Lots Of Programs

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  1. Newtonselite, I appreciate you taking the time to post these programs. This thread will definitely come in handy for me. My current routine is exhausted.
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  2. Awesome. Thanks for compiling this list. Solid routines for sure.
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  3. No worries! More to come along over time

  4. Escalating Density Training
    by Charles Staley


    Q2 (Pronounced "Q-squared") this is a portion of training called Escalating Density Training, or EDT, and it constitutes the hypertrophy portion of Q2 training.

    What Causes Muscle Growth?

    If I may dispense with the usual formalities and get right down to brass tacks, so to speak, I'd like you to consider the following statement:

    "When a biological system experiences a challenge, it modifies itself in order to be able to more easily meet similar challenges in the future."

    Now, in my opinion, if you're interested in growing muscle, that statement contains everything you'll ever need to know. Muscle is in fact a biological system, and it grows (or atrophies) in direct proportion to the amount of work it is forced to do.

    Of course, all training systems approach this reality by suggesting an endless array of often conflicting recommendations regarding exercise selection, number of reps and sets, length of rest periods, and so on. One system says 3 sets of 10; another says one set to failure. One system recommends resting 1 minute between sets, another 3 minutes. One system employs partial range of motion, another full range of motion. On and on it goes. What gets lost in all this is the simple reality that whatever system allows you to do the most work per unit of time is what causes muscle to grow in an optimal manner.

    That being said, the next question is "What is work?" And the answer is reflected in the following equation: M x D = W (M= mass or weight, D = distance, and W = work)

    Every training principle you've ever heard of, plus most of the ones you've never heard of, are designed to allow you to do more and more work over the weeks and months. And Q2 is no exception. In fact, let me be the first to say that there is absolutely NOTHING new here. The only thing that's new is the way I'm "framing" or presenting the information. In a sense, the EDT system is just a foolproof way to ensure that you perform more and more work in each workout that you do. The benefits of the EDT method are as follows:

    • Motivation: When you do an EDT workout, you know when it'll start, but more importantly, you know precisely when it will END. Also, you know exactly what you need to do in that time period. In other words, you have an explicit goal — a definite purpose, and a well-defined time frame for accomplishing your goal. You have to experience this in order to fully appreciate how easily it is to get "up" for ED workouts.

    • Auto-Regulation: Forget about sets and reps. Forget about rest intervals. Forget about time under tension. I'm totally serious — all of these parameters distract you from the essential truth — that you need to do more work this time than you did last time. It literally took me over 20 years of studying these factors to realize that they don't matter. So take out your training log, see how many total repetitions you did during your last workout for the same muscle groups, start the stopwatch, and beat that number.That's all. If you do this every workout, you'll grow. And if you don't you won't.

    • Clarity of Progression: EDT workouts don't allow you to hide from the essential truth of training — progression. You may think you were abiding by the law of progressive overload before, but with EDT, you KNOW you are.
    EDT involves doing a workout, measuring how much work was done, and then consistently and gradually increasing that amount of work. When you do, muscle will grow, metabolism will increase, and you'll have a leaner, more muscular body. Now, as it turns out, there's a paradox at work here. Because good fatigue management strategies allow you to do a lot more work, you'll end up plenty sore anyway, so for you masochists out there, fear not — you'll be in plenty of pain.

    The EDT Program

    Monday: Lats/Elbow Extensors
    First 20-Minute Time Frame
    A-1: Chins (palms facing you)
    A-2: Lying EZ-Bar Tricep Extensions
    Second 20-Minute Time Frame
    A-1: Seated Rows (Low cable or machine)
    A-2: Reverse-Grip Tricep Pushdowns (palms up)

    Tuesday: Lower Body/Trunk
    First 20-Minute Time Frame
    A-1: Back Extensions (a.k.a. hyper extensions)
    A-2: Ball Crunches (crunches off a Swiss Ball)
    Second 20-Minute Time Frame
    A-1: Leg extensions
    A-2: Leg Curls

