Low GI Post workout drink, really???

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    Low GI Post workout drink, really???


    Bobo's gonna hate me for this but, after reading and debating the Hi vs Low GI post WO drink I decided to do some investigation of my own and I'm now more confused than ever. After reading the two studies produced by Bobo in another thread they where "The effects of simple-carbohydrate (CHO)- and complex-CHO-rich diets on skeletal muscle glycogen content were compared" and "The effect of free glutamine and peptide ingestion on the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis in man.". However after closer investigation I realize these may have been misinterrepted.

    First, in the study of complex vs simple CHO, this study was conducted over a 3 day time where no resistance training was involved and glycogen depletion was only achieved from a previous 3 day low carb diet. Now this may speak in terms of types of CHO to use in ones regular diet but I don't think this is a good claim to a low GI post workout drink.

    Second, in the study of glycogen resysnthesis, it was claimed that resysnthesis was the same in the whey/wheat group as the glucose/glutamine group, but what I think may have been overlooked was that they ALL consumed the same amount of glucose with their respective drinks and now GI level is given. To me this only proves that the addition of protein to a post workout shake has no effect on glycogen resysnthesis.

    Now I decide to grab a few studies that do show a difference in a low vs high GI post workout drink, these are:

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    Sports Med 1997 Mar;23(3):164-72 Related Articles, Links


    Glycaemic index and optimal performance.

    Walton P, Rhodes EC.

    School of Human Kinetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

    It is widely documented that athletes should consume carbohydrates prior to, during and after exercise. Ingestion of carbohydrates at these times will optimise performance and recovery. In spite of this knowledge, there is a paucity of information available to athletes concerning the types of carbohydrate foods to select. Therefore, it is suggested that the glycaemic index may be an important resource when selecting an ideal carbohydrate. The glycaemic index categories foods containing carbohydrates according to the blood glucose response that they elicit. Carbohydrate foods evoking the greatest responses are considered to be high glycaemic index foods, while those producing a relatively smaller response are categorised as low glycaemic index foods. Athletes wishing to consume carbohydrates 30 to 60 minutes before exercise should be encouraged to ingest low glycaemic index foods. Consuming these types of foods will decrease the likelihood of creating hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia at the onset of exercise, while providing exogenous carbohydrate throughout exercise. It is recommended that high glycaemic index foods be consumed during exercise. These foods will ensure rapid digestion and absorption, which will lead to elevated blood glucose levels during exercise. Post-exercise meals should consist of high glycaemic index carbohydrates. Low glycaemic foods do not induce adequate muscle glycogen resynthesis compared with high glycaemic index foods.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Int J Sports Med 1996 Jul;17(5):373-8 Related Articles, Links


    The influence of starch structure on glycogen resynthesis and subsequent cycling performance.

    Jozsi AC, Trappe TA, Starling RD, Goodpaster B, Trappe SW, Fink WJ, Costill DL.

    Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana 47306, USA.

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of starch structure on muscle glycogen resynthesis and cycling performance. Eight male cyclists (22 +/- 1 yr) completed an exercise protocol (DP) to decrease vastus lateralis glycogen concentration. This exercise consisted of 60 min cycling at 75% VO2max, followed by six 1-min sprints at approximately 125% VO2max with 1 min rest intervals. In the 12 hr after the exercise each subject consumed approximately 3000 kcal (65:20:15% carbohydrate, fat and protein). All of the carbohydrate (CHO) consumed was derived from one of four solutions; 1) glucose, 2) maltodextrin (glucose polymer), 3) waxy starch (100% amylopectin), or 4) resistant starch (100% amylose). Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle after DP and 24 hr later to determine glycogen concentrations. A 30 min cycling time trial (TT) was performed following the 24 hr post-DP muscle biopsy to examine the influence of the feeding regimen on total work output. The post-DP glycogen concentrations were similar among the four trials, ranging from 220.3 +/- 29.2 to 264 +/- 48.3 mmol.kg-1 dry weight (d.w.) muscle. Twenty-four hours after DP, muscle glycogen concentration had increased less (p < 0.05) in the resistant starch trial (+90.8 +/- 12.8 mmol.kg-1 d.w.) than in the glucose (+197.7 +/- 31.6 mmol.kg-1 d.w.), maltodextrin (+136.7 +/- 24.5 mmol.kg-1 d.w.) and waxy starch (+171.8 +/- 37.1 mmol.kg-1 d.w.) trials. There were no differences in total work output during the TT, or blood lactate concentration immediately following the TT in any of the CHO trials. In summary, glycogen resynthesis was attenuated following ingestion of starch with a high amylose content, relative to amylopectin or glucose; however, short duration time trial performance was unaffected.

