Oh no...I'm on a roll....

  1. I am faster than 80% of all snakes
    Dwight Schrute's Avatar
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    Oh no...I'm on a roll....


    Is glucose/amino acid supplementation after exercise an aid to strength training?

    Williams AG, van den Oord M, Sharma A, Jones DA.

    Department of Sport, Health and Exercise, Staffordshire University, Stoke on Trent, UK. a.williams@staffs.ac.uk

    BACKGROUND: The precise timing of carbohydrate and amino acid ingestion relative to a bout of resistance exercise may modulate the training effect of the resistance exercise. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether regular glucose/amino acid supplementation immediately after resistance exercise could enhance the gain in muscle strength brought about by resistance training. METHODS: Seven untrained participants with a median age of 23 years and mean (SD) body mass 68.9 (13.5) kg resistance trained on a leg extension machine for five days a week for 10 weeks, using four sets of 10 repetitions. Alternate legs were trained on successive days, one leg each day. Subjects ingested either a supplement including 0.8 g glucose/kg and 0.2 g amino acids/kg, or placebo, on alternate training days immediately after training. Therefore the supplement was always ingested after training the same leg (supplement leg). Isometric, isokinetic, and 1 repetition maximum (RM) strength were measured before, during, and after training. Blood samples were analysed to determine the acute responses of insulin and glucose to resistance exercise and supplementation or placebo. RESULTS: Serum insulin concentration peaked 20 minutes after supplement ingestion at ninefold the placebo level, and remained significantly elevated for at least 80 minutes (p<0.01). Isometric, isokinetic, and 1 RM strength improved on both supplement and placebo legs (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in the gain in strength between the supplement leg and the placebo leg (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Regular glucose/amino acid supplementation immediately after resistance exercise is unlikely to enhance the gain in muscle strength brought about by resistance training.

    PMID: 11273972 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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    BCAA intake affects protein metabolism in muscle after but not during exercise in humans.

    Blomstrand E, Saltin B.

    Copenhagen Muscle Research Centre, Rigshospitalet, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. eva.blomstrand@ihs.se

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) or a placebo was given to seven subjects during 1 h of ergometer cycle exercise and a 2-h recovery period. Intake of BCAA did not influence the rate of exchange of the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine and phenylalanine, in the legs during exercise or the increase in their concentration in muscle. The increase was approximately 30% in both conditions. On the other hand, in the recovery period after exercise, a faster decrease in the muscle concentration of aromatic amino acids was found in the BCAA experiment (46% compared with 25% in the placebo condition). There was also a tendency to a smaller release (an average of 32%) of these amino acids from the legs during the 2-h recovery. The results suggest that BCAA have a protein-sparing effect during the recovery after exercise, either that protein synthesis has been stimulated and/or protein degradation has decreased, but the data during exercise are too variable to make any conclusions about the effects during exercise. The effect in the recovery period does not seem to be mediated by insulin.
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    here's one that might be of interest Bobo, hope you don't mind if I throw it in here... didn't want to make an individual thread for it, and you seem to be on a roll


    Minimal influence of carbohydrate ingestion on the immune response following acute resistance exercise.

    Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 2001 Jun;11(2):149-61


    Koch AJ, Potteiger JA, Chan MA, Benedict SH, Frey BB.

    Department of Health and Exercise Science, Truman State University, Kirksville, MO 63501-4221, USA.

    The effect of carbohydrate supplementation (CHO) on the lymphocyte response to acute resistance exercise was examined in 10 resistance-trained males. Subjects completed a randomized double-blind protocol with sessions separated by 14 days. The exercise session consisted of a high intensity, short rest interval squat workout. Subjects consumed 1.0 g a kg body mass(-1) CHO or an equal volume of placebo (PLC) 10 min prior to and 10 min following exercise. Blood was collected at rest (REST), immediately post exercise (POST), and at 1.5 hours and 4.0 hours of recovery, and analyzed for plasma glucose, serum cortisol, leukocyte subsets, and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. A significant Treatment 3 Time effect was observed for lymphocyte proliferation between CHO and PLC, but post hoc analyses revealed no between-treatment differences at any post-exercise time point. Lymphocyte proliferation was significantly depressed below REST at POST (-39.2% for PLC, -25.7% for CHO). Significant fluctuations in leukocyte subset trafficking were observed for both treatments at POST, 1.5 hours, and 4.0 hours. Plasma glucose was significantly increased POST in CHO compared to PLC. Cortisol was significantly increased from REST to POST in both treatments. These data support a minimal effect of carbohydrate ingestion on the lymphocyte response to high-intensity resistance exercise.
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    Originally posted by Bobo
    Is glucose/amino acid supplementation after exercise an aid to strength training?

    Williams AG, van den Oord M, Sharma A, Jones DA.

