Low Calorie Dieting Increases Cortisol.

  1. Low Calorie Dieting Increases Cortisol.


    Enjoy


    Psychosom Med. 2010 Apr 5. [Epub ahead of print]

    Low Calorie Dieting Increases Cortisol.
    Tomiyama AJ, Mann T, Vinas D, Hunger JM, Dejager J, Taylor SE.

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholars Program (A.J.T.), University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Department of Psychology (T.M., J.M.H.), University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota; and the Department of Psychology (D.V., S.E.T.) and Student Development Health Education (J.D.), University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

    Abstract
    Objective: To test the hypothesis that dieting, or the restriction of caloric intake, is ineffective because it increases chronic psychological stress and cortisol production-two factors that are known to cause weight gain; and to examine the respective roles of the two main behaviors that comprise dieting-monitoring one's caloric intake and restricting one's caloric intake-on psychological and biological stress indicators. Methods: In a 2 (monitoring vs. not) x 2 (restricting vs. not) fully crossed, controlled experiment, 121 female participants were assigned randomly to one of four dietary interventions for 3 weeks. The monitoring + restricting condition tracked their caloric intake and restricted their caloric intake (1200 kcal/day); the monitoring only condition tracked their caloric intake but ate normally; the restricting only condition was provided 1200 kcal/day of food but did not track their calories, and the control group ate normally and did not track their intake. Before and after the interventions, participants completed measures of perceived stress and 2 days of diurnal saliva sampling to test for cortisol. Results: Restricting calories increased the total output of cortisol, and monitoring calories increased perceived stress. Conclusions: Dieting may be deleterious to psychological well-being and biological functioning, and changes in clinical recommendations may be in order.


  2. did they say what percent of you calories had to be reduced in order to show an increase in cortisol?

    more then 10% , less then 10%?

    looks like i will have to look it up.

    However 1200 calories is pretty low,

    even for a woman 130 pounds.

  3. Of course dieting increases cortisol because cortisol helps to mobilize FFAs for a source of glucose.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys

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  4. I think the big picture here is how much increase because cortisol stores fat. And where it stores it is the last place to go. So seeing how much of a caloric intake decrease it takes to cause this is important for all dieters. Not just do to where storage is, but possibly the increase in alpha receptors as well making it harder to lose it

    You don't necessarily have to decrease calories more then 100 cals per day to cause a loss

    If we are looking at big increases that's not good

  5. Use a cortisol control supplement...

  6. Quote Originally Posted by crazyfool405 View Post
    I think the big picture here is how much increase because cortisol stores fat. And where it stores it is the last place to go. So seeing how much of a caloric intake decrease it takes to cause this is important for all dieters. Not just do to where storage is, but possibly the increase in alpha receptors as well making it harder to lose it

    You don't necessarily have to decrease calories more then 100 cals per day to cause a loss

    If we are looking at big increases that's not good
    I think that you are confusing two different situations.

    (1)Fat gain from increased cortisol due to stress in the presence of surplus calories
    (2)Increased cortisol due to hypocaloric diet

    These are not really related.

    A below maintenance level caloric intake is a prerequisite for weight loss. A natural consequence of this is increased cortisol. As Rodja said, this is for mobilizing energy from stores. This is just a fact of dieting and human metabolism and is why some strength and muscle loss during cutting is not unusual. Mitigate through a reasonable calorie deficit, adequate rest, diet, and stress management. Nothing else to see here.
  

  
 

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