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    Aust J Sci Med Sport 1997 Mar;29(1):3-10 Related Articles, Links


    Nutrition for post-exercise recovery.

    Burke LM.

    Australian Institute of Sport, ACT, Australia.

    Recovery after exercise poses an important challenge to the modern athlete. Important issues include restoration of liver and muscle glycogen stores, and the replacement of fluid and electrolytes lost in sweat. Rapid resynthesis of muscle glycogen stores is aided by the immediate intake of carbohydrate (I g.kg-1 BM each 2 hours), particularly of high glycemic index carbohydrate foods, leading to a total intake over 24 hours of 7-10 g.kg-1 BM. Provided adequate carbohydrate is consumed it appears that the frequency of intake, the form (liquid versus solid) and the presence of other macronutrients does not affect the rate of glycogen storage. Practical considerations, such as the availability and appetite appeal of foods or drinks, and gastrointestinal comfort may determine ideal carbohydrate choices and intake patterns. Rehydration requires a special fluid intake plan since thirst and voluntary intake will not provide for full restoration of sweat losses in the acute phase (0-6 hr) of recovery. Steps should be taken to ensure that a supply of palatable drinks is available after exercise. Sweetened drinks are generally preferred and can contribute towards achieving carbohydrate intake goals. Replacement of sodium lost in sweat is important in maximising the retention of ingested fluids. A sodium content of 50-90 mmol.L-1 may be necessary for optimal rehydration; however commercial sports drinks are formulated with a more moderate sodium content (10-25 mmol.L-1). It may be necessary to consume 150% of fluid losses to allow for complete fluid restoration. Caffeine and alcohol containing beverages are not ideal rehydration fluids since they promote an increased rate of diuresis.
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    Int J Sports Med 1998 Jun;19 Suppl 2:S142-5 Related Articles, Links


    Glycogen resynthesis after exercise: effect of carbohydrate intake.

    Ivy JL.

    Department of Kinesiology, University of Texas, Austin 78712, USA. JohnIvy@mail.utexas.edu

    To maximize glycogen resynthesis after exercise, a carbohydrate supplement in excess of 1.0 g x kg(-1) body wt should be consumed immediately after competition or a training bout. Continuation of supplementation every two hours will maintain a rapid rate of storage up to six hours post exercise. Supplements composed of glucose or glucose polymers are the most effective for replenishment of muscle glycogen, whereas fructose is most beneficial for the replenishment of liver glycogen. The addition of protein to a carbohydrate supplement may also increase the rate of glycogen storage due to the ability of protein and carbohydrate to act synergistically on insulin secretion.

    PMID: 9694422 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Now there are quite a few others but I'll stop there for now. Now I'm not arguing that a diet that consist of mainly low GI foods is not benificial in reduce overall fat storage but I can't say I'm in away convinced that a low GI post workout drink is as effective as a high GI one.

    Sorry to bring this up again but I just want to make sure I'm getting the most out of my post WO drink and I'm not sure that low GI is the way to go. Please, let me know if I'm missing something here.

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    Originally posted by Draven
    Bobo's gonna hate me for this but, after reading and debating the Hi vs Low GI post WO drink I decided to do some investigation of my own and I'm now more confused than ever. After reading the two studies produced by Bobo in another thread they where &quot;The effects of simple-carbohydrate (CHO)- and complex-CHO-rich diets on skeletal muscle glycogen content were compared&quot; and &quot;The effect of free glutamine and peptide ingestion on the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis in man.&quot;. However after closer investigation I realize these may have been misinterrepted.

    First, in the study of complex vs simple CHO, this study was conducted over a 3 day time where no resistance training was involved and glycogen depletion was only achieved from a previous 3 day low carb diet. Now this may speak in terms of types of CHO to use in ones regular diet but I don't think this is a good claim to a low GI post workout drink.