    Department of Sport, Health and Exercise, Staffordshire University, Stoke on Trent, UK. a.williams@staffs.ac.uk

    BACKGROUND: The precise timing of carbohydrate and amino acid ingestion relative to a bout of resistance exercise may modulate the training effect of the resistance exercise. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether regular glucose/amino acid supplementation immediately after resistance exercise could enhance the gain in muscle strength brought about by resistance training. METHODS: Seven untrained participants with a median age of 23 years and mean (SD) body mass 68.9 (13.5) kg resistance trained on a leg extension machine for five days a week for 10 weeks, using four sets of 10 repetitions. Alternate legs were trained on successive days, one leg each day. Subjects ingested either a supplement including 0.8 g glucose/kg and 0.2 g amino acids/kg, or placebo, on alternate training days immediately after training. Therefore the supplement was always ingested after training the same leg (supplement leg). Isometric, isokinetic, and 1 repetition maximum (RM) strength were measured before, during, and after training. Blood samples were analysed to determine the acute responses of insulin and glucose to resistance exercise and supplementation or placebo. RESULTS: Serum insulin concentration peaked 20 minutes after supplement ingestion at ninefold the placebo level, and remained significantly elevated for at least 80 minutes (p&lt;0.01). Isometric, isokinetic, and 1 RM strength improved on both supplement and placebo legs (p&lt;0.05). There were no significant differences in the gain in strength between the supplement leg and the placebo leg (p&gt;0.05). CONCLUSION: Regular glucose/amino acid supplementation immediately after resistance exercise is unlikely to enhance the gain in muscle strength brought about by resistance training.

    PMID: 11273972 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    Seven untrained participants

    Alternate legs were trained on successive days, one leg each day.

    0.8 g glucose/kg =.36 gm per lb bw

    0.2 g amino acids/kg=.09 gm per lb bw

    Bobo, YOU know what you are doing, but these studies are worthless. You give a group of 7 untrained non athletes a fraction of the protein/glucose used by a body builder and train one weany leg per day...... Then come to a conclusion. Pleeeease. Give me as break. I think if I see another goofy pubmed study, I will puke. I agree with what you are preaching. You're just using the wong studies with nonsensical parameters to reinforce your conclusions.
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    Originally posted by Bobo
    BCAA intake affects protein metabolism in muscle after but not during exercise in humans.

    Blomstrand E, Saltin B.

    Copenhagen Muscle Research Centre, Rigshospitalet, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. eva.blomstrand@ihs.se

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) or a placebo was given to seven subjects during 1 h of ergometer cycle exercise and a 2-h recovery period. Intake of BCAA did not influence the rate of exchange of the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine and phenylalanine, in the legs during exercise or the increase in their concentration in muscle. The increase was approximately 30% in both conditions. On the other hand, in the recovery period after exercise, a faster decrease in the muscle concentration of aromatic amino acids was found in the BCAA experiment (46% compared with 25% in the placebo condition). There was also a tendency to a smaller release (an average of 32%) of these amino acids from the legs during the 2-h recovery. The results suggest that BCAA have a protein-sparing effect during the recovery after exercise, either that protein synthesis has been stimulated and/or protein degradation has decreased, but the data during exercise are too variable to make any conclusions about the effects during exercise. The effect in the recovery period does not seem to be mediated by insulin.
    ergometer cycle exercise
    cardio can not be compared in any respect to a serious weight lifting session
    Intake of BCAA did not influence the rate of exchange of the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine and phenylalanine
    BCAA supplementation is not supposed to influence THOSE amino acids. It's supposed to insure an adequate supply of Leucine, Isoleucine and Valine throughout the workout insuring the body is not depleted of these 3 aminos and remains anabolic until the post-workout meal. BCAA's do this quite handily, I might add.

  6. I am faster than 80% of all snakes
    Dwight Schrute's Avatar
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    Originally posted by John Benz

    Seven untrained participants

    Alternate legs were trained on successive days, one leg each day.

    0.8 g glucose/kg =.36 gm per lb bw

    0.2 g amino acids/kg=.09 gm per lb bw

    Bobo, YOU know what you are doing, but these studies are worthless. You give a group of 7 untrained non athletes a fraction of the protein/glucose used by a body builder and train one weany leg per day...... Then come to a conclusion. Pleeeease. Give me as break. I think if I see another goofy pubmed study, I will puke. I agree with what you are preaching. You're just using the wong studies with nonsensical parameters to reinforce your conclusions.
    .8g and .2g were combined together vs. the placebo group.

    "Seven untrained participants with a median age of 23 years and mean (SD) body mass 68.9 (13.5) kg resistance trained on a leg extension machine for five days a week for 10 weeks, using four sets of 10 repetitions. Alternate legs were trained on successive days, one leg each day. Subjects ingested either a supplement including 0.8 g glucose/kg and 0.2 g amino acids/kg, or placebo"

    There was no significance between the two results.

    The study was conducted for 10 weeks. Whether untrained or not, it is still significant. In fact, the growth should be more since they were untrained.
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  7. I am faster than 80% of all snakes
    Dwight Schrute's Avatar
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    Originally posted by John Benz

    ergometer cycle exercise
    cardio can not be compared in any respect to a serious weight lifting session
    Intake of BCAA did not influence the rate of exchange of the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine and phenylalanine
    BCAA supplementation is not supposed to influence THOSE amino acids. It's supposed to insure an adequate supply of Leucine, Isoleucine and Valine throughout the workout insuring the body is not depleted of these 3 aminos and remains anabolic until the post-workout meal. BCAA's do this quite handily, I might add.

    That was just an observation. And actually cardio is more reliant on glucose stores than weight lifting. There is a protein and muscle sparing effect with resistance training. There is not wikth cardio. It reinforces my arguement that high amounts of insulin are not necessary.

    "The results suggest that BCAA have a protein-sparing effect during the recovery after exercise, either that protein synthesis has been stimulated and/or protein degradation has decreased, but the data during exercise are too variable to make any conclusions about the effects during exercise. The effect in the recovery period does not seem to be mediated by insulin. "
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