View Poll Results: how many eggs do you eat a day?

Voters
44. This poll is closed
  • two dozen or more

    0 0%
  • 12 or more

    6 13.64%
  • 6-12

    22 50.00%
  • 1-6

    16 36.36%

how many eggs per day.

Page 2 of 2 First 12

  1. Quote Originally Posted by Iron Warrior
    Well I used Lana's egg whites, not actual eggs. I just count the grams of protein. It's just too convenient that way and I hate cooking.
    LOL...lazy ass! You need to get ya a good woman!


  2. what are the macros for one egg minus the yolk?

    and don't they make your shakes kind of slimy?

  3. i slam mine, it is a little, i dont notice much
    •   
       


  4. Are eggs alright PW?

  5. i throw about 6-12 raw eggs down per day, generally blended up in some concoction of milk, oatmeal, peanut butter, protein powder, honey, etc. good shiznitz.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by Beelzebub
    i throw about 6-12 raw eggs down per day, generally blended up in some concoction of milk, oatmeal, peanut butter, protein powder, honey, etc. good shiznitz.
    I get four at breakfast, couple more in shake like Beelzebub.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by Bobo
    This has overblow somewhat but if you are concerned, switch to albacore. The problem is eliminated.

    I thought albacore was high in mercury and chunk light was lower in mercury?

    SeaHawk22

  8. Is there a better way to get the yoke out of the raw egg. Right now I use a spoon and I always break the dam thing.

  9. just crack it in half and dump the egg from shell to shell to get all the whites out

    Jumbo eggs are the best, alot more egg white for your $
    My Little Site about Hair Loss & Anabolics-
    hair loss from steroids dot com

  10. Isnt eating such ridiculous amounts of eggs a little harsh on the saturated fat? I mean...5 eggs a day is like 8 grams of sat fat and 25 grams of total fat!
    I love whole eggs. I could eat a dozen in one shot (frittata) noooo problem!.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Edge
    Isnt eating such ridiculous amounts of eggs a little harsh on the saturated fat? I mean...5 eggs a day is like 8 grams of sat fat and 25 grams of total fat!
    I love whole eggs. I could eat a dozen in one shot (frittata) noooo problem!.
    Yeah, stick to mostly egg whites. All the sat fat/cholesterol is in the yolk.

  12. Quote Originally Posted by TheUsual
    Yeah, stick to mostly egg whites. All the sat fat/cholesterol is in the yolk.
    So what about these guys that eat a dozen eggs a day lol. Doesnt it pose a health risk?

  13. I have a question for bobo or anyone else in the know. I read the other day that the risk associated with the fat and cholesterol in egg yolks is overblown, do you know the reality of this? I stick mainly to the whites to be on the safe side anyways, just wondering. Thanks.

  14. so what is the chance to get salmonella from eating row eggs?
    I eat them raw once in a while... people do this and tell me I'm gonna die. LOL


    Salmonella is carried on the outside of the egg, so as long as you wash the eggs before you eat them, in warm water with a little dish soap or just use fruit spray, you are fine.

  15. Anyone have a hard boiled egg peeler like this one?

    http://www.youcansave.com/eggstractor.asp

    Hard boiled eggs can be very convenient, but I frickin hate peeling them.


    Also, if you like your yolks but worry about the fat, they have Omega-3 eggs now that are supposed to contain mostly good fats(a little more expensive though). I think they are from chickens that eat flax seed.

  16. Quote Originally Posted by Moyer
    Anyone have a hard boiled egg peeler like this one?

    http://www.youcansave.com/eggstractor.asp

    Hard boiled eggs can be very convenient, but I frickin hate peeling them.


    Also, if you like your yolks but worry about the fat, they have Omega-3 eggs now that are supposed to contain mostly good fats(a little more expensive though). I think they are from chickens that eat flax seed.
    My friend has that egg contraption. He says its not worth the effort, that website makes it look like you bang one out after another though you have to open it each time and place it just right in there, and that he smashes alot of them making it even hard to get the shell off the egg.

    I was reading somewhere (sorry no link) that the omega 3 eggs only have a bit more omega 3 and that for the extra money you're better off using more flax/fish.

  17. if the hospital didn't call you, it doesn't mean a damn thing one way or another.

    i had also heard/read/pulled out of thin air that the chunk light tuna has less mercury than the albacore because of the relative ages of the fish, i.e. chunck light is younger, less concentration of mercury...

