Need a good carb to throw into the blender with my "DAILY MEAL" - AnabolicMinds.com

Need a good carb to throw into the blender with my "DAILY MEAL"

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    Need a good carb to throw into the blender with my "DAILY MEAL"


    Every day I mix about 150g of optimum whey with 1 can of natural peanut butter and drink it throughout the day to help me get my protein/fats/carbs. I have been losing weight lately and feeling flat, what is a good slow release carb I can put in there to help up the carbs/cals and help keep my glycogen levels up without going straight to fat?
    I thought about oatmeal but that would end up like wallpaper paste, what about dextrose? Any input appreciated.
    BTW I do not have time to sit down and eat 6 quality meals, I eat from my blender basically. I know this sucks but my lifestyle is VERY hectic if you were me you would understand. BTW I weigh 255-260 and am trying to gain some more weight.

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    well to be honest, I would not recommend adding carbs and fats together, so if you are using P. butter in your shakes I wouldn't add carbs, either make your shakes with pro/fat or pro/carbs
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    I found this study that makes a promising case for honey:
    Honey is a supersaturated sugar solution that is made up primarily of the simple sugars fructose and glucose and water, 38, 31, and 17 percent, respectively. Disaccharides and oligosaccharides are present also but in much smaller quantities. Honey also contains a small amount of protein/amino acids (proline, lysine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamic and aspartic acids), vitamins (riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B-6, folate, vitamin C) and minerals (calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, iron, zinc, magnesium, selenium, copper, manganese)3. In addition, honey is known to be rich in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, including catalase, ascorbic acid, flavonoids and alkaloids.4, 5

    Honey and Athletic Performance

    It is well known that carbohydrate ingestion prior to, during and after exercise affects an athlete's performance and recovery. Research on the effects of fructose and glucose feedings demonstrated that neither was ideal when used alone. Fructose is poorly absorbed and can cause GI distress but has a low insulin response and spares muscle glycogen. Glucose, however, is well absorbed and quickly metabolized but has a high insulin response that stimulates glycogen storage instead of mobilization, which is important for endurance athletes who need a more constant supply of glucose. Studies have shown that a mixture of carbohydrates is better tolerated and better suited for fatigue prevention and enhanced performance.6

    There has been a multi-phase research study conducted at the University of Memphis under the supervision of Dr. Richard Kreider, prior to his departure to Baylor University, that documents some of the benefits of honey in sport.

    In the first phase7 of the study, honey was evaluated regarding its efficacy as a pre-workout energy source. Blood glucose, insulin concentration, glycemic index and the insulin response index were determined in seventy-one subjects. After an eight-hour fast, the subjects were given one of seven gel packets. The packets contained either dextrose, sucrose, fructose, maltodextrin, honey, PowerGel (a commercially available gel product), or similarly flavored placebo. At the conclusion of the study, the investigators found that dextrose, sucrose, maltodextrin, honey and PowerGel significantly increased blood glucose levels following ingestion although honey had the lowest glycemic index response. When ranked in order from lowest to highest, the glycemic index of each gel was:

    Fructose 5
    Honey 35
    PowerGel 43
    Sucrose 71
    Dextrose 100
    Maltodextrin 121

    Another finding from this first phase was that the insulin response (insulin response index or IRI) of honey was relatively low. Comparisons between the gel groups showed that maltodextrin has the highest, or fastest, IRI. When ranked from lowest to highest, the IRI for the gels were:

    Fructose 41
    Honey 59
    Dextrose 100
    PowerGel 113
    Sucrose 147
    Maltodextrin 158

    Overall, the results from this first phase demonstrated that honey provides a low glycemic response or slow release of sugar into the blood accompanied by a low insulin response. The investigators concluded that because high glycemic food ingested immediately prior to exercise may actually hasten the use of muscle glycogen, therefore, honey is a beneficial sugar prior to exercise.

    In the second phase8, nine competitive cyclists received one of three supplements in gel form per week, over a three-week period: honey, glucose, or a flavored, calorie-free placebo. The endurance test conducted each week was a 40-mile time trial on each subject's racing bicycle. The cyclists received 15 grams of carbohydrate in gel form along with 250 milliliters of water prior to and every 10 miles during the time trials.

    Both the glucose and the honey produced a statistically significant reduction in the time to finish (over 3 minutes), and a significant increase in the athlete's average power (6% increase), when compared to the placebo. The results from this second phase indicated that honey was an effective alternative carbohydrate source for endurance athletes and that honey was well tolerated by all of the subjects.