    Second, in the study of glycogen resysnthesis, it was claimed that resysnthesis was the same in the whey/wheat group as the glucose/glutamine group, but what I think may have been overlooked was that they ALL consumed the same amount of glucose with their respective drinks and now GI level is given. To me this only proves that the addition of protein to a post workout shake has no effect on glycogen resysnthesis.

    The study that compared diets compared full depletion vs. non-depleted. The non-depleted didn't really say anything but the fully depleted athletes showed their was no differend. Whether mnuscle glycogen is depleted one way or the other doesn't really matter. The point is to fill mucsle glycogen to faciliate muscle growth. Its howed there was no difference.


    As for the second study the addition of wheat/whey lowers the GI. The GI of a glucose/glutamine drink wasn't any signinficant that a glucose/whey/wheat mixture. In other words, the lower GI drink did as well.
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    Originally posted by Draven
    To me this only proves that the addition of protein to a post workout shake has no effect on glycogen resysnthesis.

    Carbohydrate-protein complex increases the rate of muscle glycogen storage after exercise.

    Zawadzki KM, Yaspelkis BB 3rd, Ivy JL.

    Department of Kinesiology, University of Texas, Austin 78712.

    Carbohydrate, protein, and carbohydrate-protein supplements were compared to determine their effects on muscle glycogen storage during recovery from prolonged exhaustive exercise. Nine male subjects cycled for 2 h on three separate occasions to deplete their muscle glycogen stores. Immediately and 2 h after each exercise bout, they ingested 112.0 g carbohydrate (CHO), 40.7 g protein (PRO), or 112.0 g carbohydrate and 40.7 g protein (CHO-PRO). Blood samples were drawn before exercise, immediately after exercise, and throughout recovery. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis immediately and 4 h after exercise. During recovery the plasma glucose response of the CHO treatment was significantly greater than that of the CHO-PRO treatment, but the plasma insulin response of the CHO-PRO treatment was significantly greater than that of the CHO treatment. Both the CHO and CHO-PRO treatments produced plasma glucose and insulin responses that were greater than those produced by the PRO treatment (P less than 0.05). The rate of muscle glycogen storage during the CHO-PRO treatment [35.5 +/- 3.3 (SE) mumol.g protein-1.h-1] was significantly faster than during the CHO treatment (25.6 +/- 2.3 mumol.g protein-1.h-1), which was significantly faster than during the PRO treatment (7.6 +/- 1.4 mumol.g protein-1.h-1). The results suggest that postexercise muscle glycogen storage can be enhanced with a carbohydrate-protein supplement as a result of the interaction of carbohydrate and protein on insulin secretion
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    dammit bobo, ya low gi carbin' s.o.b... you may have me rethinking my **** here... still researchin', will throw more studies up when I find some good ones, but I like the overall concept (preworkout low gi carbs to help facilitate non requirement of post w/o spike, etc)
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    Originally posted by Biggin
    dammit bobo, ya low gi carbin' s.o.b... you may have me rethinking my **** here... still researchin', will throw more studies up when I find some good ones, but I like the overall concept (preworkout low gi carbs to help facilitate non requirement of post w/o spike, etc)
    I never said High GI doesn't work. I just stated that this can be acheived with the combination of a carb/protein mixture. This has been showed to increase the insulin response. With the study comparingdiets on fully depleted athletes and this showing that the resynthesis wasn't any different, I conclude that a low-mod (oatmeal) in combination with a protein source is significant enough to promote muscle growth without the excess glucose you will get with a high amount of High GI carbs. This in essence is my THEORY and using it in real life has proven very beneficial.
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    Re: Re: Low GI Post workout drink, really???


    Originally posted by Bobo

    As for the second study the addition of wheat/whey lowers the GI. The GI of a glucose/glutamine drink wasn't any signinficant that a glucose/whey/wheat mixture. In other words, the lower GI drink did as well.
    well according to the American Diabetes Association ""Adding protein does not slow the rate of absorption," she [Marion Franz] stated, and protein also does not prevent late hypoglycemia, so that this common recommendation is no longer accepted. -- 2002 American Diabetes Association Annual Meeting, 14-18 June 2002.". Therefore the wheat/whey does not lower the overall GI.

