unique I guess. You could try using crystal light. It uses splenda, so no added cals from sugars and its pretty much just a little bit of powder and the rest water. It comes in a bunch of flavors. This would be a better alternative to drinking OJ and milk all day, especially if you are trying to cut.

    WYD
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    heh... just buy a filter?
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    Originally posted by whosyourdaddy02
    LOLOL...I've never heard of anyone complain about the taste of water...hahha.. Well, everyone is unique I guess. You could try using crystal light. It uses splenda, so no added cals from sugars and its pretty much just a little bit of powder and the rest water. It comes in a bunch of flavors. This would be a better alternative to drinking OJ and milk all day, especially if you are trying to cut.

    WYD
    &nbsp;

    i like the taste of crystal light.. the only problem is i heard drinking like a gallon or so a day of it isnt good cause its aspartame.. is this true? if so is there some kind of mix that contains splenda maybe?
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    if crystal light is really not great for you i was thinking sugar free kool-aid then just mixing it with some splenda.. sound good?
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    aspartame and splenda might trigger a slight insulin response but nothing to really worry about for most people...
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    whats wrong w/crystal light? what about crystal light slurpees at 7-11?
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