Training plan for next 12 months

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  1. Ok, first 2are from 2mknths ago, about 8lbs lighter:





    Here are pics from a couple days ago:




  2. @AlexPowell
    So as i mentioned in your diet thread, im gonna change the eating program a bit after vacation. Get back on the 19th. So i drew up a rough plan and here it is.

    Pre workout: Ĺ scoop vitargo
    PWO: 2 scoops oats, 2 scoops protein

    Lunch: 9oz grassfed beef, 1C rice, veggies

    Afternoon: 1 scoop oats, 1 scoop protein
    Dinner: 9oz grassfed beef, 1C rice, veggies

    After work: 9oz grassfed beef
    Pre bed: 1C egg whites

    About 2850 calories, 100g fat, 300g protein, 167g carbs

    Those are rough numbers but oughta be awfully close. Thoughts?
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  3. No opinion here, I'm just watching....
    Life is fair it's your expectations that aren't.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by jrock645 View Post
    @AlexPowell
    So as i mentioned in your diet thread, im gonna change the eating program a bit after vacation. Get back on the 19th. So i drew up a rough plan and here it is.

    Pre workout: Ĺ scoop vitargo
    PWO: 2 scoops oats, 2 scoops protein

    Lunch: 9oz grassfed beef, 1C rice, veggies

    Afternoon: 1 scoop oats, 1 scoop protein
    Dinner: 9oz grassfed beef, 1C rice, veggies

    After work: 9oz grassfed beef
    Pre bed: 1C egg whites

    About 2850 calories, 100g fat, 300g protein, 167g carbs

    Those are rough numbers but oughta be awfully close. Thoughts?
    The only suggestion I would make is to get rid of the vitago, protein powder and egg whites and replace them with real food
    The beef doesn't have to be grass fed, as long as it is pasture raised

    Remember to make 5% adjustments, easily done by adding / removing rice. Remember to salt your food fairly heavily as well
    I am a carnivore (diet based exclusively on meat)- Here is my diet and training log
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/303950-im-carnivore.html

  5. Scheduling wise, the 2 shakes are hard to do away with. I workout first thing in the AM, so i do the shot of vitargo. Workout, then immediately go to work.

    Im gonna try this, and if i can find a way to flex the schedule to allow me to stop and eat another meal in the day, ill make the adjustment. I work 10-12 hour shifts 5-6 days per week so its all about getting on an eating schedule that jives with work.

    Question. Ive taken a liking to quinoa of late. Now that i have this written, im thinking of doing quinoa instead of the rice. Any issue with that?
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by jrock645 View Post
    Scheduling wise, the 2 shakes are hard to do away with. I workout first thing in the AM, so i do the shot of vitargo. Workout, then immediately go to work.

    Im gonna try this, and if i can find a way to flex the schedule to allow me to stop and eat another meal in the day, ill make the adjustment. I work 10-12 hour shifts 5-6 days per week so its all about getting on an eating schedule that jives with work.

    Question. Ive taken a liking to quinoa of late. Now that i have this written, im thinking of doing quinoa instead of the rice. Any issue with that?
    I have no idea about quinoa, but I'm sure it's fine if you can eat enough of it
    I am a carnivore (diet based exclusively on meat)- Here is my diet and training log
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/303950-im-carnivore.html

  7. Got back into the gym today after a few days off. Backed the weight off just a bit. Had over reached a little in pursuit of numbers. Not terrible, but rep cadence and form had slipped. Felt good.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by jrock645 View Post
    Got back into the gym today after a few days off. Backed the weight off just a bit. Had over reached a little in pursuit of numbers. Not terrible, but rep cadence and form had slipped. Felt good.
    That rep cadence is brutal and it is easy to slide, especially over time. Smart move to adjust.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by HIT4ME View Post
    That rep cadence is brutal and it is easy to slide, especially over time. Smart move to adjust.
    It really is. Weird how much constant concentration this style of lifting requires. Glad to catch it after a couple of weeks vs letting it get out of hand for months.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by jrock645 View Post
    It really is. Weird how much constant concentration this style of lifting requires. Glad to catch it after a couple of weeks vs letting it get out of hand for months.
    Yeah, it's the type of thing people dont understand about HIT. They just think, "I work hard and 1 set isn't enough". They dont get how hard it actually is. Not everyone, but most.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by HIT4ME View Post
    Yeah, it's the type of thing people dont understand about HIT. They just think, "I work hard and 1 set isn't enough". They dont get how hard it actually is. Not everyone, but most.
    Ha, yeah the “only 1 set?!” people... I wait 30 seconds after I’ve completed each exercise and attempt to do it again. I never get half a rep, much less a full one. Doing another set is unthinkable. The average gym go-er can’t comprehend that.

