Body length and strength

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    Body length and strength


    Hi guys,

    I'm 1m83 and my training partner is 1m62. We both have more than 10years of gym experience.

    My opinion is that he has an advantage over me with the bench press and squats, due to his far shorter arms and legs. Only on those exercises does he come near my strength level.

    The ROM is greater in my case, but he keeps denying it.

    I'm looking for some math to point out who's right, since common sense won't do.

    Thx.

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    Yes, simple physics would explain why David Henry at 5 feet (sorry, im an American) can hammer curl 120s.

    Physics 101:
    Force (F) = Mass (M) x Acceleration (A)
    Work (W) = Force (F) x Distance (D) or W=FxD=MxAxD (Yes! Work makes you mad)

    The key here is distance. As your range of motion increases the distance you need to travel you have to put in more work. The Force is going to be the weight and the speed in which you do your squat. So, theoretically, if both of you are benching 225 at the same speed you're still required to put in MORE WORK giving the SAME FORCE to reach a FURTHER DISTANCE.

    It's also more taxing on your joints. Because they require more Torque (T) or "moment of force' which is the tendancy of force to rotate around an axis (your joints). If T= radius (r) X F in a simple sense then your still putting more torque since (as explained earlier) evein though r is equal F is greater for you.
    By believing passionately in something that still does not exist, we create it. The nonexistent is whatever we have not sufficiently desired.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrganicShadow View Post
    Yes, simple physics would explain why David Henry at 5 feet (sorry, im an American) can hammer curl 120s.

    Physics 101:
    Force (F) = Mass (M) x Acceleration (A)
    Work (W) = Force (F) x Distance (D) or W=FxD=MxAxD (Yes! Work makes you mad)

    The key here is distance. As your range of motion increases the distance you need to travel you have to put in more work. The Force is going to be the weight and the speed in which you do your squat. So, theoretically, if both of you are benching 225 at the same speed you're still required to put in MORE WORK giving the SAME FORCE to reach a FURTHER DISTANCE.

    It's also more taxing on your joints. Because they require more Torque (T) or "moment of force' which is the tendancy of force to rotate around an axis (your joints). If T= radius (r) X F in a simple sense then your still putting more torque since (as explained earlier) evein though r is equal F is greater for you.
    Thanks mate! Very good explanation.
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    Excellent explanation. I don't want what I'm about to state to be taken as a shot at the OP (or anyone who doesn't fit the description) but it should be known that the explanation our kind friend was so gracious in provided is not to be used as an excuse for NOT doing something. I'm so tired of hearing people create excuses instead of results. The age-old "I'm an ectomorph/hard gainer" excuse is another that grinds my freaking gears.

    Yes, there are always obstacles whether it be body type, time constraints, and virtually anything else you can think of. It's a part of life and growing up: facing obstacles and overcoming them.

    If you're insulted, you're probably one of the people I'm describing

    Ok. Rant over good thread topic, OP. The explanation was also very concise and easily understandable, Organic. Nice breakdown!
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    bench like a PLer and use a wide stance / low bar placement on your back. problem solved
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    Specific limb length will make a difference too. I have very long arms, a long torso, and short legs...which anthropometrically sets me up to be one hell of a dead lifter, a so so squatter, and one terrible bencher. These things will make a difference, as will rib cage size as well. Having a barrel chest will require a shorter ROM despite arm length.

    Br
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    Im starting to believe size of hands and feet even play a role in a persons ability to control heavier weights. I often struggle with deadlifts, shrugs, and certain dumbbell exercises becuase i have smaller hands. Physically I can handle the weight but my grip cant. Cant provide any science on that one though.

    Glad my explination was insightful.
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    Also fiber pinnation angle and insertion location (moment arm) can influence torque.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrganicShadow View Post
    Im starting to believe size of hands and feet even play a role in a persons ability to control heavier weights. I often struggle with deadlifts, shrugs, and certain dumbbell exercises becuase i have smaller hands. Physically I can handle the weight but my grip cant. Cant provide any science on that one though.

    Glad my explination was insightful.
    Foot and toe anthropometrics are correlated with sprinting success as well.
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