    Also "We used to think that the protein would help slow down the carb absorption, but it is more likely the fat content (that often goes along with most proteins from animal sources) that slows the absorption of the other food nutrients. Also, the more fat contained with the proteins, the slower the whole digestion process. " http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/...2/d_0d_69f.htm

    I'm sure if we looked hard we could probably find studies to back this. You see now why I am not totaly convinced.
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    Re: Re: Low GI Post workout drink, really???


    Originally posted by Bobo


    Carbohydrate-protein complex increases the rate of muscle glycogen storage after exercise.

    Zawadzki KM, Yaspelkis BB 3rd, Ivy JL.

    Department of Kinesiology, University of Texas, Austin 78712.

    Carbohydrate, protein, and carbohydrate-protein supplements were compared to determine their effects on muscle glycogen storage during recovery from prolonged exhaustive exercise. Nine male subjects cycled for 2 h on three separate occasions to deplete their muscle glycogen stores. Immediately and 2 h after each exercise bout, they ingested 112.0 g carbohydrate (CHO), 40.7 g protein (PRO), or 112.0 g carbohydrate and 40.7 g protein (CHO-PRO). Blood samples were drawn before exercise, immediately after exercise, and throughout recovery. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis immediately and 4 h after exercise. During recovery the plasma glucose response of the CHO treatment was significantly greater than that of the CHO-PRO treatment, but the plasma insulin response of the CHO-PRO treatment was significantly greater than that of the CHO treatment. Both the CHO and CHO-PRO treatments produced plasma glucose and insulin responses that were greater than those produced by the PRO treatment (P less than 0.05). The rate of muscle glycogen storage during the CHO-PRO treatment [35.5 +/- 3.3 (SE) mumol.g protein-1.h-1] was significantly faster than during the CHO treatment (25.6 +/- 2.3 mumol.g protein-1.h-1), which was significantly faster than during the PRO treatment (7.6 +/- 1.4 mumol.g protein-1.h-1). The results suggest that postexercise muscle glycogen storage can be enhanced with a carbohydrate-protein supplement as a result of the interaction of carbohydrate and protein on insulin secretion

    Hmm this says otherwise though:


    Muscle glycogen recovery after exercise measured by 13C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in humans: effect of nutritional solutions.

    Rotman S, Slotboom J, Kreis R, Boesch C, Jequier E.

    Department of Life Sciences, Nestle Research Center, Lausanne, Switzerland.

    The rate of glycogen resynthesis in human skeletal muscle after glycogen-depleting exercise is known to depend on carbohydrate intake and is reported to reach a plateau after an adequate amount of carbohydrate (CHO) consumption. Efforts to maximize the rate of glycogen storage by changing the type and form of CHO, as well as by adding proteins or lipids have yielded inconsistent results. The objective of this study was to assess whether isocaloric addition of proteins and arginine to a CHO diet in the first 4 h after an endurance exercise would increase the rate of glycogen synthesis. The CHO solution, given twice at a 2 h interval according to earlier optimized protocols, contained 1.7 g CHO/kg(body weieght) The effects of this solution were compared to those of an isocaloric solution containing 1.2 g CHO/kg(body weight) plus 0.5 g protein/kg(body weight) (including 5 g arginine). Glycogen was measured in quadriceps muscle in vivo with natural abundance 13C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy before exercise and twice after exercise, before and at the end of a 4-h period following the intake of one of the solutions. Eight subjects took part in a randomized cross-over trial separated by at least 1 week. Glycogen synthesis was found to be significantly increased with both regimes compared to a zero-caloric placebo diet, but no significant difference in glycogen resynthesis was found between the CHO-only diet and the one supplemented by proteins and arginine. It is estimated that significance would have been reached for an increase of 34%, while the effectively measured synthesis rates only differed by 5%.
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    Influence of differing macronutrient intakes on muscle glycogen resynthesis after resistance exercise.

    Roy BD, Tarnopolsky MA.

    Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1.