    The third phase9 studied the post-exercise recovery from strength training with the addition of honey as the predominant sugar in a whey protein powder drink. Thirty-nine weight-trained male and female athletes underwent an intensive weight workout and then immediately consumed a protein supplement blended with either sucrose, maltodextrin, or honey powder.

    The results from the third phase demonstrated that the honey group maintained optimal blood sugar levels throughout the two hours following the workout and that the subjects taking the honey supplement showed favorable changes in a hormone ratio that indicates a positive muscle recuperative state. The investigators concluded that the combination of honey powder and whey protein performed well by increasing blood glucose concentrations. Maltodextrin also performed well but did not yield as great an increase in blood glucose concentrations as the honey powder. The honey powder/whey protein supplement performed better than sucrose and was well tolerated as determined by self-reported symptoms of hypoglycemia, dizziness, headache, stomach upset and fatigue.

    Overall, this three phase preliminary study investigating the efficacy of honey use pre-, during and post-exercise is beneficial for future research studies to replicate but more importantly, it suggests that honey could be another option for endurance athletes, and possibly strength athletes, for improving athletic performance.

    References:

    1. Report on consumer uses and attitudes towards honey. 1997. Prepared for the National Honey Board. Associated Marketing, Chicago, IL.
    2. Jones, R. 2001. Honey and healing through the ages. In ''Honey and Healing," ed. P. Munn and R. Jones. International Bee Research Association, Cardiff, UK.
    3. USDA data obtained from Genesis® R&D Nutrition Analysis Program Version 7.01 from ESHA Research, Salem, Oregon.
    4. Crane, E. 1976. "Honey: A Comprehensive Survey," Corrected edition. International Bee Research Association/Heinemann, London.
    5. Berenbaum, M., Robinson, G. & Unnevehr, L. 1995-1996. Antioxidant properties of Illinois honeys. Grant Proposal for National Honey Board. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    6. Brouns, F. et al. 1989. Metabolic changes induced by sustained exhaustive cycling and diet manipulation. Int. J. Sports Med. 10: S49-S62.
    7. Kreider, R.B. et al. (2000). Effects of ingesting carbohydrate gels on glucose, insulin and perception of hypoglycemia. FASEB J. 14: A490.
    8. Lancaster, S. et al. (2001). Effects of honey supplementation on glucose, insulin and endurance cycling performance. FASEB J. 15: LB315.
    9. Kreider, R.B. et al. (2000). Effects of ingesting protein with various forms of carbohydrate following resistance-exercise on substrate availability and markers of catabolism. J. Strength. Cond. Res. 14:366.
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    The shake as it stands is 55%fat/37%protein/8%carb.
    No wonder I have been feeling flat, perhaps I should cut the peanut butter and add more protein. I had been using this to help trim up a bit but I just feel weak as hell on it and I do not like feeling, and looking flat. Any more recomendations welcome.
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    NutritionFacts
    1 tbs
    Amount per servingCalories68Calories from fat0% Daily Value *Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Sodium 0mg0%Total
    Carbohydrate 17g
    6%Dietary Fiber 0g0%Protein 0gPercent values are based on a 2,000 calorie per day diet. Your daily values may differ.Additional Information
    0% of calories from Fat
    100% from Carbohydrates
    0% from Protein

    This info is for powdered honey that was used in the study, would not take much to get some serious calories.
    http://www.bulkfoods.com/search_resu...rch=fromSearch

    25lbs for 75 dollars thats a lot of calories lol.
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    I would grind up some oats in a food processor.
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    I would grind up some oats in a food processor.
    True but that would have to be a huge amount of oats.
    3 cups of that powdered honey is 3,264 cals
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigmark1972
    Every day I mix about 150g of optimum whey with 1 can of natural peanut butter and drink it throughout the day to help me get my protein/fats/carbs. I have been losing weight lately and feeling flat, what is a good slow release carb I can put in there to help up the carbs/cals and help keep my glycogen levels up without going straight to fat?
    I thought about oatmeal but that would end up like wallpaper paste, what about dextrose? Any input appreciated.
    BTW I do not have time to sit down and eat 6 quality meals, I eat from my blender basically. I know this sucks but my lifestyle is VERY hectic if you were me you would understand. BTW I weigh 255-260 and am trying to gain some more weight.
    Skim Milk.
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    BOBO I have used skim in the past, but it appears to me after reading several studies that honey may be superior in keeping glycogen levels at an optimum
    I think that Lactose has a lower glycemic index that honey but I recall hearing somewhere (i'll try and dig it up) that it is lousy at restoring glycogen.
    Just an observation what's your opinion have you read any of those studies, they are interesting.
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    im a big fan of mixing 1-2 servings of oatmeal and water in a blender for a couple mins then adding the whey in my shake container.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigmark1972
    BOBO I have used skim in the past, but it appears to me after reading several studies that honey may be superior in keeping glycogen levels at an optimum
    I think that Lactose has a lower glycemic index that honey but I recall hearing somewhere (i'll try and dig it up) that it is lousy at restoring glycogen.
    Just an observation what's your opinion have you read any of those studies, they are interesting.
    Honey will restore them quicker because its made up of glucose and frusctose. THe only difference is that table sugar (same compenents) the monosaccharides are bonded and in honey some are free. Honey is more energy dense too. IT ALL ends up as glucose anyway no matter what the structure.

