electro shock for mass?? - AnabolicMinds.com

electro shock for mass??

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    electro shock for mass??


    hey guys...

    I've heard and read about bodybuilders using a stim machine for building mass as a type of advanced muscle recovery after workouts....I've used stim before for recomp in therapy but never used it as a mass builder....does it work or is it a bunch of bulls*** ??

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    May help with recovery....isn't going to produce much (if any) hypertrophy.

    Then again, heat therapy may. But you'll need to keep your limbs wrapped in heat for 8-10 hours a day, 3-5 days a week, for several (10+) weeks.

    Eur J Appl Physiol. 2011 Jan;111(1):17-27. Epub 2010 Aug 28.
    Responses of muscle mass, strength and gene transcripts to long-term heat stress in healthy human subjects.

    Goto K, Oda H, Kondo H, Igaki M, Suzuki A, Tsuchiya S, Murase T, Hase T, Fujiya H, Matsumoto I, Naito H, Sugiura T, Ohira Y, Yoshioka T.
    Source

    Department of Physiology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Toyohashi SOZO University, Toyohashi, Aichi, 440-8511, Japan. gotok@sepia.ocn.ne.jp

    Abstract

    The present study was performed to investigate the effects of long-term heat stress on mass, strength and gene expression profile of human skeletal muscles without exercise training. Eight healthy men were subjected to 10-week application of heat stress, which was performed for the quadriceps muscles for 8 h/day and 4 days/week by using a heat- and steam-generating sheet. Maximum isometric force during knee extension of the heated leg significantly increased after heat stress (~5.8%, P < 0.05). Mean cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of vastus lateralis (VL, ~2.7%) and rectus femoris (~6.1%) muscles, as well as fiber CSA (8.3%) in VL, in the heated leg were also significantly increased (P < 0.05). Statistical analysis of microarrays (SAM) revealed that 10 weeks of heat stress increased the transcript level of 925 genes and decreased that of 1,300 genes, and gene function clustering analysis (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery: DAVID) showed that these regulated transcripts stemmed from diverse functional categories. Transcript level of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) was significantly increased by 10 weeks of heat stress (~3.0 folds). UQCRB is classified as one of the oxidative phosphorylation-associated genes, suggesting that heat stress can stimulate ATP synthesis. These results suggested that long-term application of heat stress could be effective in increasing the muscle strength associated with hypertrophy without exercise training.

    PMID:20803152 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    Br
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    This is a very interesting question... especially considering I own a stim machine haha
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    thats a pretty interesting study...im still just curious if using a stim machine on the muscles you workout that day would help or increase mass or recovery time...ive got a personal stim machine but i really do not want to try it out if it has a negative side affect....if anyone knows of a study that would be helpful
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    Quote Originally Posted by the gym rat View Post
    thats a pretty interesting study...im still just curious if using a stim machine on the muscles you workout that day would help or increase mass or recovery time...ive got a personal stim machine but i really do not want to try it out if it has a negative side affect....if anyone knows of a study that would be helpful

    You go first and let me know how it goes
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISU152

    You go first and let me know how it goes
    no thanks man, I don't want to be doin it then find out the electrodes or whatever has a reverse effect...
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    Maybe the night following a workout...

    Sensory level electrical muscle stimulation: effect on markers of muscle injury.

    McLoughlin TJ, Snyder AR, Brolinson PG, Pizza FX.
    Source

    University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606-3390, USA.

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:

    Monophasic high voltage stimulation (MHVS) is widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammation associated with muscle injury. However, limited scientific evidence exists to support its purported benefits in humans.
    OBJECTIVE:

    To examine the efficacy of early initiation of MHVS treatment after muscle injury.
    METHODS:

    In a randomised, cross over design, 14 men performed repetitive eccentric contractions of the elbow flexor muscles followed by either MHVS or control treatment. MHVS treatments were applied five minutes and 3, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after eccentric contractions.
    RESULTS:

    MHVS resulted in a significant reduction (p<0.05) in delayed onset muscle soreness 24 hours after eccentric exercise compared with controls. Elbow extension was significantly increased immediately after administration of MHVS compared with controls. No significant differences were observed between MHVS treatment and controls for maximal isometric strength, flexed arm angle, or arm volume.
    CONCLUSIONS:

    Early and frequent application of MHVS may provide transient relief from delayed onset muscle soreness and short term improvements in range of motion after injurious exercise. However, MHVS treatment may not enhance recovery after muscle injury because of lack of improvements in strength and active range of motion.