  12. Only thing you have to think about with HIT is that progress is made by increasing training volume over time. This is done by more weight, more reps or more sets generally. But each week you should be increasing your volume until you are not recovering, then deloading for a while and starting again

    So with HIT, you will progress for a few weeks and be able to increase the weights just fine taking the sets to only concentric failure. After you can't increase the weights any more, you can decrease the weights a little and go to eccentric failure and work up in weights each week taking the set to eccentric failure. Then when you can't do that, you can decrease the weights and add another intensity increasing method like a max isometric hold after eccentric failure and start increasing the weights week to week like that

    A lot of people with HIT, they will see some John Meadows or Mike Mentzer video and do all the tricks straight away. So they have 3 weeks of progress and then what? Time to deload

    If you take your time with adding the intensity raising methods slowly and progressively you can make progress for a lot longer before deloading and starting again
    I am a carnivore (diet based exclusively on meat)- Here is my diet and training log
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/303950-im-carnivore.html

  13. Quote Originally Posted by AlexPowell View Post
    Only thing you have to think about with HIT is that progress is made by increasing training volume over time. This is done by more weight, more reps or more sets generally. But each week you should be increasing your volume until you are not recovering, then deloading for a while and starting again

    So with HIT, you will progress for a few weeks and be able to increase the weights just fine taking the sets to only concentric failure. After you can't increase the weights any more, you can decrease the weights a little and go to eccentric failure and work up in weights each week taking the set to eccentric failure. Then when you can't do that, you can decrease the weights and add another intensity increasing method like a max isometric hold after eccentric failure and start increasing the weights week to week like that

    A lot of people with HIT, they will see some John Meadows or Mike Mentzer video and do all the tricks straight away. So they have 3 weeks of progress and then what? Time to deload

    If you take your time with adding the intensity raising methods slowly and progressively you can make progress for a lot longer before deloading and starting again
    So, I wrote out one of my typically long posts (and it was long even for me) about this response as I kind of disagree....but after typing it all, I'm not sure I necessarily disagree lol. We just have different angles, but I appreciate you ability to think differently than others.

    What I will say is that I think you haven't ever followed HIT specifically and that your training methodology answers its own question in a way - you see less and less progress and eventually have to deload because you are increasing volume in that methodology. With HIT you are using high intensity, but the volume is so low that you don't need much time to recover and the the frequency is low so you have plenty of time to recover. Because of this, it's my experience that I can often go for long, long periods without any deloads on HIT training without seeing a reduction in progress. The reason, really, is because you are deloading between every workout in a way - allowing for maximal recovery and growth. This allows for harder training sessions (you aren't getting more and more worn down) and actually creates very consistent gains and fewer injuries - especially nagging injuries.

    With your philosophy you are using a slightly different tool. You are using planned, temporary overtraining (which upsets some people and they prefer to call it over reaching) to create a deficit and then deloading to allow for recovery all at once. I think this has its merits, but it's a completely different mindset/philosophy than HIT. It's a different tool, and it may actually be an entirely different toolbox. haha.

    With HIT, you don't increase your volume at all- you NEVER want to hit a period where you are not recovering. By that point, you have long since stopped growing - the process is Stimulate ---> Recover ----> Grow. You have to recover before you grow, so if you wait until you've stopped recovering you have stopped super compensating well before that.

  14. Quote Originally Posted by HIT4ME View Post
    So, I wrote out one of my typically long posts (and it was long even for me) about this response as I kind of disagree....but after typing it all, I'm not sure I necessarily disagree lol. We just have different angles, but I appreciate you ability to think differently than others.

    What I will say is that I think you haven't ever followed HIT specifically and that your training methodology answers its own question in a way - you see less and less progress and eventually have to deload because you are increasing volume in that methodology. With HIT you are using high intensity, but the volume is so low that you don't need much time to recover and the the frequency is low so you have plenty of time to recover. Because of this, it's my experience that I can often go for long, long periods without any deloads on HIT training without seeing a reduction in progress. The reason, really, is because you are deloading between every workout in a way - allowing for maximal recovery and growth. This allows for harder training sessions (you aren't getting more and more worn down) and actually creates very consistent gains and fewer injuries - especially nagging injuries.

