Hit Training Not Cardio

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    Hit Training Not Cardio


    a friend of mine showed me a book of hit weight training and the more i read it the more it says what we have been doing is wrong

    anybody heard of this???

    its about doing 8-12 exercises 1 set each no rest 3 times a week with each rep 3 sec up 3 sec down.

    workout takes about 10 mins

    crazy thing is as you progress in this hit weights you only workout 2wice a week with the same principles.

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    HIT training


    i read a book called 'Power Factor Training', in it it duiscusses HIT. actually, daily or a few days a week is way too much training and can result in over-training which leads to plateaus... with hit you have one very intense workout, 10-15 minutes, one set of one exercise per body part, only about every three weeks. sounds like it wouldn't work, but it does.. kinda goes against what they teach you in the gym, which is why they make so much money off us!
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    exactly man and this guy that wrote this book trained arnold sergio and almost everything he teaches does go against what we all do [majority]

    in this book also he says power cleans lunges are a waste because there is to much motion in these lifts to build muscle and i just dont know what to think.
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    yep, i actually learned a lot about muscle growth in that book. some say the method was too confusing or that it wasn't accurate because of the inconsistency of the bar travel, but the meat of the stuff was that you need intensity, not a social visit to the gym.
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    Have been using H.I.T. for about 3 years now. Has worked way better than H.V.T for me.

    Takes some time though to figure out it's place and how to use it correctly and efficiently.

    Have you tried a workout using it yet??
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    Hit


    Quote Originally Posted by HITscientist View Post
    Have been using H.I.T. for about 3 years now. Has worked way better than H.V.T for me.

    Takes some time though to figure out it's place and how to use it correctly and efficiently.

    Have you tried a workout using it yet??
    no, haven't really tried it yet, just in the experimental stages. also in that book was a method called "strong zone" training, which was incorporated with their program. this method really interested me because of the logic behind it: we have a large percentage of our strength in the last 3-5 inches of muscle extension, whether it be bench or squats or curls, the last 3-5 inches of the movement is the "strong zone." This enables you to lift serious amounts of weight which increases the overload, which promotes more muscle growth- QUICKER. Like i said, their method of computing all the numbers made it confusing so it never stayed popular. I run a small fitness training biz, Muscle Factory of Idaho, and one of the methods i will use is 'strong zone', along with HIT. not sure what HVT is?
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    HVT = High Volume Training
    aka: Traditional 3-4 sets with some type of rep scheme

    The position you are talking about (the last 3-5 inches) would be the contracted position correct? Yes a very beneficial area but depending on each machine/tool (aka dumbell/barbell) and the type of movement, the contracted position could also be the easiest..... Don't neglect the other parts as well
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    strong zone


    Quote Originally Posted by HITscientist View Post
    HVT = High Volume Training
    aka: Traditional 3-4 sets with some type of rep scheme

    The position you are talking about (the last 3-5 inches) would be the contracted position correct? Yes a very beneficial area but depending on each machine/tool (aka dumbell/barbell) and the type of movement, the contracted position could also be the easiest..... Don't neglect the other parts as well
    yes! the contracted position. it IS the easiest because that's where most of the strength is naturally. think of when you fall face first and catch yourself, you stop with your arms fully extended, or within 3-5 inches, you don't go all the way down like a push-up, that's the weak zone. i use the bench press as an example usually. the weak zone is the lower part of the movement, from the chest, because of the disadvantage of the joints and muscles, the leverage isn't great. but at the strong zone your muscles have the advantage to lift far more than you think...
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    True, a VERY strong zone, but still not all points of the muscle fiber are being exhausted.

    Why not very the weight in different zones to get maximum inroad/hypertrophy??...
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    Quote Originally Posted by HITscientist View Post
    True, a VERY strong zone, but still not all points of the muscle fiber are being exhausted.

    Why not very the weight in different zones to get maximum inroad/hypertrophy??...
    i'm looking to get maximum results from progressive overload, not sure if that can be achieved in a different zone, can you explain? also, explain the HVT program. always getting info on new techniques...
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcneil0303 View Post
    exactly man and this guy that wrote this book trained arnold sergio and almost everything he teaches does go against what we all do [majority]

    in this book also he says power cleans lunges are a waste because there is to much motion in these lifts to build muscle and i just dont know what to think.
    I think you may be thinking of Vince Gironda. Power Factor training was written by Pete Sisco And John Little. Power factor training is based on doing partials in the final third of a movement.......The beliefs of Gironda and those of Power Factor traing are very different.
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    What about selecting weights that are either the same or vary depending on the exercise and the tool? Work each zone to fatigue in order of hardest to easiest or vice versa (with weight adjustment) occassionally.