    Then again, maybe nothing at all...

    Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, cold, and a combination treatment on pain, decreased range of motion, and strength loss associated with delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Denegar CR, Perrin DH.
    Abstract

    Athletic trainers have a variety of therapeutic agents at their disposal to treat musculoskeletal pain, but little objective evidence exists of the efficacy of the modalities they use. In this study, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) served as a model for musculoskeletal injury in order to: (1) compare the changes in perceived pain, elbow extension range of motion, and strength loss in subjects experiencing DOMS in the elbow flexor muscle group following a single treatment with either transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), cold, a combination of TENS and cold, sham TENS, or 20 minutes of rest; (2) compare the effects of combining static stretching with these treatments; and (3) determine if decreased pain is accompanied by a restoration of strength. DOMS was induced in the non-dominant elbow flexor muscle group in 40 females (age = 22.0 +/- 4.3 yr) with repeated eccentric contractions. Forty-eight hours following exercise, all subjects presented with pain, decreased elbow extension range of motion, and decreased strength consistent with DOMS. Subjects were randomly assigned to 20-minute treatments followed by static stretching. Cold, TENS, and the combined treatment resulted in significant decreases in perceived pain. Treatments with cold resulted in a significant increase in elbow extension range of motion. Static stretching also significantly reduced perceived pain. Only small, nonsignificant changes in muscle strength were observed following treatment or stretching, regardless of the treatment group. These results suggest that the muscle weakness associated with DOMS is not the result of inhibition caused by pain. The results suggest that these modalities are effective in treating the pain and muscle spasm associated with DOMS, and that decreased pain may not be an accurate indicator of the recovery of muscle strength.


    Lack of effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation upon experimentally induced delayed onset muscle soreness in humans.

    Craig JA, Cunningham MB, Walsh DM, Baxter GD, Allen JM.
    Source

    Rehabilitation Sciences Research Group, School of Health Sciences, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, Northern Ireland, UK.

    Abstract

    The aim of the current study, for which ethical approval was obtained, was to assess the hypoalgesic efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) upon acute stage (72 h) experimentally induced delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). TENS naive subjects (n = 48; 24 male and 24 female) were recruited, screened for relevant pathology and randomly allocated to one of four experimental groups: control, placebo, low TENS (200 microseconds; 4 Hz) or high TENS group (200 microseconds; 110 Hz). DOMS was induced in a standardised fashion in the non-dominant elbow flexors of all subjects by repeated eccentric exercise. Subjects attended on three consecutive days for treatment and measurement of elbow flexion, extension and resting angle (Universal goniometer), Mechanical Pain Threshold/tenderness (algometer) and pain (Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)) on a daily basis, plus McGill Pain Questionnaire on the third day only. Measurements were taken before and after treatment under controlled double blinded conditions. Analysis of results using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests showed some inconsistent isolated effects of high TENS (110 Hz) compared to the other conditions upon resting angle and flexion scores; no significant effects were found for any of the other variables. These results provide no convincing evidence for any measurable hypoalgesic effects of TENS upon DOMS-associated pain at the stimulation parameters used here.




    More info regarding the treatment of heat...

    Attenuation of muscle damage by preconditioning with muscle hyperthermia 1-day prior to eccentric exercise.