    Thursday: Pecs/Elbow Flexors
    First 20-Minute Time Frame
    A-1: Strive Bench Presses (or any machine bench press variant)
    A-2: Low Cable Curls
    Second 20-Minute Time Frame
    A-1: Hammer Incline Presses
    A-2: Preacher Hammer Curls

    Friday: Lower Body
    First 20-Minute Time Frame
    A-1: Alternating Lunges
    A-2: Sit-Ups
    Second 20-Minute Time Frame
    A-1: Seated Calf Raises
    A-2: *Russian Twists

    *Sit on the ground or a bench with knees bent to 90 degrees and lean your trunk back to 45 degrees. Keeping this trunk angle, and with arms out straight, fingers interlocked and arms maintained at 90 degrees to the upper body, rotate the trunk from the waist (not the shoulders!)

    Comments on Exercise Selection
    This is not a rehab or functional-strength program. It's designed for lean-mass development only. The inclusion of machine-based exercises in the above cycle is based on my preference to avoid technical or coordination-intensive exercises (such as squats or deadlifts) while in a "panicked" state of mind. In theory, this program can be done using more technical lifts as long as you remain "present" or "in the moment." However, for your first exposure to EDT, I strongly suggest sticking to the program as provided.


    Procedure

    • Each workout consists of two 20-minute time frames separated by a short (5-10 minute) rest period. In each time frame, you'll perform two exercises, for a total of 4 exercises per workout.

    • In each time frame, the two exercises are performed in alternating fashion, back and forth, until the time frame has elapsed.

    • After warming up the first 2 exercises, select a load that approximates a 10-12 RM for each exercise. Ideally, the weight used for each exercise should be equally difficult.

    • Sets, reps, and rest intervals: Generally, most people will find it most effective to do higher repetition (but not maximal effort) sets and shorter rests at the beginning, and then gradually progress to less reps per set and longer rests as fatigue accumulates. As an example, you might begin by performing sets of 6 with very short (15-30 second) rests. As you begin to fatigue, you'll increase your rest intervals as you drop down to sets of 4, then 2, and as the 20-minute time limit approaches, you might crank out a few singles in an effort of accomplish as many repetitions as possible in 20 minutes.


    NOTE: Do not perform early sets to failure, or even near failure. My recommended starting point is to do 1/2 of what is possible (e.g., 5 reps with a 10-RM weight) at the beginning of the time frame. As the time limit approaches however, you'll find yourself working at or near failure as you attempt to break your rep record.

    • Progression: Each time you repeat the workout; your objective is to simply perform more total repetitions in the same time frame. Apply the 20/5 rule: as soon as you can increase the total number of reps by 20% or more, start the next workout withy 5% more weight and start over.
    And that's essentially it. No pre-ordained numbers of sets, reps, or rest periods. It's entirely up to you. Your job is only to complete the 20-minute work period, and then improve on it the next time around.

    Charles Staley is a sports performance specialist and director of Integrated Sport Solutions in Las Vegas, Nevada. A former martial arts competitor and trainer, Staley is also an Olympic weightlifting coach, as well as a master's level track and field competitor (discus event). He has coached elite athletes from many sports, including martial arts, luge, boxing, track & field, bobsled, football, Olympic weightlifting, and bodybuilding. Staley has written hundreds of published articles, and has lectured extensively on the topics of human performance and sport training.

  5. Thank yor for the excellent info
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  6. MAX STIM TRAINING:

    M-Time – The Max Factor


    M-Time is the time between each rep, after each rep the weight should be racked or set down and gotten completely out of your hands for the duration of the M-Time. This time can be manipulated as advancing fatigue ensues, IE first few reps use 3-5 seconds, next 5 to 10 - use 7 seconds, during the last 5 use 10 seconds. The starting time is usually going to be dictated by your own recovery from repetitive contractions and the intensity you are using. As the cycle progresses the M-Time may need to be increased to combat the effects of fatigue from heavier loading. The ideal starting time will vary and some experimentation will probably be needed to find the adequate time to use. In any case the M-Time should be used from the very first rep.


