Great quotes from a book based on the GI.

  1. Doctor Science
    LakeMountD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    4,251
    Rep Power
    2557
    Level
    46
    Lv. Percent
    93.03%
    Achievements Activity ProPosting Pro

    Great quotes from a book based on the GI.


    Thought you guys might enjoy these. Thankfully I type pretty fast so I typed up some of the more interesting sections. Check it out.

    Quotes from “The New Glucose Revolution"

    The Effect of Fiber on the Glycemic Index
    The effect of fiber on the GI value of a food depends on the type o fiber and its viscosity. Finely ground wheat fiber, such as in whole wheat bread, has no effect whatsoever on the rate of starch digestion and subsequent blood-glucose response. Similarly, any product made with whole-wheat flour will have a GI value of similar to that of its white counterpart. Breakfast cereals made with whole heat flours will also tend to have high GI values, unless there are other confounding factors. Puffed Wheat (GI value of 80), which is made from well-cooked whole-wheat grains, ahs a high GI value, despite its high fiber content. If the fiber is still intact it can act as a physical barrier to digestion, and then the GI value will be lower. This is one of the reasons why All-Bran has a low GI value. It is also one of the reasons why whole intact grains usually have low GI values. Viscous fiber thickens the mixture of food entering the digestive tract. This slows the passage of food and restricts the movement of enzymes, thereby slowing digestion. The end result is a lower blood glucose response. Legumes contain high levels of viscous fiber, as do oats and psyllium.

    The Effect of Acid on the Glycemic Index
    Within the last few years, several reports in the scientific literature have indicated that a realistic amount of vinegar or lemon juice in the form of a salad dressing consumed with a mixed meal has a significant blood glucose lowering effects. As little as 4 teaspoons of vinegar (with 2 teaspoons of oil) in a vinaigrette dressing taken with an average meal lowered blood glucose by as much as 30 percent. These findings have important implications for people with diabetes or individuals at risk of diabetes, coronary heart disease, or the metabolic syndrome….Sourdough breads, in which lactic acid and propionic acid are produced by the natural fermentation of starch and sugars by the years starter culture, also can reduce levels of blood glucose and insulin by 22 percent compared to normal bread.

    The Effect of Sugar on the Glycemic Index
    Table sugar or refined sugar (sucrose) has a GI value of only 60-65. This is because it is a disaccharide composed of one glucose molecule coupled to one fructose molecule. Fructose is absorbed and taken directly to the liver where it is immediately oxidized (burned for energy). The blood glucose response to the pure fructose is very small (GI value of 19). Consequently, when we consume sucrose, only half of what we’ve eaten is actually glucose; the other half is fructose. This explains why the blood-glucose response to 50 grams of sucrose is approximately half that of 50 grams of corn syrup or maltodextrins.

    What is the effect of extra protein and fat on the glycemic index and blood-glucose response?
    Eaten alone, protein and fat have little effect on blood-glucose levels. So a steak or a piece of cheese won’t produce a rise in blood glucose. It’s the carbohydrates in foods that are primarily responsible for the rise and fall in glucose after meals. Adding fat and protein to a meal doesn’t affect the nature of the carbohydrate and thus does not affect its GI value. But that’s not to say that protein and fat won’t affect the blood-glucose response when eaten together with carbohydrate. Both tend to cause a delay in stomach emptying, thereby slowing the rate at which carbohydrate can be digested and absorbed. So a high-fat meal will have a lower glycemic effect than a low-fat meal, even if they both contain the same amount and type of carbohydrate. However, you can still count on the fact that a high-GI carbohydrate food will produce a higher response than a low GI food, even if there’s extra fat and protein added to the meal.

    I’ve read that dairy products cause an increase in insulin secretion. Their GI value is around 30-50 but their insulin index is three times higher.
    Scientists don’t know the reason why dairy products do this. Our guess is that milk proteins are “insulinogenic? because they are meant to stimulate the growth of young mammals. Insulin is an anabolic hormone designed to drive nutrients into cells—not just glucose but also fatty acids and amino acids, the building blocks of new tissue. Milk may contain a unique combination of amino acids that together are more insulin stimulating than any alone. This disparity between glucose and insulin response is not unique to dairy products. We’ve found that certain sweets and baked products also do this. Chocolate may also contain insulinogenic amino acids.

    A Recent Study
    …One recent study from the Netherlands gave support to a moderate increase in protein (from 15 to 25 percent) and a moderate decrease in carbohydrate (from 55 to 45 percent). Fat intake was the same in both the control group and the high protein group—30 percent of energy. Volunteers in the study were permitted to eat as much food as they wished but all were trying to lose weight. At the end of the twelve-week study, both weight loss and body-fat loss were greater on the high protein diet. The investigators suggested that the higher protein intake had increased the metabolic rate and also increased satiety. It is well known that protein stimulates more thermogenesis (heat production) than any other nutrient and is also the most satiating nutrient. There was no advice about the glycemic index on either diet.