  18. Quote Originally Posted by Beta BBer
    if the hospital didn't call you, it doesn't mean a damn thing one way or another.

    i had also heard/read/pulled out of thin air that the chunk light tuna has less mercury than the albacore because of the relative ages of the fish, i.e. chunck light is younger, less concentration of mercury...
    if you reply to a post put a quote or address who you are speaking, It is annoying to have to reread the whole thread to keep up. thx

    did you guys here about how hillary swank put on 19 lbs of muscle in 3 months??????
    her trainer had her kill like 30 egg whites a day,
    shee looked freaky for that role, a female boxer. quite a transformation.

  19. Quote Originally Posted by DmitryWI
    so what is the chance to get salmonella from eating row eggs?

    I eat them raw once in a while... people do this and tell me I'm gonna die. LOL
    Eat ORGANIC free range raw eggs, they have a lot less % of salmonella and the nutrient levels are supposed to be better. But they cost more.

  20. I pay a little extra for organic veg fed hens. The brand i use contain only 1gram of saturated fat per egg (versus 2.5g for regular large eggs). Also contains a good trace of omega fats. I dont like bothering throwing out the yolks so this allows me to save a bit.
    Sage

  21. http://unisci.com/stories/20014/1029013.htm


    Why Eggs Don't Contribute Much Cholesterol To Diet

    Nutrition researchers at Kansas State University have published the first evidence that the absorption of cholesterol is reduced by another compound in the egg, a lecithin.
    The research by Sung I. Koo, Yonghzhi Jiang and Sang K. Noh has resulted in the issue of U.S. Patent No. 6,248,728, "Compositions and methods for lowering intestinal absorption and plasma levels of cholesterol." The patent was issued June 19 to the KSU Foundation.

    A peer-reviewed research paper by the three researchers, "Egg phosphatidylcholine decreases the lymphatic absorption of cholesterol in rats," appears in the September issue of Journal of Nutrition.

    Many people believe that dietary cholesterol directly contributes to raising blood cholesterol. Because eggs provide about half the dietary cholesterol in a typical Western diet, the public has been advised to limit its egg consumption.

    Under the experimental conditions using an animal model that closely mimics human physiology, Koo and his associates found that a particular egg phospholipid interferes with the absorption of egg cholesterol and markedly lowers its uptake by the intestine. When the phospholipid is saturated, its inhibitory effect is further enhanced.

    The researchers controlled experimental conditions to specifically look at egg phospholipid and its effect on cholesterol absorption. Even though a good amount of cholesterol is consumed when an egg is eaten, much of the cholesterol becomes "unavailable for absorption" in the presence of the phospholipid, Koo said.

    "This may be a reason why so many studies found no association between egg intake and blood cholesterol," he said. The phospholipid, or lecithin, found in egg markedly inhibits the cholesterol absorption. The inhibition is not 100 percent, he said. Some cholesterol is absorbed but the amount is significantly reduced in the presence of this phospholipid.

    "Less absorption means less cholesterol introduced into the blood," Koo said. "We were able to determine experimentally that a substantial amount of the egg cholesterol is not going into the blood stream."

    Koo says people with normal cholesterol levels and no family history of cardiovascular disease should not worry about eating one to two eggs a day. There's more overall nutritional benefit than harm to be gained from eating "nutrient-dense" eggs -- in moderation, he said.

    Egg contains a higher quality protein than protein found in meat, milk or fish.

    Furthermore, egg is a significant source of vitamins A and E, and B vitamins B-6, B-12 and folate, which are known to lower blood levels of homocysteine, an independent risk factor for heart disease.

    Koo's research has received support from the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA National Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program.

    Koo is a professor of human nutrition at K-State; Jiang received a master's degree in nutrition from K-State; and Noh is a postdoctoral researcher at K-State who is continuing research with Koo. - By Kay Garrett

  22. http://www.mercola.com/2002/aug/21/saturated_fat2.htm

    The Benefits Of Saturated Fats

    The much-maligned saturated fats-which Americans are trying to avoid-are not the cause of our modern diseases. In fact, they play many important roles in the body chemistry:

    Saturated fatty acids constitute at least 50% of the cell membranes. They are what gives our cells necessary stiffness and integrity.
    They play a vital role in the health of our bones. For calcium to be effectively incorporated into the skeletal structure, at least 50% of the dietary fats should be saturated.38
    They lower Lp(a), a substance in the blood that indicates proneness to heart disease.39 They protect the liver from alcohol and other toxins, such as Tylenol.40
    They enhance the immune system.41
    They are needed for the proper utilization of essential fatty acids. Elongated omega-3 fatty acids aņe better retained in the tissues when the diet is rich in saturated fats. 42
    Saturated 18-carbon stearic acid`and 16-carbon palmitic acid are the preferred foods for the heart, which is why the fat around the heart muscle is highly saturated.43 The heart draws on this reserve of fat in times of stress.
    Short- and medium-chain saturated fatty acids have important antimicrobial properties. They protect us against harmful microorganisms in the digestive tract.

