Fat Loss Supps, your thoughts and opinions.

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  1. one of our sponser sells albuterol. dig deeper.


  2. little bit about me i was working out none stop lost weight at 16 lost 60 pounds kept it off for 8 yrs . then mom died and i went into a depression gained 50 pounds then went to school because of stress gained 30 more . all along over 8 yrs tryed trainers supplements, wws, jenny,hypnosis, only thing worked was t3 and cytomel lost 30 but gained back yr later
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  3. what is sesamin never heard of it before until in here and lipoultra can i get these at gnc ?

  4. Quote Originally Posted by jim brooks
    what is sesamin never heard of it before until in here and lipoultra can i get these at gnc ?
    Sure, if you want to spend a small fortune.

    www.bulknutrition.com
    Look up avantlab products.

  5. thanks for helping me bro . i have a ? if i take superdrol 20 mgs with albuterol 12 will i gain weight because of the superdrol ? i will do 1800 cal and cardio
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  6. If you are interestd in a seasamin product- I'd get the Scivation product. Nutraplanet has it on sale for like $26.

    I wouldn't run Superdrol at 1800 cals. IMO, that would be a waste. It seems to work bette at high cals with enough carbs. I doubt you could get 1800 cals and enough carbs to make SD effective.

    And there is a chance you would gain a small amount of weight on SD and albuterol.

  7. thanks for the info

  8. thought this may be of interest:

    FDA may make first weight-loss pill available over the counter
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A prescription diet drug that blocks the absorption of fat is "no magic pill" but will nevertheless help control calorie intake, the drug manufacturer said Monday as the Food and Drug Administration considered whether to approve the pill for over-the-counter sales.

    In 1999, the regulatory agency approved orlistat, marketed as Xenical, for sale as a prescription drug. The drug blocks the absorption of fat the first weight-loss drug it has approved for over-the-counter sales.

    Now, GlaxoSmithKline Consumer health care seeks to sell an over-the-counter version of the pill.

    "There is no magic pill for weight loss and orlistat is not a magic pill. Orlistat is a tool that will help people control their calorie intake and modify their diet," said John Dent, the pharmaceutical company's senior vice president of research and development.

    That proposed version, called Alli (pronounced "ally"), would contain half the dose of the prescription capsule. Two FDA advisory committees were to vote on recommending approval late Monday.

    The agency usually follows the non-binding recommendations of its outside panels of experts.

    An earlier, internal FDA review found the drug is a "safe and effective weight loss agent," but held off on concluding whether it should be sold without a prescription. The review found that over-the-counter use of the drug could lead to vitamin deficiencies and encourage abuse.

    On Monday, FDA panel members questioned whether consumers would be able to distinguish Alli from non-approved dietary supplements also sold as weight-loss aids. They also expressed concern about its effect on vitamin intake.

    When taken with meals, the drug blocks the absorption of about one-quarter of any fat consumed. That fat is passed out of the body in stools, which can be loose or oily as a result. Other side effects include gas, incontinence and oily spotting. About half of patients in trials experienced such side effects, the company said.

    In six-month clinical trials, obese people who took orlistat lost on average 5.3 pounds to 6.2 pounds more than did those who were given dummy pills, according to FDA documents. The drug's effect on weight loss is "gradual and modest," said Steve Burton, Glaxo's vice president of weight control.

    The primary concern of FDA reviewers was the drug's potential to create vitamin deficiencies, since its use also blocks absorption of fat-soluble vitamins like D, E, K and beta-carotene. The company has recommended patients take multivitamins when using the drug.

    However, at least 47% of people ignored that advice in drug trials. Furthermore, just 35% of diabetes patients in a study correctly stated the drug was inappropriate for them, according to FDA documents.

    Those sort of results worried FDA reviewers, who questioned the risk of selling the drug directly to consumers "without the principal involvement of a learned intermediary," or prescribing doctor.

    The reviewers also showed concern about the increased potential for abuse or misuse of a prescription-free version of the drug, especially among bulimics or binge-eaters who could develop vitamin deficiencies due to chronic use. The company said there was a "very low" potential for abuse.

    British-owned GlaxoSmithKline's U.S. operations are based in Philadelphia and Research Triangle Park, N.C.

    article was found in USA Tody: http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/...tm?POE=NEWISVA

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Hank Vangut
    thought this may be of interest:

    FDA may make first weight-loss pill available over the counter
    WASHINGTON (AP) A prescription diet drug that blocks the absorption of fat is "no magic pill" but will nevertheless help control calorie intake, the drug manufacturer said Monday as the Food and Drug Administration considered whether to approve the pill for over-the-counter sales.

