im addicted to orange roughy

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    im addicted to orange roughy


    ive never been a huge fish eater...mostly just chicken and beef but i must say orange roughy has totally changed my diet. it doesnt smell or even taste like fish...put a little ms dash lemon pepper seasoning on a fillet and grill it up and its pure HEAVEN. sorry i just had to rant on how great i think this particular fish is. can anyone give me a link where i could get the nutritional content on it?

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    You think orange roughy is good, try the halibut. My family recently brought some back from there fishing trip to alaska, and man that stuff is like the filet mignon of the fish industry. But yes orange roughy is very good. MMMMMMM fish i think i am going to put some in the oven now. LOL
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    **** is expensive though, I would eat fish everyday if I could afford it.
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    if you want a cheap fish without the nastiness your talking about try cod.
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    I gotta try Orange ruffy and halibut...I hate fish except for tuna which I am not even quite fond of! I am Puerto Rican and cod fish is a staple in many latin homes and I hate it, also called Bacalo, or in some places they have bacaloitos.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaNiaK1027
    I gotta try Orange ruffy and halibut...I hate fish except for tuna which I am not even quite fond of! I am Puerto Rican and cod fish is a staple in many latin homes and I hate it, also called Bacalo, or in some places they have bacaloitos.
    telling you orange ruffy is the shiznit.
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    My roomate and I would grill up a mess of that on the foreman with just a dash of Old Bay. The texture is great and I love the little indiviual vacuum packs that the fillet's came with the brand we bought. It tastes best fresh. Leftover fish just quite doesn't cut it like chicken or beef imo, although I'll eat almost ANYTHING.
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    Roughly is probably my favorite fish, taste-wise. Not exactly a marvel in terms of O:3-content, but damn if that **** ain't tasty grilled up with a little lime/soy/garlic/olive oil marinade. Mmm...glorious.
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    Thanks for the link Beelz!!
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    You guys should try Tilapia, that's by far my favorite fish. I used to hate fish and tried Orange Ruffy and really liked it...and now I eat Tilapia a few days a week. Usually I'll cook in in a pan with a little blackened seasoning (and if i'm feeling like adding a little extra I'll cut up a little mango and put some fresh salsa on it). YUM!
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    could someone enlighten me on how to cook fish in a pan? Actually the only way I've cooked it before was in the oven, which wasn't that good.
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    I like tilapia also. Grouper is about my favorite for grilling though. But Grouper here in Ohio is about 8-9 bucks a pound while Tilapia is 4-5 bucks a pound. Both are great though. Fresh caught walleye is the king though!
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    Quote Originally Posted by w00kie
    could someone enlighten me on how to cook fish in a pan? Actually the only way I've cooked it before was in the oven, which wasn't that good.
    It's so easy to cook fish in a pan. Just use a little oil (I like to use "I Can't Believe It's not Butter" spray) let the skillit get hot and then turn the heat down to med-hi. The trick to cooking fish in a skillit is to not turn it more than once or twice or it will flake up an not have as nice of a presentation...so just cook it on each side for about 2-3 minutes. You'll know it' done when you can take a fork to it and flake the meat.
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkfinger
    I like tilapia also. Grouper is about my favorite for grilling though. But Grouper here in Ohio is about 8-9 bucks a pound while Tilapia is 4-5 bucks a pound. Both are great though. Fresh caught walleye is the king though!
    I don't know if it has something to do with me being in Texas, but I get my Tilapia frozen...usually I get 10, 4 oz fillets for $5.99 at Albertsons grocery store. Sometimes I'll buy it frozen at other stores but i've never paid more than $7 for 10 fillets.
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    flounder is another good one
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    Quote Originally Posted by w00kie
    could someone enlighten me on how to cook fish in a pan? Actually the only way I've cooked it before was in the oven, which wasn't that good.
    Your better off cooking it in the oven. Even better would be any moist-heat cooking method. Fish cooks extremely fast and many people over cook it. Here is an excerpt from my cooking textbook I still have from when I went to school for it. I'm bored and maybe this will help. It also depends on if its a Fat fish or a lean fish.


    "Special Problems In Cooking Fish


    Doneness and "Flaking"


    When fish is cooked, the flesh breaks apart into its natural separations. This is callled "flaking." Most books, somewhat misleadingly, say that fish is done when it flakes easily. Unfortunately, some cooks interpret this as meaning "nearly falling apart." Because fish continues to cook in its retained heat even when removed from the fire, it is often dreadfully overcooked by the time it reaches the customer. Fish is very delicate and is easily overcooked.

    Observe these tests for doneness:

    1. The fish just separates into flakes; that is, it is beginning to flake but does not yet fall apart easily.

    2. If bone is present, the flesh separates from the bone, and the bone is no longer pink.

    3. The flesh has turned from translucent to opaque
    (usually white, depending on the kind of fish)


    Cooking Fat Fish and Lean Fish

    The fat content of fish ranges from 0.5 to 20%

    Lean fish are those that are low in fat. Examples: Flounder, sole, cod, red snapper, bass, perch,halibut, pike.

    Fat fish are those which are high in fat. Examples: Salmon, tuna, trout, butterfish, mackerel.

    Cooking Lean Fish

    Since lean fish had almost no fat, it can easily become very dry, especially if overcooked. It is often served with sauces to enhance the moistness and give richness.

    Moist-heat methods. Lean fish is especially well suited to poaching. This method preserves moistness.

    Dry-heat methods. Lean fish, if it is broiled or baked, should be basted generously with butter or oil. Take special care not to overcook, or the fish will be dry.

    Dry-heat methods with fat. Lean fish may be fried of sauteed. The fish gains palatability from the added fat.

    Cooking Fat Fish

    The fat in these fish enables them to tolerate more heat without becoming dry.

    Moist-heat methods. Fat fish, like lean fish, can be cooked by moist heat. Poached salmon and trout are very popular.

    Dry-heat methods. Fat fish are well suited to broiling and baking. The dry heat helps eliminated some excessive oiliness.

    Dry-heat methods with fat. Large fat fish, like salmon, or stronger-flavored fish, like bluefish or mackerel, are rarely cooked in fat. Smaller ones, like trout, are often pan-fried. Take care to avoid excessive greasiness. Drain the fish well before serving.


    Ok heres an answer to your other question about pan frying.

    Guidelines for Sauteing and Pan-Frying Fish and Shellfish

    1. Lean Fish are especially well suited to sauteing, because the cooking method supplies fat that the fish lack. Fat fish may also be sauteed, as long as you take care not to get the fish too greasy.

    2. Sauteed fish is usually given a coating of flour, breading, or other starchy product before sauteing. This forms a crust that browns attractively, enhances the flavor, and helps hold the fish together and prevent sticking.

    3. Fish may be soaked in milk briefly before dredging in flour. The helps the flour form a better crust.

    4. Clarified butter or oil are the preferred fats for sauteing and pan-frying. Whole butter is likely to burn, unless the fish items are very small.

    5. Use a minimum of fat. About 1/8 inch(3mm), or enough to cover the bottom of the pan is enough.

    6. Small items, such as shrimp or scallops, are sauteed over high heat. Larger items, such as whole fish, require lower heat to cook evenly.

    7. Very large fish may be browned in fat, then finished in the oven, uncovered.

    8. Brown the most attractive side-the presentation side-first. For fillets, this is the flesh side or the side against the bone, not the skin side.

    9. Handle fish carefully during and after cooking to avoid breaking the fish or the crisp crust.

    10. Saute or fry to order and serve immediately."

    Uh, end quote!. Ok I put quotes around all of it and its just an excerpt so it should be ok.
  

  
 

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