    As for studies, yes I probably have read them all concerning this subject and it doesn't matter the GI of a carbohydrate, the rate of protein synthesis stays the same. You might restore glycogen faster initially (its actually the same over 24 hours) with a higher GI source but protein synthesis rates stay the same. If you cosume honey that much you will surely get very fat. YOu should be more concerned about increasing proptein synthesis rates thant keeping glycigen stores full 24/7. You have a much better change of adipose storage with your way.



    Carbohydrate nutrition before, during, and after exercise.

    Costill DL.

    The role of dietary carbohydrates (CHO) in the resynthesis of muscle and liver glycogen after prolonged, exhaustive exercise has been clearly demonstrated. The mechanisms responsible for optimal glycogen storage are linked to the activation of glycogen synthetase by depletion of glycogen and the subsequent intake of CHO. Although diets rich in CHO may increase the muscle glycogen stores and enhance endurance exercise performance when consumed in the days before the activity, they also increase the rate of CHO oxidation and the use of muscle glycogen. When consumed in the last hour before exercise, the insulin stimulated-uptake of glucose from blood often results in hypoglycemia, greater dependence on muscle glycogen, and an earlier onset of exhaustion than when no CHO is fed. Ingesting CHO during exercise appears to be of minimal value to performance except in events lasting 2 h or longer. The form of CHO (i.e., glucose, fructose, sucrose) ingested may produce different blood glucose and insulin responses, but the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis is about the same regardless of the structure.
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    And if you REALLY woried about glyocgen storage, understnad it doesn't matter as long as your carbohydrate intake is adequate (low or high GI).


    Effect of different types of high carbohydrate diets on glycogen metabolism in liver and skeletal muscle of endurance-trained rats.

    Garrido G, Guzman M, Odriozola JM.

    Department of Human Performance, National Institute of Physical Education, Madrid, Spain.

    Male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum four different diets containing fructose, sucrose, maltodextrins or starch as the source of carbohydrate (CH). One group was subjected to moderate physical training on a motor-driven treadmill for 10 weeks (trained rats). A second group received no training and acted as a control (sedentary rats). Glycogen metabolism was studied in the liver and skeletal muscle of these animals. In the sedentary rats, liver glycogen concentrations increased by 60%-90% with the administration of simple CH diets compared with complex CH diets, whereas skeletal muscle glycogen stores were not significantly affected by the diet. Physical training induced a marked decrease in the glycogen content in liver (20%-30% of the sedentary rats) and skeletal muscle (50%-80% of the sedentary rats) in animals fed simple (but not complex) CH diets. In liver this was accompanied by a two-fold increase of triacylglycerol concentrations. Compared with simple CH diets, complex CH feeding increased by 50%-150% glycogen synthase (GS) activity in liver, whereas only a slight increase in GS activity was observed in skeletal muscle. In all the animal groups, a direct relationship existed between tissue glucose 6-phosphate concentration and glycogen content (r = 0.9911 in liver, r = 0.7177 in skeletal muscle). In contrast, no relationship was evident between glycogen concentrations and either glycogen phosphorylase activity or adenosine 5'-monophosphate tissue concentration. The results from this study thus suggest that for trained rats diets containing complex CH (compared with diets containing simple CH) improve the glycogenic capacity of liver and skeletal muscle, thus enabling the adequate regeneration of glycogen stores in these two tissues.



    Simple and complex carbohydrate-rich diets and muscle glycogen content of marathon runners.

    Roberts KM, Noble EG, Hayden DB, Taylor AW.

    Faculty of Physical Education, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.