    Frequency



    As we’ve mentioned in the previous chapter once per week isn’t going to cut it when you are trying to build as much muscle tissue in the shortest amount of time possible. With that said the workout is set up in an alternating workout fashion, A&B routines, they are both full body workouts but may be split to upper/lower, push/pull or whatever you deem necessary to fit into your training schedule.



    Each Body part should be hit at least 2 times per week with at least 1 set of the primary movement and if needed 1 set of the secondary.



    A typical implementation would be-



    Monday and Thursday A routine,

    Tuesday and Friday B routine, this can be arranged in any fashion depending on your training level or schedule.



    Other examples;

    3X week

    Week 1

    Monday-A

    Wends-B

    Fri-A

    Week 2

    Monday-B

    Wends-A

    Fri-B



    2X week

    Monday-A

    Thursday-B



    Rep Cadence and Tempo


    Each Compound movement IE the first movement for each exercise should have a cadence of as fast as possible concentric, a controlled eccentric. After each complete rep is performed the weight should be racked for the M-Time being used. (see M-Time above)



    Each isolation or subsequent movement (if chosen to do so) should be performed with as fast as possible concentric and a controlled eccentric. Again after each rep the weight should be racked for the M-time being used.



    Rest Between Sets


    If choosing to do multiple sets, I only recommend one, the rest between sets should allow for enough strength recovery to successfully complete at least 80% of the same number of reps as the previous set.



    Working in a circuit fashion may be advantageous as this may allow enough time between sets but if working in a gym where equipment availability is an issue then simply use a rest period as described in the previous paragraph.



    Bicep and Tricep Work



    Although direct bicep and tricep work may not be necessary since many of the pulling and pushing movements already activate these muscles many trainees simply can not have a successful workout without the addition of direct upper arm work. With this in mind you may add in any of your favorite bi and or tri work but I do not recommend doing this more than 1 or 2X week and I recommend the volume be kept low for each workout these are used. If you do I also recommend you use the same set up, a compound followed by an isolation exercise that concentrates on stretch, racking the weight between reps.



    Bicep Recommendation-following your last set of Back exercises add 1 or 2 sets of incline DB curl, concentration curl, BB curl or whatever isolation exercise you choose to use.



    Tricep Recommendation-following your last pressing/pushing movement for chest or shoulders add 1 or 2 sets of Tricep Extensions, pushdowns or whatever isolation exercise you choose to use.



    Muscle Specific



    This setup may also be used in conjunction with any individual muscle group in order to specifically induce growth to lagging muscle groups or address symmetry issues.



    Progression and starting intensity.


    The progression is set up in an undulating linear fashion. There are 3 phases to this program.



    Phase 1- Using your 10 RM load 4 workouts per week

    Phase 2- Using your 8 RM load 4 workouts per week

    Phase 3- Using your 6 RM load 4 workouts per week



    Each phase starts out at 75% of the RM for that phase and increases over the duration to a maximum of 110% of the RM.



    Example.

    10RM load = 100 lbs

    Week 1

    Workout 1, A routine- 20 Reps –75 lbs.

    M-Time- 1 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.

    Workout 2, B routine- 20 reps –75 lbs.

    M-Time- 1 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.



    Workout 3, A routine-20 reps – 80 Lbs

    M-Time- 2 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.

    Workout 4, B routine- 20 reps –80 lbs.

    M-Time- 2 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.



    Week 2

    Workout 5, A routine-20 reps – 85 Lbs

    M-Time- 3 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.

    Workout 6, B routine- 20 reps –85 lbs.

    M-Time- 3 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.



    Workout 7, A routine-20 reps – 90 Lbs

    M-Time- 4 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.

    Workout 8, B routine- 20 reps –90 lbs.

    M-Time- 4 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.



    Week 3

    Workout 9, A routine-20 reps – 95 Lbs

    M-Time- 3 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.

    Workout 10, B routine- 20 reps –95 lbs.

    M-Time- 3 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.