    The provision of additional protein (Pro) to a carbohydrate (CHO) supplement resulted in an enhanced rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis after endurance exercise (Zawadzki et al., J. Appl. Physiol. 72: 1854-1859, 1992). A comparison of isoenergetic CHO and CHO/Pro formula drinks on muscle glycogen resynthesis has not been examined after either endurance or resistance exercise. We studied the effect of isoenergetic CHO (1 g/kg) and CHO/Pro/fat (66% CHO, 23% Pro, 11% fat) defined formula drinks and placebo (Pl) given immediately (t = 0 h) and 1 h (t = +1 h) after resistance exercise in 10 healthy young men. They performed a whole body workout (9 exercises/3 sets at 80% 1 repetition maximum) with unilateral knee extension exercise [exercise (Ex) and control (Con) leg]. The CHO/Pro/fat and CHO trials resulted in significantly greater (P < 0. 05) plasma insulin and glucose concentration compared with Pl. Muscle glycogen was significantly lower (P < 0.05) for the Ex vs. Con leg immediately postexercise for all three conditions. The rate of glycogen resynthesis was significantly greater (P < 0.05) for both CHO/Pro/fat and CHO (23.0 +/- 4.5 and 19.3 +/- 6.1 mmol . kg dry muscle-1 . h-1, respectively) vs. Pl (Ex = 2.8 +/- 2.3 and Con = 1.4 +/- 3.6 mmol . kg dry muscle-1 . h-1). These results demonstrated that a bout of resistance exercise resulted in a significant decrease in muscle glycogen and that consumption of an isoenergetic CHO or CHO/Pro/fat formula drink resulted in similar rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis after resistance exercise. This suggests that total energy content and CHO content are important in the resynthesis of muscle glycogen.

    Publication Types:
    Clinical Trial
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    PMID: 9480948 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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    Originally posted by Bobo


    I never said High GI doesn't work. I just stated that this can be acheived with the combination of a carb/protein mixture.
    yeh I know, wasn't implying you said it didn't work, but if I can achieve the same results without pounding fast acting sugar and keep my diet even keel throughout the day, that would be more optimal
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    Re: Re: Re: Low GI Post workout drink, really???


    Originally posted by Draven



    Hmm this says otherwise though:


    Muscle glycogen recovery after exercise measured by 13C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in humans: effect of nutritional solutions.

    Rotman S, Slotboom J, Kreis R, Boesch C, Jequier E.

    Department of Life Sciences, Nestle Research Center, Lausanne, Switzerland.

    The rate of glycogen resynthesis in human skeletal muscle after glycogen-depleting exercise is known to depend on carbohydrate intake and is reported to reach a plateau after an adequate amount of carbohydrate (CHO) consumption. Efforts to maximize the rate of glycogen storage by changing the type and form of CHO, as well as by adding proteins or lipids have yielded inconsistent results. The objective of this study was to assess whether isocaloric addition of proteins and arginine to a CHO diet in the first 4 h after an endurance exercise would increase the rate of glycogen synthesis. The CHO solution, given twice at a 2 h interval according to earlier optimized protocols, contained 1.7 g CHO/kg(body weieght) The effects of this solution were compared to those of an isocaloric solution containing 1.2 g CHO/kg(body weight) plus 0.5 g protein/kg(body weight) (including 5 g arginine). Glycogen was measured in quadriceps muscle in vivo with natural abundance 13C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy before exercise and twice after exercise, before and at the end of a 4-h period following the intake of one of the solutions. Eight subjects took part in a randomized cross-over trial separated by at least 1 week. Glycogen synthesis was found to be significantly increased with both regimes compared to a zero-caloric placebo diet, but no significant difference in glycogen resynthesis was found between the CHO-only diet and the one supplemented by proteins and arginine. It is estimated that significance would have been reached for an increase of 34%, while the effectively measured synthesis rates only differed by 5%.
    Well the carb mixture was 1.7g/kg. Thats an awful lot. I dont think anyone realistically takes that much. Also the study I posted stated that muscle glycogen storage is enhanced, not glycogen resythesis. Glycogen synbthesis will happen with any carbohydrate but the muscle gycogen storage is increased adding a protein.
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    Originally posted by Draven
    Influence of differing macronutrient intakes on muscle glycogen resynthesis after resistance exercise.

    Roy BD, Tarnopolsky MA.

    Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1.