    With your philosophy you are using a slightly different tool. You are using planned, temporary overtraining (which upsets some people and they prefer to call it over reaching) to create a deficit and then deloading to allow for recovery all at once. I think this has its merits, but it's a completely different mindset/philosophy than HIT. It's a different tool, and it may actually be an entirely different toolbox. haha.

    With HIT, you don't increase your volume at all- you NEVER want to hit a period where you are not recovering. By that point, you have long since stopped growing - the process is Stimulate ---> Recover ----> Grow. You have to recover before you grow, so if you wait until you've stopped recovering you have stopped super compensating well before that.
    At some point you have to provide a novel stimulus though
    I am a carnivore (diet based exclusively on meat)- Here is my diet and training log
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/303950-im-carnivore.html

  15. Quote Originally Posted by AlexPowell View Post
    At some point you have to provide a novel stimulus though
    Well, I guess it's how you define novel. Novelty doesn't seem to have much to do with it, the stimulus just has to be sufficient for a response. Like I said, I've gone for months on HIT without progress stopping.

    I used to do it all the time and over the past 2 years I've focused on 5x5 and using more frequency and volume, etc. But I'm going back to HIT more and more. I feel less worn down on it, I make better progress and there isn't much over thinking for it.

  16. The difficult thing for me is I find it really easy to overtrain. On the whole body routines now and always want to do m/w/f, but thats too much. I can occasionally get away with it, but it has to be just that- occasional. Interested to see how I do going back to a split. Then again, I also do HIIT twice a week. Maybe could do 3 lifting days a week if I dropped the HIIT, but I’m afraid of dropping cardio. Of course, if I’m doing cardio on a day off and decide to do a bit extra because I have time and I’m feeling good, and then throw in the USMC calisthenics just for fun... before I know it I’m pushing myself into overtraining but sometimes it takes a week before the dominos fall. It’s a tricky thing for me.

    Trickiest part for me is if I drop training frequency too much it’s hard to maintain a rhythm. I really need the routine and schedule to stick to.

  17. Quote Originally Posted by HIT4ME View Post
    Well, I guess it's how you define novel. Novelty doesn't seem to have much to do with it, the stimulus just has to be sufficient for a response. Like I said, I've gone for months on HIT without progress stopping.

    I used to do it all the time and over the past 2 years I've focused on 5x5 and using more frequency and volume, etc. But I'm going back to HIT more and more. I feel less worn down on it, I make better progress and there isn't much over thinking for it.
    What do you do when progress stops?
    I am a carnivore (diet based exclusively on meat)- Here is my diet and training log
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/303950-im-carnivore.html

  18. Quote Originally Posted by AlexPowell View Post
    What do you do when progress stops?
    So, I believe if Mentzer was talking he would say it never should stop. Your body wont stop adapting to any sufficient stress unless it is no longer capable of adapting to it. The key is, "Is the stimulus/stress sufficient to activate a response?"

    If you are training to the point of true failure, his theory is (if I interpret correctly) that this should pretty much always trigger a response. If progress stops and you have provided a sufficient stimulus, then the issue is in the 2nd and 3rd phase of the process - you need to allow more time for recovery and adaptation.

    But, in reality, I think it is mentally hard to push yourself that hard for months on end. It isn't necessarily just a physical issue...mentality is a big factor.

    In that case, yes, adjusting a little volume, using drop sets, forced reps, negative training, etc. - can be employed but you still need to compensate for that with rest.

    In other words...yes, use all the tools in the toolbox, but HIT is pretty simple, straight forward and effective and it takes a long time to actually stall out.

    And I am just saying "novel" isnt a bad word for it...but it really just has to be sufficient.

  19. @HIT4ME

    Got a workout in today on vacation and wanted to ask your opinion on something id been thinking about. It concerns rep range. Obviously, there tends to be value in lifting in different rep ranges. As i add weight, reps tend to trend down as i keep adding the weight. Ive noticed its extremely difficult to lift in the HIT style in a range leas than 8-9 reps. The weights just too much to be able to properly control it at the right cadence. I feel like 12-15 reps is the sweet apot for me with this lifting style, or even higher. What are your thoughts on this? What tanges do you typically lift in?

