Does Nitric Oxide (NO) Supplements work?

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    Does Nitric Oxide (NO) Supplements work?


    Nitric oxide supplements are extremely popular pre-workout supplements. But does it work? Check this article:

    Does Nitric Oxide (NO) Supplements work?

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    Read the comments section of the article and you'll find that the author doesn't know what he is talking about and really doesn't seem to care whether the article is correct or not.
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    It is just a typo where NO was called an amino acid instead of arginine.
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    the article is a load of bollocks
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    Actually, the article is a very simply put summary of the research.

    There is little no peer reviewed research that shows NO supplements improve body composition. And only one that shows a slight increase in strength:

    Nutrition. 2006 Sep;22(9):872-81.

    Pharmacokinetics, safety, and effects on exercise performance of L-arginine alpha-ketoglutarate in trained adult men.
    Campbell B, Roberts M, Kerksick C, Wilborn C, Marcello B, Taylor L, Nassar E, Leutholtz B, Bowden R, Rasmussen C, Greenwood M, Kreider R.

    Exercise and Sport Nutrition Laboratory at the Center for Exercise, Nutrition, and Preventative Health Research, Department of Health, Human Performance, and Recreation, Baylor University, Waco, Texas, USA.

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of l-arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG) in trained adult men.

    METHODS: Subjects participated in two studies that employed a randomized, double-blind, controlled design. In study 1, 10 healthy men (30-50 y old) fasted for 8 h and then ingested 4 g of time-released or non-timed-released AAKG. Blood samples were taken for 8 h after AAKG ingestion to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of L-arginine. After 1 wk the alternative supplement was ingested. In study 2, which was placebo controlled, 35 resistance-trained adult men (30-50 y old) were randomly assigned to ingest 4 g of AAKG (three times a day, i.e., 12 g daily, n = 20) or placebo (n = 15). Participants performed 4 d of periodized resistance training per week for 8 wk. At 0, 4, and 8 wk of supplementation the following tests were performed: clinical blood markers, one repetition maximum bench press, isokinetic quadriceps muscle endurance, anaerobic power, aerobic capacity, total body water, body composition, and psychometric parameters tests. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance.

    RESULTS: In study 1, significant differences were observed in plasma arginine levels in subjects taking non-timed-release and timed-release AAKG. In study 2, significant differences were observed in the AAKG group (P < 0.05) for 1RM bench press, Wingate peak power, blood glucose, and plasma arginine. No significant differences were observed between groups in body composition, total body water, isokinetic quadriceps muscle endurance, or aerobic capacity.

    CONCLUSION: AAKG supplementation appeared to be safe and well tolerated, and positively influenced 1RM bench press and Wingate peak power performance. AAKG did not influence body composition or aerobic capacity.

    There was a really good review of NO supplementation and strength, hypertrophy, and power performance in the journal of strength and conditioning a few months ago...



    Nitric Oxide Supplements for Sports. pg. 14-20
    DOI: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3181bdaf89
    Bloomer, Richard J PhD, CSCS
    Article
    NITRIC OXIDE-STIMULATING DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS ARE ARGUABLY THE MOST WIDELY ADVERTIZED AND PROMOTED AGENTS IN THE SPORT/BODYBUILDING NUTRITION ARENA TODAY. UNFORTUNATELY, THESE PRODUCTS HAVE LITTLE SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE FOR EFFECT, DESPITE THE MASSIVE HYPE THAT SURROUNDS THE AGGRESSIVE ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. WHILE SOME ANECDOTAL REPORTS SUGGEST A POTENTIAL BENEFIT FROM USING THESE PRODUCTS, ONE CANNOT RULE OUT THE POSSIBILITY OF A "PLACEBO EFFECT." THE PURPOSE OF THIS REVIEW IS TO PRESENT INFORMATION RELATED TO THE ROLE OF NITRIC OXIDE IN SPORT PERFORMANCE AND TO PROVIDE AN OVERVIEW OF THE SCIENTIFIC RATIONALE FOR THE USE OF NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS AIMED AT INCREASING NITRIC OXIDE. (C) 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Association

    Here's the conclusion to the full text article of the abstract posted above.

