Topic of the week: Is Overtraining BS?

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  1. Subbed so I can read the whole thread. In my opinion it is a thing. Just FAR overstated.


  2. Overtraining is just a state of mind, an illusion if you will. But then, so is the Universe.
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  3. Quote Originally Posted by BennyMagoo79 View Post
    Overtraining is just a state of mind, an illusion if you will. But then, so is the Universe.
    Deep.

  4. There's a reason RPE is being utilized more and more around the "Powerlifting" Community...

    ...it can be fairly easy to overly tax your CNS, when sessions revolve around compound movements.

    Not sure I'd call it "overtraining"...but there should definitely be an acknowledgement of overall exertion when planning weekly and monthly progression...

  5. You cant really overtrain as long as you get the recovery you need, food and sleep are essential and if you use steroids that will help aswell.

    But at some point even with perfect sleep, food and ass your body wont be able to recover intill the next workout so in that sense you could overtrain.

    But 2-3 hours a day 7 days a week wont get you overtrained if you eat and sleep enough. And ofc learn to listen to your body, if a muscle is feeling sore or weird maybe you shouldnt go all in that day.

    Atleast Thats what i belive from reading and doing for a few years now.
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  6. Topic of the week: Is Overtraining BS?


    I've trained Olympic, pro and collegiate athletes that workout 4-6hrs a day for years and they can reach a state of over training with all factors being controlled. And I don't believe many if any but a few in bodybuilding realm will actually overtrain. You may under eat, sleep, stress out, supplement poorly, etc but, not overtrain. Most just don't push hard enough to reach that point.

  7. I don't believe it is any more unlikely to overtrain in bodybuilding than it is training for any other sport.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by ericos_bob View Post
    I don't believe it is any more unlikely to overtrain in bodybuilding than it is training for any other sport.
    It is. Bodybuilders rarely push high intensity loads. They stick to higher rep ranges for the most part.
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  9. There is not over-training itself, but moreso under eating and under recovering.

    In my experience, a lot comes down to the nervous system. Lifting and other strenuous activity stresses the nervous and metabolic system.

    Even if someone is working hard and eating a lot (say a lumberjack or hardcore construction worker), there is still a limit to how much they can train. If not, Olympic Sprinters, Olympic Powerlifters, etc. would train 16 hours a day/7 days a week.

  10. I think it's BS

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Jiigzz View Post
    It is. Bodybuilders rarely push high intensity loads. They stick to higher rep ranges for the most part.
    That is irrelevant, you can stick to higher reps and burn out extremely easily. High reps may allow you to train longer but therefor individuals will exploit that possibility and hey presto we're overtrained again. I'd venture to say an individuals personality is much more significant determinant of how likely one is to OT. Basically anyone who exhibits an extreme drive to push the limits regardless of sport is going to find the toughest aspect of training is to loosen the reigns enough to allow for recovery. It is this drive that causes a great reluctance to ease off when their bodies are saying "I'm worn out and need a break". The kind who protest this seemingly cursed side effect of being human. It's a fine line to straddle as often great gains can be made as is the case with OR.

  12. Quote Originally Posted by ericos_bob View Post
    That is irrelevant, you can stick to higher reps and burn out extremely easily. High reps may allow you to train longer but therefor individuals will exploit that possibility and hey presto we're overtrained again. I'd venture to say an individuals personality is much more significant determinant of how likely one is to OT. Basically anyone who exhibits an extreme drive to push the limits regardless of sport is going to find the toughest aspect of training is to loosen the reigns enough to allow for recovery. It is this drive that causes a great reluctance to ease off when their bodies are saying "I'm worn out and need a break". The kind who protest this seemingly cursed side effect of being human. It's a fine line to straddle as often great gains can be made as is the case with OR.
    Over training has a definition defined in literature; what you posted is not it
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  13. I'm not sure if this will load correctly, but I've tried to attach information directly from one of my books. This book is from the NSCA and is largely considered an - if not the - industry standard. This is a newer version of what was effectively one of my grad level text books. Fantastic reference. Hope this sheds some light. Apologies if it loads as a wall of text.