    The provision of additional protein (Pro) to a carbohydrate (CHO) supplement resulted in an enhanced rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis after endurance exercise (Zawadzki et al., J. Appl. Physiol. 72: 1854-1859, 1992). A comparison of isoenergetic CHO and CHO/Pro formula drinks on muscle glycogen resynthesis has not been examined after either endurance or resistance exercise. We studied the effect of isoenergetic CHO (1 g/kg) and CHO/Pro/fat (66% CHO, 23% Pro, 11% fat) defined formula drinks and placebo (Pl) given immediately (t = 0 h) and 1 h (t = +1 h) after resistance exercise in 10 healthy young men. They performed a whole body workout (9 exercises/3 sets at 80% 1 repetition maximum) with unilateral knee extension exercise [exercise (Ex) and control (Con) leg]. The CHO/Pro/fat and CHO trials resulted in significantly greater (P &lt; 0. 05) plasma insulin and glucose concentration compared with Pl. Muscle glycogen was significantly lower (P &lt; 0.05) for the Ex vs. Con leg immediately postexercise for all three conditions. The rate of glycogen resynthesis was significantly greater (P &lt; 0.05) for both CHO/Pro/fat and CHO (23.0 +/- 4.5 and 19.3 +/- 6.1 mmol . kg dry muscle-1 . h-1, respectively) vs. Pl (Ex = 2.8 +/- 2.3 and Con = 1.4 +/- 3.6 mmol . kg dry muscle-1 . h-1). These results demonstrated that a bout of resistance exercise resulted in a significant decrease in muscle glycogen and that consumption of an isoenergetic CHO or CHO/Pro/fat formula drink resulted in similar rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis after resistance exercise. This suggests that total energy content and CHO content are important in the resynthesis of muscle glycogen.

    Publication Types:
    Clinical Trial
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    PMID: 9480948 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    This just tells us about synthesis again not enhanced muscle glycogen storage. I admit, it is confusing!
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    Originally posted by Bobo


    This just tells us about synthesis again not enhanced muscle glycogen storage. I admit, it is confusing!
    Yeah no kidding. So is the end goal glycogen resynthesis or enhanced glycogen storage?
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    Originally posted by Draven


    Yeah no kidding. So is the end goal glycogen resynthesis or enhanced glycogen storage?
    Well I think both would be ideal but there are many studies conflicting each other. Overrall if you have enhanced storage it could only be positive. I'm still trying to find studies on the checmical reaction that causes the combination of protein/carb to trigger a greater insulin release. This would be the nail in the coffin proving thats its just the carb itself no matter the GI combined with a protein that will cause a significant insulin spike. In theory, it should be the otherway around since yuor lowering the GI with the introduction of a protein in the mix.
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    Originally posted by Draven


    Yeah no kidding. So is the end goal glycogen resynthesis or enhanced glycogen storage?

    Good Job in finding those studies though. I see where your thinking is taking you and by no means are you wrong. What I'm saying not absolutely right, but from what I've read the conclusions can point in that direction and with using this in the real world I found it beneficial along with some others that have tried.
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    Bobo, you and JB use oatmeal right? How do you cook it? just water and rolled oats? No milk, right?
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    Originally posted by bachovas
    Bobo, you and JB use oatmeal right? How do you cook it? just water and rolled oats? No milk, right?
    Uncooked rolled oats. I grind them up with a coffee grinder into a powder for my shakes. No milk.
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    Originally posted by bachovas
    Bobo, you and JB use oatmeal right? How do you cook it? just water and rolled oats? No milk, right?
    I don't believe raw oats are anywhere near as good for you, no matter how fine you grind them. Thus I cook up about a week's worth of old fashioned rolled oats and put 1 1/2 cup each in 6-7 tupperware bowls, cover with Saran wrap and refrigerate. I just dump one of these into a blender with 20 oz water and 50 gmns protein for my shake.

    P.S. Look up all the studies you want Draven. If you try this for a month you will never look back
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    Originally posted by John Benz

    I don't believe raw oats are anywhere near as good for you, no matter how fine you grind them...
    Wow, wait, you mean post-workout, right?
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    Originally posted by John Benz

    I don't believe raw oats are anywhere near as good for you, no matter how fine you grind them.
    ive been basically chewing the "grinded not too fine" oatmeal in my shake. JB, raw oats vs cooke oatmeal...is it a simply a question of digestion and and absorption or is it a fact (reseach shown) that prepared oatmeal keeps and has more nutrients than the straigh raw? Sage
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    Originally posted by John Benz

    P.S. Look up all the studies you want Draven. If you try this for a month you will never look back
    Hehe, well I still may. I just want to understand all the facts, you know? I hate to do things just cause someone else says to. No offence, I don't think you guys are misleading or anything, just curious of the science behind it. As Bobo said there's alot of conflicting data out there.
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    I didn't read the whole thread, but I just wanted to add this;

    High-GI carbs might be definitely better at restoring glycogen stores quickly. No doubt about that.