    Check out "Jreps" (google it) to make more sense of it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HITscientist View Post
    What about selecting weights that are either the same or vary depending on the exercise and the tool? Work each zone to fatigue in order of hardest to easiest or vice versa (with weight adjustment) occassionally.

    Check out "Jreps" (google it) to make more sense of it.
    good stuff, taking notes... thanks for the info. also, i looked up vince gironda, he was way ahead of his time. taking notes on his stuff, too. thanks for the jreps tip. i do agree that it's good to work each zone (of the muscle) to fatigue in order to get the whole muscle to adapt occasionally; i don't really know if just one type of overload would incorporate the whole muscle each exercise, as in the partials/strong zone movements, but i will be curious to find out what type of results i get...
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    There's another form of training similar to HIT called Slow Motion Training, if follows a similar premise.

    You break your workouts into 3-4 body parts (ie, Bis Tris Shoulders--Chest Back--Legs for a three day split), and you pick 2-3 exercises per body part.

    Do one or two sets of one rep for each exercise chosen. Use the same weight you would for 6-8 "traditional" reps but use 10-1-4 timing for a single rep. That's 10 seconds on the concentric (up) motion, 1 second pause, 4 seconds on the eccentric (down) motion. That one extremely slow motion will be the entire set. It will make you sore like none other, and it works.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DumbbellBlond View Post
    There's another form of training similar to HIT called Slow Motion Training, if follows a similar premise.

    You break your workouts into 3-4 body parts (ie, Bis Tris Shoulders--Chest Back--Legs for a three day split), and you pick 2-3 exercises per body part.

    Do one or two sets of one rep for each exercise chosen. Use the same weight you would for 6-8 "traditional" reps but use 10-1-4 timing for a single rep. That's 10 seconds on the concentric (up) motion, 1 second pause, 4 seconds on the eccentric (down) motion. That one extremely slow motion will be the entire set. It will make you sore like none other, and it works.
    I don't really see why anyone would want to do a cadence like that. If anything the eccentric motion should have a slower rep speed. I'm very sure you would get sore from this method , but that does not mean its going to be productive.
    This sounds like a varation of time under tension training. Certainly to each his own, but for size and strength, an explosive concentric rep followed by a controlled return is likely to produce the best results.
    One thing to note is the association of the pump and soreness after training is to often to used to make a judgement about the quality of a training session. Powerlifters do not work for the pump and are usually among the largest and strongest athletes. HIT advocates are concered with compressing work over time. If these techniques are used then trainee must realize how infrequent these workouts must be.
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    Wayne Wescott is the guy that did all the research, google "wayne wescott slow motion training" he did a couple of published studies about it that got a lot of press.

    It gives significant gains in strength rather than in size... it's more about the improvement of absolute strength than anything else. I haven't seen the entire study, so I don't know how it works in its fine mechanics, but I know it does work. I only mention it because it's in a similar mode as the topic of the initial post.

    And yes, the 10-1-4 can be reversed to 4-1-10, and different intervals can be used, a range from 10-20 seconds for one rep is all within the appropriate range. Up to four or even six reps can be repeated for one set (depending on the length of the reps I would assume).
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    Quote Originally Posted by DumbbellBlond View Post
    Wayne Wescott is the guy that did all the research, google "wayne wescott slow motion training" he did a couple of published studies about it that got a lot of press.

    It gives significant gains in strength rather than in size... it's more about the improvement of absolute strength than anything else. I haven't seen the entire study, so I don't know how it works in its fine mechanics, but I know it does work. I only mention it because it's in a similar mode as the topic of the initial post.

    And yes, the 10-1-4 can be reversed to 4-1-10, and different intervals can be used, a range from 10-20 seconds for one rep is all within the appropriate range. Up to four or even six reps can be repeated for one set (depending on the length of the reps I would assume).
    I don't mean be closed off to any type of training, but for gains in strength, force will always be king. Size is a different story , progressive overload in anyway can lead to the thickening of muscle fibers. Thats why there are a ton of ways to train. So, to lift the heavy weight possible over a prescribed rep range, I dont know why one would want to slow the postive portion of the rep down. There could be some neuro- potentiation involved but that may be it. I'll def. give it a look though.
  

  
 

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