    Nosaka K, Muthalib M, Lavender A, Laursen PB.
    Source

    School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 100 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA, 6027, Australia. k.nosaka@ecu.edu.au

    Abstract

    This study investigated the hypothesis that muscle damage would be attenuated in muscles subjected to passive hyperthermia 1 day prior to exercise. Fifteen male students performed 24 maximal eccentric actions of the elbow flexors with one arm; the opposite arm performed the same exercise 2-4 weeks later. The elbow flexors of one arm received a microwave diathermy treatment that increased muscle temperature to over 40 degrees C, 16-20 h prior to the exercise. The contralateral arm acted as an untreated control. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction strength (MVC), range of motion (ROM), upper arm circumference, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity and myoglobin concentration were measured 1 day prior to exercise, immediately before and after exercise, and daily for 4 days following exercise. Changes in the criterion measures were compared between conditions (treatment vs. control) using a two-way repeated measures ANOVA with a significance level of P < 0.05. All measures changed significantly following exercise, but the treatment arm showed a significantly faster recovery of MVC, a smaller change in ROM, and less muscle soreness compared with the control arm. However, the protective effect conferred by the diathermy treatment was significantly less effective compared with that seen in the second bout performed 4-6 weeks after the initial bout by a subgroup of the subjects (n = 11) using the control arm. These results suggest that passive hyperthermia treatment 1 day prior to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage has a prophylactic effect, but the effect is not as strong as the repeated bout effect.


    PMID:17089155 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED View Post
    Maybe the night following a workout...




    Then again, maybe nothing at all...



    More info regarding the treatment of heat...
    Im pretty much torn on the subject, ive been an apprentance to my athletic trainer at school for a semester or two now and i already knew that the stim reduces soreness by breaking up the lactic acid build up in the injury but it breaks it up with a rather "violent" process in the muscle with controlled mhvs of 1-5 second bursts....

    this is an interesting topic but i think its best to leave it up to havin some kind of doctor or someone along those lines give an actual medical opinion on the subject....If were worried about it then we shouldnt do it so until an actual medical opinion is given i would say lets stay away from it cause i know im no expet
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    Quote Originally Posted by the gym rat View Post
    Im pretty much torn on the subject, ive been an apprentance to my athletic trainer at school for a semester or two now and i already knew that the stim reduces soreness by breaking up the lactic acid build up in the injury but it breaks it up with a rather "violent" process in the muscle with controlled mhvs of 1-5 second bursts....

    this is an interesting topic but i think its best to leave it up to havin some kind of doctor or someone along those lines give an actual medical opinion on the subject....If were worried about it then we shouldnt do it so until an actual medical opinion is given i would say lets stay away from it cause i know im no expet
    I don't believe it works via breaking up lactic acid (as LA has little to do with muscular injury/soreness), but rather by inducing rapid contractions without an actual change in ROM around the joint.

    I would think (physiologically) that estim would result in anabolic cellular signaling via changes in ion concentrations (mainly calcium) and perhaps stretch within the muscle cell, thus leading to a greater stimulus for protein synthesis and removelling/recovery.

    Now, whether it would benefit or harm...I think the research, although limited, suggests that it may help recover from an initial unfamiliar stimulus (such as adding in heavy negatives) but will not have much of an impact upon future loadings in a similar manner (i.e.: the same heavy negatives the next session, and session after that).

    Br
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED

    I don't believe it works via breaking up lactic acid (as LA has little to do with muscular injury/soreness), but rather by inducing rapid contractions without an actual change in ROM around the joint.

    I would think (physiologically) that estim would result in anabolic cellular signaling via changes in ion concentrations (mainly calcium) and perhaps stretch within the muscle cell, thus leading to a greater stimulus for protein synthesis and removelling/recovery.

    Now, whether it would benefit or harm...I think the research, although limited, suggests that it may help recover from an initial unfamiliar stimulus (such as adding in heavy negatives) but will not have much of an impact upon future loadings in a similar manner (i.e.: the same heavy negatives the next session, and session after that).

    Br
    well here goes nothing.....I will try it for a week and report results next Saturday
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    i'll stop by n see
  

  
 

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