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    B.S., M.A. - Kinesiology - Exercise Science; Member in good standing - NSCA;
    Strength Trainer; Avid AFC supporter; F*ck To*tenham!

  14. I think it's based on several variables. Persons age, training experience, diet, sleep, and supplementation. In my experience it is possible to get "worn down" as I call it. This usually tends to happen when one of the following slack off; diet, sleep, or supplementation.

    If a person eats above maintenance, gets 8+ hrs of sleep, and hits the major sups consistently(multi, fish oil, bcaa, etc) it takes months of intense training to "overtrain". Many times though a day or two off a month can be very beneficial for my lifts.

    As to the style of lifting, I don't really notice a difference in lifting for weight or reps when it comes to fatigue.

    Just my experience with my body.

  15. To be honest, there are very few cases of actual overtraining. It really is hard to do. I do say though, the central nervous system does need a break now and again
    MUSCLE IS MOVEMENT...MOVEMENT IS LIFE

  16. I think it is.

    But under resting is real.

    Think about it, if you work everyday loading boxes, at first your sore then in a couple weeks your stronger and stop getting sore. But you did it everyday.

  17. Quote Originally Posted by irone93 View Post
    I think it is.

    But under resting is real.

    Think about it, if you work everyday loading boxes, at first your sore then in a couple weeks your stronger and stop getting sore. But you did it everyday.
    But surely there has to be some point where your training volume/frequency/etc. surpasses any amount amount of recovery. You only have 24 hours in a day; in theory if you spend 2-3 hours in the gym twice a day seven days a week busting your ass lifting, good luck finding the time to recover from that. You could say that youíre just not resting enough to sufficiently recover from the above training protocol, but itís the same end result; the training is too much to recover from given there are only 24 hours in a day and seven days in a week.
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  18. Quote Originally Posted by Admin View Post
    You think its real or something that can fixed simply by calories?
    It is definitely real. Training to much will lower your testosterone levels and hinder recovery... Just read an article on it

  19. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    But surely there has to be some point where your training volume/frequency/etc. surpasses any amount amount of recovery. You only have 24 hours in a day; in theory if you spend 2-3 hours in the gym twice a day seven days a week busting your ass lifting, good luck finding the time to recover from that. You could say that you’re just not resting enough to sufficiently recover from the above training protocol, but it’s the same end result; the training is too much to recover from given there are only 24 hours in a day and seven days in a week.
    Nah broski, you can train 24/7 which would be all training and no recovery - that isn't over training, just under recovering. You just need more hours in the day and you're set. Overtraining is extremely rare, it's just under eating or under recovering.

    I hope my sarcasm is coming through over the internet...

  20. Quote Originally Posted by HIT4ME View Post
    Nah broski, you can train 24/7 which would be all training and no recovery - that isn't over training, just under recovering. You just need more hours in the day and you're set. Overtraining is extremely rare, it's just under eating or under recovering.

    I hope my sarcasm is coming through over the internet...
    But what if I eat and nap between my 24/7 sets?
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  21. I remember some of the big guys like Rich Piana talking about how if you're natural you absolutely need to let yourself have more time to recover and you can't do the same massive workouts as a guy on gear. To me it was good to hear someone with experience on both sides be so candid about that truth.

  22. Quote Originally Posted by muscleupcrohn View Post
    But what if I eat and nap between my 24/7 sets?
    Well...if you are on modafinil and IV protein shakes with HMB, leucine and HICA, then of course you are fine. But if you don't have that setup, you are just over reaching of course.

  23. Few hours exercise per week shouldn't be too much for anybody unless eating and sleeping aren't in check

  24. Quote Originally Posted by bonbon View Post
    Few hours exercise per week shouldn't be too much for anybody unless eating and sleeping aren't in check
    there's a big difference between a few hours of running and a few hours of heavy deadlifting though, to be fair.
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