  20. Quote Originally Posted by jrock645 View Post
    @HIT4ME

    Got a workout in today on vacation and wanted to ask your opinion on something id been thinking about. It concerns rep range. Obviously, there tends to be value in lifting in different rep ranges. As i add weight, reps tend to trend down as i keep adding the weight. Ive noticed its extremely difficult to lift in the HIT style in a range leas than 8-9 reps. The weights just too much to be able to properly control it at the right cadence. I feel like 12-15 reps is the sweet apot for me with this lifting style, or even higher. What are your thoughts on this? What tanges do you typically lift in?
    Hey jrock,

    Iím not sure itís the same for everyone. For me I feel best in the 8-12 rep range when doing my HIIT routine.

    But once in a while when I feel the need to pump up the muscle Iíll drop the weight so failure comes at around 20reps on the fourth set. My HIIT is usually 3 sets.

    Likewise, some days I feel like I need more weight so Iíll pick a weight I fail at in the 5-6 rep range on the the first set.

    I hope this helps.

  21. Quote Originally Posted by jrock645 View Post
    @HIT4ME

    Got a workout in today on vacation and wanted to ask your opinion on something id been thinking about. It concerns rep range. Obviously, there tends to be value in lifting in different rep ranges. As i add weight, reps tend to trend down as i keep adding the weight. Ive noticed its extremely difficult to lift in the HIT style in a range leas than 8-9 reps. The weights just too much to be able to properly control it at the right cadence. I feel like 12-15 reps is the sweet apot for me with this lifting style, or even higher. What are your thoughts on this? What tanges do you typically lift in?
    This is funny, because I feel the opposite. Going heavier is easier for me with the higher reps requiring very light weights.

    I think this has to do with the makeup of Type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers. Some people are just geared toward very low reps and some can handle higher reps.

    But I think this also changes based on your training. I have changed quite a bit while training in the 10-15 rep range.

    I have spent time training in such a way that I would do a set to failure at 15 reps, add weight and do a second set to failure at 5 reps. Doing this was interesting because I noticed I could add weight to the 5 rep sets faster than the 15 rep sets.

    I feel like focusing on both rep ranges helps keep progress going. When you hit a spot where you aren't improving at your 15 rep weight, you can start adding weight and working the lower ranges to get progress again.

  22. Quote Originally Posted by HIT4ME View Post
    This is funny, because I feel the opposite. Going heavier is easier for me with the higher reps requiring very light weights.

    I think this has to do with the makeup of Type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers. Some people are just geared toward very low reps and some can handle higher reps.

    But I think this also changes based on your training. I have changed quite a bit while training in the 10-15 rep range.

    I have spent time training in such a way that I would do a set to failure at 15 reps, add weight and do a second set to failure at 5 reps. Doing this was interesting because I noticed I could add weight to the 5 rep sets faster than the 15 rep sets.

    I feel like focusing on both rep ranges helps keep progress going. When you hit a spot where you aren't improving at your 15 rep weight, you can start adding weight and working the lower ranges to get progress again.
    I also progress a lot faster with lower reps
    Dorian Yates said this was why he trained most of the time at 5-8 reps
    I am a carnivore (diet based exclusively on meat)- Here is my diet and training log
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/303950-im-carnivore.html

  23. Quote Originally Posted by AlexPowell View Post
    I also progress a lot faster with lower reps
    Dorian Yates said this was why he trained most of the time at 5-8 reps
    You progress in strength or mass?

  24. Quote Originally Posted by jrock645 View Post
    You progress in strength or mass?
    Until you reach a very high level strength and mass gains are synonymous with each other
    I am a carnivore (diet based exclusively on meat)- Here is my diet and training log
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/303950-im-carnivore.html

  25. Quote Originally Posted by jrock645 View Post
    You progress in strength or mass?
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexPowell View Post
    Until you reach a very high level strength and mass gains are synonymous with each other
    This for the most part. As a muscle gets stronger, it will also get bigger. This may not be a linear correlation, but it is a correlation and despite what people may want to believe, training for strength is the best guage of progress.

    There aren't any 250 pound bodybuilders with 10% bodyfat who can't bench 200.
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