    In 1999, the regulatory agency approved orlistat, marketed as Xenical, for sale as a prescription drug. The drug blocks the absorption of fat the first weight-loss drug it has approved for over-the-counter sales.

    Now, GlaxoSmithKline Consumer health care seeks to sell an over-the-counter version of the pill.

    "There is no magic pill for weight loss and orlistat is not a magic pill. Orlistat is a tool that will help people control their calorie intake and modify their diet," said John Dent, the pharmaceutical company's senior vice president of research and development.

    That proposed version, called Alli (pronounced "ally"), would contain half the dose of the prescription capsule. Two FDA advisory committees were to vote on recommending approval late Monday.

    The agency usually follows the non-binding recommendations of its outside panels of experts.

    An earlier, internal FDA review found the drug is a "safe and effective weight loss agent," but held off on concluding whether it should be sold without a prescription. The review found that over-the-counter use of the drug could lead to vitamin deficiencies and encourage abuse.

    On Monday, FDA panel members questioned whether consumers would be able to distinguish Alli from non-approved dietary supplements also sold as weight-loss aids. They also expressed concern about its effect on vitamin intake.

    When taken with meals, the drug blocks the absorption of about one-quarter of any fat consumed. That fat is passed out of the body in stools, which can be loose or oily as a result. Other side effects include gas, incontinence and oily spotting. About half of patients in trials experienced such side effects, the company said.

    In six-month clinical trials, obese people who took orlistat lost on average 5.3 pounds to 6.2 pounds more than did those who were given dummy pills, according to FDA documents. The drug's effect on weight loss is "gradual and modest," said Steve Burton, Glaxo's vice president of weight control.

    The primary concern of FDA reviewers was the drug's potential to create vitamin deficiencies, since its use also blocks absorption of fat-soluble vitamins like D, E, K and beta-carotene. The company has recommended patients take multivitamins when using the drug.

    However, at least 47% of people ignored that advice in drug trials. Furthermore, just 35% of diabetes patients in a study correctly stated the drug was inappropriate for them, according to FDA documents.

    Those sort of results worried FDA reviewers, who questioned the risk of selling the drug directly to consumers "without the principal involvement of a learned intermediary," or prescribing doctor.

    The reviewers also showed concern about the increased potential for abuse or misuse of a prescription-free version of the drug, especially among bulimics or binge-eaters who could develop vitamin deficiencies due to chronic use. The company said there was a "very low" potential for abuse.

    British-owned GlaxoSmithKline's U.S. operations are based in Philadelphia and Research Triangle Park, N.C.

    article was found in USA Tody: http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/...tm?POE=NEWISVA
    Ive been in NY-Long Island area allweek and that is all i haveeard about ( on the radio & nes channels). I'm so sick of hearing about it. If it works so well as a script, why havent many of us heard about it? Now they want to lower the dose andsell it OTC? I doubt its going to have any more of an effect than it does script. & you'll always have soem idoit up his/he dose and have some adverse sides to it causing manufactures to pull it from the shelves again.

    besides, i heard all it does it make u **** water and blow gas all day. literally!! lol, WTF! Just another overly hyped out script turned OCT that will do nothing for America's obese.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by SprtNvolcoM
    Ive been in NY-Long Island area allweek and that is all i haveeard about ( on the radio & nes channels). I'm so sick of hearing about it. If it works so well as a script, why havent many of us heard about it? Now they want to lower the dose andsell it OTC? I doubt its going to have any more of an effect than it does script. & you'll always have soem idoit up his/he dose and have some adverse sides to it causing manufactures to pull it from the shelves again.

    besides, i heard all it does it make u **** water and blow gas all day. literally!! lol, WTF! Just another overly hyped out script turned OCT that will do nothing for America's obese.

    It works okay for people who won't control their diet. For BBing its pretty close to worthless.

  11. QUESTION: Say I wantd to try a different dermal in the future. From your experiences, which is better ...

    Skulpt

    Liposolv



    EDIT: PLEASE READ THE FAQ ABOUT SPONSORS.

  12. I guess I'll stick tot he lipoderm-ultra i have been using. I dont experience any problems with it what so ever. It alsp helped contribute to a 2.75inch lose from my waste in my recent DNP cycle. So no need to switch things up when your current dermal is working fine.

    Thanks for that reply thouhg. Interesting read.
    Sprt
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