2 questions about deadlift/racklift

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    2 questions about deadlift/racklift


    I found out my 1RM for deadlift. I tried basing my workouts around this number like 70% of my 1RM etc. When I went to actually perform these I couldn't even come close to the reps I should have been able to do, why? I think it's because I have stayed in the lower rep ranges, 5 or less, for a very long time, a few years actually.

    Second, I performed racklifts from a different position the other day. I would say it was from my upper shin, higher than mid shin and lower than my knee, using a reebok stepper. It was a good workout and yesterday I woke up and the middle of my back was sore. Just above my lower back, but it's not my lats or traps. Is this just a different part of my erector spinae? I've never had just this area sore before, it's pretty cool. I'm curious to know more about it and if it may be a weak point in my lift.

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    Essentially there are two types of strength: one-rep strength (muscular strength), and muscular endurance. If your max squat is 350lbs, and mine is only 300lbs, then you have more muscular strength than me. On the flip side, if I can lift 250lbs 10 times, but you can only lift it 8 times, then I have more muscular endurance than you. Some people specifically train for maximum strength, such as powerlifters, while other people may train for muscular endurance. Many believe, including me, that bodybuilders need both to be well-balanced. If all you ever train for is muscular endurance, lifting a lower weight in a higher rep range (10-12, 10-12, ect..) then you will still be able to cause muscle overload and induce hypertrophy to grow, considering your diet is appropriate, but you may tend to look soft. Heavy weight and power sets build muscle density, which is why many bodybuilders will incorporate the best of all worlds into their training; starting a set of a particular exercise in a higher rep range, and progressively increasing the weight, decreasing the amount of reps they're able to perform, thus increasing power. Heavy weight and power sets build muscle density, however, in bodybuilding, muscle endurance is equally as important as sheer strength, for numerous reasons. So combing the best of all worlds is one of the better routes to go, in mine and other's opinions.

    Back to your first question... If you mainly train using all power sets, staying in the lower rep ranges, then you'll tend to be more powerful and able to lift more weight. But if you lower the weight you may not be able to lift it X number of times compared to the next guy who may not be as "strong" as you, who trains for muscular endurance. So combing different principles in your training, training for both power and endurance, in the long run is a good bet to take. You'll be able to build muscle density, and be able to throw up a lot of weight, but you'll also have more muscle endurance. And remember, in bodybuilding, weight is the means to an end (as opposed to another sport such as weight lifting and powerlifting), but there are advantages to using power sets in bodybuilding (increasing muscle density).

    As far as your second question goes... If you change the angle of movement on any exercise, you're going to tend to recruit different muscles, or different areas of the muscle, to aid in the lift. Now sometimes you explicitly do this, such as flat bench compared to incline and decline bench, or variations of biceps curls, and so on and so forth. However, sometimes when you change the angle of movement, you could be doing more harm than good. I'm not saying you were doing anything wrong, I'm just saying that when you alter the position of your body relevant to the weight your lifting, relevant to gravity, your body will adapt accordingly, be it for the better or not. Just be careful when you try something new, and always listen to what your body is telling you!

    Hope that helped some.. Good luck with your training bro!
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    deadlifts don't fit well into percentages. Your back was sore because you did deads from a low pin with no leg drive. I feel they expose my back to injury a little too much when i do them. So i have stopped. When i want to work the upper part of my dead i do deads with chains.
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    Thanks for the great replies.

    Over the past 8 months I've been transitioning from deadlifts to squats. I had a leg injury which messed up my balance and ROM of my squats so I had been concentrating on deadlifts for a very long time.

    I recently got back into squats and amazingly suddenly out of no where at the beginning of spring semester I got full ROM back in my squat. Now I'm trying to balance training both exercises. I find that full squats really work my lower back so I've been researching racklifts as an alternative to deadlifts.

    I've been prone to severe back pumps in the past but now that I know how to use taurine properly they've faded quite a bit.

    My squat is 100lbs less than my max deadlift so I'm hoping to close that gap as much as possible by the end of this year. However, I'm plateauing on my squat and because I'm not training my deadlift as much I think it's dropping in weight.
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    Most raw lifters who are not genetically gifted squatters have a higher deadlift than squat.
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    As said before deadlifts don't fit well into percentages.

    As far as feeling the middle of your back is sore it's your erector spinae and possibly the lower area of your traps.
    The thing is that is where you should always feel it when doing deads. if you have constant severe back pumps and extreme soreness postworkout in your lower back/upper glutes while doing conventional deads something is wrong with your technique, to much round lifting with your lower back.
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Batman View Post
    As said before deadlifts don't fit well into percentages.

    As far as feeling the middle of your back is sore it's your erector spinae and possibly the lower area of your traps.
    The thing is that is where you should always feel it when doing deads. if you have constant severe back pumps and extreme soreness postworkout in your lower back/upper glutes while doing conventional deads something is wrong with your technique, to much round lifting with your lower back.

    Also about the form, people who teach themselves to deadlift tend to start too far over the bar. If you could film yourself from the side i could give you a good critique.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcp2 View Post
    Also about the form, people who teach themselves to deadlift tend to start too far over the bar. If you could film yourself from the side i could give you a good critique.
    My arms are perpendicular to the ground at the beginning of the movement and the bar is an inch or less away from my shins.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoTiV View Post
    My arms are perpendicular to the ground at the beginning of the movement and the bar is an inch or less away from my shins.

    You may be too far over the bar, you want to have your shoulders behind it and on your heels. It is kind of hard to critique form through a discussion though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcp2 View Post
    You may be too far over the bar, you want to have your shoulders behind it and on your heels. It is kind of hard to critique form through a discussion though.
    Thanks, the way I described it is the way I learned through videos and tutorials. I'll definitely look more into other articles and videos discussing form.

    I could try to make a video but it's probably unlikely.
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