    Workout 11, A routine-20 reps – 100 Lbs

    M-Time- 4 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.

    Workout 12, B routine- 20 reps –100 lbs.

    M-Time- 4 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.



    Week 4

    Workout 13, A routine-20 reps – 105 Lbs

    M-Time- 5 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.

    Workout 14, B routine- 20 reps –105 lbs.

    M-Time- 5 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.



    Workout 15, A routine-20 reps – 110 Lbs

    M-Time- 6 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.

    Workout 16, B routine- 20 reps –110 lbs.

    M-Time- 6 sec. Or whatever is needed to complete 20 reps without achieving any significant burn.



    For planning your routine please download the Excel Spreadsheet here



    Increasing the reps-The system is based on 20 reps throughout the cycle. This can be changed if desired. However I do recommend trying to stick to at least 15- 20 reps as it allows sufficient TUT and it is much easier than trying to identify varying reps when fatigue is manipulated in this way.



    Decreasing the duration- to decrease the duration from 12 weeks to fewer simply remove the duplicate intensity workouts IE each or every other workout would increase in intensity.



    Work Out A
    Follow the Exercise order, thigh and calf work may be put last if you prefer

    Thighs-

    Squat or Leg Press

    Super set with Leg Ext or Sissy Squat (if desired)

    Leg Curl

    Super Set with SLDL or Good Morning (if desired)

    Calves-

    Standing Calve Raise

    Superset with Donkey Calve Raise on Blocks (if desired)

    Back-

    Wide Grip Pronated Pull Up/Down

    Bent BB Row to Bottom of Rib Cage or similar

    Chest-

    Flat Bench BB/Dips or DB Bench Press

    Superset with Fly (if desired)

    Shoulder-

    Military Press or Shoulder DB Press

    Superset with DB Incline Lateral Raise (if desired)

    Traps, Rear Deltoid-

    BB Laying Chin Row or Seated High Row

    Superset with Prone or Bent Shoulder Lateral (if desired)



    Workout B
    Thigh-

    Squat or Leg Press

    Super set with Leg Ext or Sissy Squat (if desired)

    Leg Curl

    Super Set with SLDL or Good Morning (if desired)

    Calves-

    Standing Calve Raise

    Superset with Donkey Calve Raise on Blocks (if desired)

    Back-

    Narrow Grip Supinated Pull Up/Down

    Bent BB Row narrow grip to beltline

    Chest-

    20 Degree BB or DB Bench Press

    Superset with Incline Fly (if desired)

    Shoulder-

    Primary-Upright Row

    Secondary-Superset with Upright Lateral Raise (if desired)

    Traps, Rear Deltoid-

    DB or BB Shrugs Seated or Standing

    Superset with Laying or Bent Shoulder Lateral (if desired)



    If knees, shoulders or back is of concern then substitution of exercises can be done as long as plane of movement and degree of stretch is relatively equal for the substitutions. Whether done on free weight or machine should not make a difference. Machines will make this program inherently easier as the racking movement is already accommodated for in most machines. When substituting exercises always keep safety as your top priority.

  7. If anyone has any other programs not listed here already and wants to contribute plz add them in

  8. Amazing thread and glad I came across it.

    Have some new ideas!

    Thanks
    Formutech Nutrition | Online/Social Media Rep
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  9. Quote Originally Posted by BB12 View Post
    Amazing thread and glad I came across it.

    Have some new ideas!

    Thanks
    Awsome glad you found something you could take from here BB12

  10. actually worked some of these in over the weekend..

    Very nice
    Formutech Nutrition | Online/Social Media Rep
    Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram for more promos!
    www.formutechnutrition.com |www.facebook.com/fnutrition

  11. Wow! Thank you for putting this together. I am saving it in my favorites folder.
    “I believe most people are essentially good. I know that I am. It's you I'm not entirely sure of.”
    ― Stephen King.

  12. ...
    Life is cold, short, and brutal
    Training log -
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/207211-sae2110s-training-log.html

  13. This should really be a sticky!
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