    The effects of simple-carbohydrate (CHO)- and complex-CHO-rich diets on skeletal muscle glycogen content were compared. Twenty male marathon runners were divided into four equal groups with reference to dietary consumption: depletion/simple, depletion/complex, nondepletion/simple, and nondepletion/complex. Subjects consumed either a low-CHO (15% energy [E] intake), or a mixed diet (50% CHO) for 3 days, immediately followed by a high-CHO diet (70% E intake) predominant in either simple-CHO or in complex-CHO (85% of total CHO intake) for another 3 days. Skeletal muscle biopsies and venous blood samples were obtained one day prior to the start of the low-CHO diet or mixed diet (PRE), and then again one day after the completion of the high-CHO diet (POST). The samples were analysed for skeletal muscle glycogen, serum free fatty acids (FFA), insulin, and lactate and blood glucose. Skeletal muscle glycogen content increased significantly (p less than 0.05) only in the nondepletion/simple group. When groups were combined, according to the type of CHO ingested and/or utilization of a depletion diet, significant increases were observed in glycogen content. Serum FFA decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) for the nondepletion/complex group only, while serum insulin, blood glucose, and serum lactate were not altered. It is concluded that significant increases in skeletal muscle glycogen content can be achieved with a diet high in simple-CHO or complex-CHO, with or without initial consumption of a low-CHO diet.


    Effect of different post-exercise sugar diets on the rate of muscle glycogen synthesis.

    Blom PC, Hostmark AT, Vaage O, Kardel KR, Maehlum S.

    Department of Physiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway.

    The effect of repeated ingestions of fructose, sucrose, and various amounts of glucose on muscle glycogen synthesis during the first 6 h after exhaustive bicycle exercise was studied. Muscle biopsies for glycogen determination were taken before and after exercise, and every second hour during recovery. Blood samples for plasma glucose and insulin determination were taken before and after exercise, and every hour during recovery. When 0.35 (low glucose: N = 5), 0.70 (medium glucose: N = 5), or 1.40 (high glucose: N = 5) g.kg-1 body weight of glucose were given orally at 0, 2, and 4 h after exercise, the rates of glycogen synthesis were (mean +/- SE) 2.1 +/- 0.5, 5.8 +/- 1.0, and 5.7 +/- 0.9 mmol.kg-1.h-1, respectively. When 0.70 g.kg-1 body weight of sucrose (medium sucrose: N = 5), or fructose (medium fructose: N = 7) was ingested accordingly, the rates were 6.2 +/- 0.5 and 3.2 +/- 0.7 mmol.kg-1.h-1. Average plasma glucose level during recovery were similar in low glucose, medium glucose, and high glucose groups (5.76 +/- 0.24, 6.31 +/- 0.64, and 6.52 +/- 0.24 mM), while average plasma insulin levels were higher with higher glucose intake (16 +/- 1, 21 +/- 3, and 38 +/- 4 microU.ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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    Wow thanks for all the info.
    If you cosume honey that much you will surely get very fat.
    I have been dropping weight at about 4,000-4500 calories I plan on adding honey simply to get more calories and carbs since I am going to cut most of the fats out of my shake by removing the peanut butter.

    I have a good question for you since I value your seemingly endless knowledge (no sarcasm) If you don't mind could you make a suggestion for me and others I am sure.


    If you had to eat basically strictly from your blender every day and you weighed 255 and were trying to build quality muscle and not get fat, what would you put in it? I use optimum whey about 175 grams per shake but I can up that and would since I am going to be losing the protein from the peanut butter. BTW tuna makes me puke so please don't use that. Basically I drink from this every 3 hours or so, it is sad I have to eat like this but I do.
    I know I may have been dropping weight with my previous shake because it was borderline ketogenic and it made me feel weak and generally crappy. I am not fat now probably around 11-13%. I like how much stronger I feel when I eat good carbs.

    Thanks if you can help.
    LL
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    Gallon of Skim Milk
    Protein Mix of Whey/Cassein
    Grinded Oats
    Canola Oil (virtually no taste)


    Get some canned chicken, Hormel Fat free Chile, Dinty Moore 99% Fat free Turkey Stew.

    Those are some options.

    PB is not a good protein source and honey is not a good carb course in large amounts.


    I don't understand why you have to live out of a blender. Just carry a couple of 12 grain or Whole Grain bagels with you. Pepperidge farms makes some reall good ones that are vedry healthy. THrow some Fat Free Cream cheese on them.
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    I'll check those out, thanks for the suggestions.
  

  
 

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