  2. The Godfather of NUTRAPLANET
    stryder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Age
    37
    Posts
    3,980
    Rep Power
    26690
    Level
    45
    Lv. Percent
    14.78%
    Achievements Activity ProPosting Pro

    Nice post! Was looking for information like this. Did you get this from the book or from a website?
  3. Doctor Science
    LakeMountD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    4,251
    Rep Power
    2557
    Level
    46
    Lv. Percent
    93.03%
    Achievements Activity ProPosting Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by stryder
    Nice post! Was looking for information like this. Did you get this from the book or from a website?
    My own scientific research of course! Okay okay not really, it is from the book "The new glycemic revolution". Outstanding book, however, you have to buy the new revised edition.
    •   
       

  4. New Member
    xil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Age
    28
    Posts
    45
    Rep Power
    149
    Level
    6
    Lv. Percent
    40.67%

    Quote Originally Posted by LakeMountD
    Th
    I’ve read that dairy products cause an increase in insulin secretion. Their GI value is around 30-50 but their insulin index is three times higher.
    Scientists don’t know the reason why dairy products do this. Our guess is that milk proteins are “insulinogenic? because they are meant to stimulate the growth of young mammals. Insulin is an anabolic hormone designed to drive nutrients into cells—not just glucose but also fatty acids and amino acids, the building blocks of new tissue. Milk may contain a unique combination of amino acids that together are more insulin stimulating than any alone. This disparity between glucose and insulin response is not unique to dairy products. We’ve found that certain sweets and baked products also do this. Chocolate may also contain insulinogenic amino acids.
    I asked bobo this when I started his program, and he said that skim milk is not highly insulinogenic, however whole milk is. I just looked through pubmed (quite new at it though...) and found studies showing the II of milk was comparable to that of white bread... but none mention what type of milk was used.

    Bjorck I, Liljeberg H, Ostman E.

    Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Sweden. Inger.bjorck@inl.lth.se

    Accumulating data indicate that a diet characterized by low glycaemic-index (GI) foods not only improves certain metabolic ramifications of insulin resistance, but also reduces insulin resistance per se. Epidemiological data also suggest a protective role against development of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. A major disadvantage in this connection is the shortage of low-GI foods, and many common starchy staple foods, such as bread products, breakfast cereals and potato products, have a high GI. Studies in our laboratory show that it is possible to significantly lower the GI of starchy foods, for example by choice of raw material and/or by optimizing the processing conditions. Such low-GI foods may or may not influence glucose tolerance at a subsequent meal. Consequently, certain low-GI breakfasts capable of maintaining a net increment in blood glucose and insulin at the time of the next meal significantly reduced post-prandial glycaemia and insulinaemia following a standardized lunch meal, whereas others had no 'second-meal' impact. These results imply that certain low-GI foods may be more efficient in modulating metabolism in the long term. Although the literature supports a linear correlation between the GI and insulinaemic index (II) of foods, this is not always the case. Consequently, milk products elicited elevated IIs, indistinguishable from a white bread reference meal, despite GIs in the lower range. This inconsistent behaviour of milk products has not been acknowledged, and potential metabolic consequences remain to be elucidated


    Inconsistency between glycemic and insulinemic responses to regular and fermented milk products.

    Ostman EM, Liljeberg Elmstahl HG, Bjorck IM.

    Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Center for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Sweden. elin.ostman@inl.lth.se

    BACKGROUND: Foods with a low glycemic index are increasingly being acknowledged as beneficial in relation to the insulin resistance syndrome. Certain organic acids can lower the glycemic index of bread products. However, the possible effect of acids in fermented milk products on the glycemic index and on insulinemic characteristics has not been addressed. The metabolic effects of fermented milk or pickled products used as additives to mixed meals have also not been addressed. OBJECTIVES: One objective was to characterize the glycemic and insulinemic responses after intake of regular or fermented milk products (study 1). In addition, the acute metabolic effect of fermented milk (yogurt) and pickled cucumber as supplements to a traditional breakfast based on a high-glycemic index bread was evaluated (study 2). DESIGN: Ten healthy volunteers were served different breakfast meals after an overnight fast. Capillary blood samples were collected before and during 2 (study 1) or 3 (study 2) h after the meal. White-wheat bread was used as a reference meal in both studies. RESULTS: The lactic acid in the fermented milk products did not lower the glycemic and insulinemic indexes. Despite low glycemic indexes of 15-30, all of the milk products produced high insulinemic indexes of 90-98, which were not significantly different from the insulinemic index of the reference bread. Addition of fermented milk (yogurt) and pickled cucumber to a breakfast with a high-glycemic index bread significantly lowered postprandial glycemia and insulinemia compared with the reference meal. In contrast, addition of regular milk and fresh cucumber had no favorable effect on the metabolic respnnses. CONCLUSIONS: Milk products appear insulinotropic as judged from 3-fold to 6-fold higher insulinemic indexes than expected from the corresponding glycemic indexes. The presence of organic acids may counteract the insulinotropic effect of milk in mixed meals.

    Can you help explain a little please bobo? What would make whole milk highly insulinogenic and skim not? Is it the fat and impurities?
  5. Doctor Science
    LakeMountD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    4,251
    Rep Power
    2557
    Level
    46
    Lv. Percent
    93.03%
    Achievements Activity ProPosting Pro

    well i couldnt tell ya lol, i am just copying it out of the book, i just thought all of this was interesting and worth me typing it for everyone to see.
  6. Senior Member
    Jstrong20's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,385
    Rep Power
    215267
    Level
    33
    Lv. Percent
    58.44%
    Achievements Activity ProPosting Pro

    Well if regular milk causes a high insulin response than it would seem that would be ideal to mix with your post workout shake. I know alot of people believe the opposite to be true which is the fat in milk will slow absorption and decrease the GI. I know I love hole milk and would love to have a good excuse to start drinkng it again.lol
  

  
 

Similar Forum Threads

  1. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 05-02-2005, 07:13 AM
  2. Funny quotes from the 2004 Olympics
    By Rock Lee in forum General Chat
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-08-2004, 01:24 PM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-22-2004, 11:01 PM
  4. where on the plunger do i measure from?
    By djhex36 in forum Anabolics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-12-2003, 06:46 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Log in
Log in