    One of the main points of eating low-GI post-WO is a long-term issue. Imagine how efficient your body would become at processing carbs and using them as an immediate source of energy if your main source of carbs were slow digesting and low GI. (talking about the whole insulin sensitivity issue)

    Apart from theory, that's what I have been doing for about 9 months. In the last 3-4, I have gained about 20+lbs of weight, and my abs are still popping out. On top of that, I have never felt as good and energetic. (never used PHs, AAS, pro-steroids etc. either)

    The human body works much more optimally when fed with wholesome, clean, unprocessed foods.

    Also, unless you're on a keto diet, your liver &amp; muscles would hardly get completely depleted of glycogen, so no big worries there.
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    Originally posted by RippedUp

    One of the main points of eating low-GI post-WO is a long-term issue. Imagine how efficient your body would become at processing carbs and using them as an immediate source of energy if your main source of carbs were slow digesting and low GI. (talking about the whole insulin sensitivity issue)
    It's funny you mention this, I was pondering this exact thought last night. It would make sense that a low GI diet would increase insulin sensitivity like a zero carb diet does when on a keto.

    Good point. Is there any data out there to support this? I mean insulin sensitivity from a low GI diet. It makes sense.
    Last edited by Draven; 03-09-2003 at 10:58 PM.
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    I certainly believe at this point that both methods (high GI post workout vs low GI all day) will work, but there are good points about long term considerance here...is there enough of a difference in the long run to prefer one over the other if they are both effective?
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    Originally posted by RippedUp
    ...The human body works much more optimally when fed with wholesome, clean, unprocessed foods...
    Are you having cooked oatmeal too? What other source of low GI carbs could we use?
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    My only sources of carbs that I eat all year long come from;

    - oatmeal
    - very little Shredded Wheat (a few squares sprinkled on my post-WO oatmeal and second meal)
    - lactose (from milk - very little when cutting)
    - vegetables

    Post-WO, I've been eating,

    - 30g+ of protein from chicken/turkey
    - 20g+ from a good blend
    - cooked oatmeal (quantity depends on my goals)

    That's it.
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    Originally posted by RippedUp
    My only sources of carbs that I eat all year long come from;

    - oatmeal
    - very little Shredded Wheat (a few squares sprinkled on my post-WO oatmeal and second meal)
    - lactose (from milk - very little when cutting)
    - vegetables

    Post-WO, I've been eating,

    - 30g+ of protein from chicken/turkey
    - 20g+ from a good blend
    - cooked oatmeal (quantity depends on my goals)

    That's it.
    so you dont believe in a dextrose/malto post workout or fruits? just curious.
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    Just to clarify


    Originally posted by RippedUp
    My only sources of carbs that I eat all year long come from;

    - oatmeal
    - very little Shredded Wheat (a few squares sprinkled on my post-WO oatmeal and second meal)
    - lactose (from milk - very little when cutting)
    - vegetables

    Post-WO, I've been eating,

    - 30g+ of protein from chicken/turkey
    - 20g+ from a good blend
    - cooked oatmeal (quantity depends on my goals)

    That's it.

    RippedUp - Do you eat all of the above Post-WO foods immediately following training, or in two separate sittings?
    You guys have got me thinking about making some changes.
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    Nelson,

    I eat:

    - 30g+ of protein from chicken/turkey
    - 20g+ from a good blend
    - cooked oatmeal (quantity depends on my goals)

    immediately after I get home from the gym.

    Then the same meal 2 hours later.
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    Thanks RippedUp


    Cheers bro.
    I`m cutting now.
    Post w/o is 35g protein + 50g dextrose.
    Followed by salad & salmon an hour later.

    I would like to try out the low-gi carbs.
    Would I just change the 50g dextrose to 50g of carbs in the form of oatmeal?
    I feel stupid asking this, but would I still add creatine to the post-w/o whey/oatmeal mix?
    Thanks for your help in advance
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    Yes, no problem with that. Oatmeal is about 66% carbs.
    Add the creatine to the shake, or drink it with water. It doesn't matter.

    Stay well hydrated all the time. Strive for 3+ litres of water during the 2 hours bracketting your workout.
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