  23. I heard albacore tuna is the one with higher mercury content and was advised to stick with the cheap **** (as it carries less mercury content). Could be wrong

  24. Quote Originally Posted by sage
    I pay a little extra for organic veg fed hens. The brand i use contain only 1gram of saturated fat per egg (versus 2.5g for regular large eggs). Also contains a good trace of omega fats. I dont like bothering throwing out the yolks so this allows me to save a bit.
    Sage
    Same here bro. I eat Egglands Best. 100mg Omega 3 per serving, 40% more Vitamin E, and lower saturated fat.

  25. Heres the part these articles leave out. Heat oxidizes the cholesterol in food. Thereby it places oxidized cholesterol in to the blood stream. However I am not knocking the article. There is a way around this. It is all about how you cook your eggs. The best methods to avoid oxidizing the cholesterol in eggs is to cook them either hard boiled, over easy, or poached. Frying the yolk will oxidize the cholesterol and it will have the same effect as free floating oxidized LDL.

    I could get in to how LDL isn't all bad (it transports beta-carotene for starters) but that might deserve it's own thread.




    Quote Originally Posted by CROWLER
    http://unisci.com/stories/20014/1029013.htm


    Why Eggs Don't Contribute Much Cholesterol To Diet

    Nutrition researchers at Kansas State University have published the first evidence that the absorption of cholesterol is reduced by another compound in the egg, a lecithin.
    The research by Sung I. Koo, Yonghzhi Jiang and Sang K. Noh has resulted in the issue of U.S. Patent No. 6,248,728, "Compositions and methods for lowering intestinal absorption and plasma levels of cholesterol." The patent was issued June 19 to the KSU Foundation.

    A peer-reviewed research paper by the three researchers, "Egg phosphatidylcholine decreases the lymphatic absorption of cholesterol in rats," appears in the September issue of Journal of Nutrition.

    Many people believe that dietary cholesterol directly contributes to raising blood cholesterol. Because eggs provide about half the dietary cholesterol in a typical Western diet, the public has been advised to limit its egg consumption.

    Under the experimental conditions using an animal model that closely mimics human physiology, Koo and his associates found that a particular egg phospholipid interferes with the absorption of egg cholesterol and markedly lowers its uptake by the intestine. When the phospholipid is saturated, its inhibitory effect is further enhanced.

    The researchers controlled experimental conditions to specifically look at egg phospholipid and its effect on cholesterol absorption. Even though a good amount of cholesterol is consumed when an egg is eaten, much of the cholesterol becomes "unavailable for absorption" in the presence of the phospholipid, Koo said.

    "This may be a reason why so many studies found no association between egg intake and blood cholesterol," he said. The phospholipid, or lecithin, found in egg markedly inhibits the cholesterol absorption. The inhibition is not 100 percent, he said. Some cholesterol is absorbed but the amount is significantly reduced in the presence of this phospholipid.

    "Less absorption means less cholesterol introduced into the blood," Koo said. "We were able to determine experimentally that a substantial amount of the egg cholesterol is not going into the blood stream."

    Koo says people with normal cholesterol levels and no family history of cardiovascular disease should not worry about eating one to two eggs a day. There's more overall nutritional benefit than harm to be gained from eating "nutrient-dense" eggs -- in moderation, he said.

    Egg contains a higher quality protein than protein found in meat, milk or fish.

    Furthermore, egg is a significant source of vitamins A and E, and B vitamins B-6, B-12 and folate, which are known to lower blood levels of homocysteine, an independent risk factor for heart disease.

    Koo's research has received support from the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA National Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program.

    Koo is a professor of human nutrition at K-State; Jiang received a master's degree in nutrition from K-State; and Noh is a postdoctoral researcher at K-State who is continuing research with Koo. - By Kay Garrett

  26. Quote Originally Posted by DmitryWI
    so what is the chance to get salmonella from eating row eggs?

    I eat them raw once in a while... people do this and tell me I'm gonna die. LOL
    I read somewhere it was 1 in 1000
  

  
 

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