    Nitric oxide–stimulating dietary supplements
    are widely available and
    aggressively marketed to the sports/
    bodybuilding community. Unfortunately,
    these products have little direct
    scientific evidence for effect and depend
    largely on borrowed science
    related to research done on isolated
    and intensified dosing of certain ingredients,
    in particular L-arginine. This,
    coupled with paid endorsements from
    top athletes, and a bit of the placebo
    effect thrown in for good measure,
    have catapulted this class of supplement
    to the top in the bodybuilding
    world.With the exception of one study
    (5), there exist no published scientific
    reports to indicate that the dietary
    supplements currently being marketed
    as ‘‘nitric oxide stimulators’’ have
    proven efficacy. Many research questions
    remain to be answered with
    regard to this class of dietary supplement,
    including GPLC. These include
    questions pertaining to whether such
    products can reliably (a) stimulate an
    increase in nitric oxide production, (b)
    stimulate an increase in blood flow, (c)
    stimulate an increase in nutrient and
    oxygen transport to exercising muscle,
    (d) improve exercise performance and
    recovery, and (e) increase muscle mass.
    Such claims are made routinely within
    the advertisements for such supplements.
    However, without welldesigned
    research studies focused on
    the actual product of sale, answers to
    such questions will remain unknown
    and this field will remain much more
    hype than effect.
    In fact, if you do a pub med search of "NO supplements exercise", aside from the first study, all the rest are done in clinical situations: ie, heart patients, etc. And from this and in vitro research, the supplement companies extrapolate the data and try to connect it to what would occur in a healthy, trained human.

    Thus NO supplementation, in my educated opinion, is a load of bullocks.

    Br
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    Arginine based products do jack, but GPLC has some solid data regarding NO production. Arginine for NO production is about as useful as glutamine.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    Arginine based products do jack, but GPLC has some solid data regarding NO production. Arginine for NO production is about as useful as glutamine.
    Right, but there doesn't seem (I have not seen) any strong relationship between NO production and protein synthesis.

    What would be interesting to see is if GPLC increases blood flow to a muscle during exercise beyond what is already occuring. You could use leg extensions as an exercise and measure via pleythosmography (sp?) to see if it makes a significant impact. Has this (or similar) been done that you know of?

    Br
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED View Post
    Right, but there doesn't seem (I have not seen) any strong relationship between NO production and protein synthesis.

    What would be interesting to see is if GPLC increases blood flow to a muscle during exercise beyond what is already occuring. You could use leg extensions as an exercise and measure via pleythosmography (sp?) to see if it makes a significant impact. Has this (or similar) been done that you know of?

    Br
    Not to my knowledge. The main scope of the GPLC studies were to see its efficacy on anaerobic threshold. They found the increased NO production in subsequent studies seeking some sort of MoA.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
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    Arginine based products do jack, but GPLC has some solid data regarding NO production. Arginine for NO production is about as useful as glutamine.
    I wouldn't call it solid data. They measured nitrate levels at 0 , 5 and 10 minutes and they found a significant difference! That probably will do jack for blood flow. As Br wrote, now combine that with resistance training where there is already blood flow and you probably get nothing.

    The sprint study was really weird. The people who took the least amount had the most improvement. The exact opposite results of their hypothesis. And no control group either.
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    Not sure where you guys have been doing your research, but i've read several newly released articles showing that NO supplements are effective, you just have to know what they actually do.

    No they aren't going to effect bodycomposition or strength, but thats not what NO does in the body, so why would you expect such results. NO also does not increase blood flow, and would not be beneficial anyways considering the flow of blood is a very complex mechanism that requires careful coordination between the heart and vasculature. An external mechanism speeding up the flow of blood would subsequently have to effect heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output etc..

    That being said, dietary nitrates and Arginine supplments have shown to decrease the oxygen cost of submaximal exercise, increase nitric oxide levels, improve the efficiency of muscle contractions, increase tolerance to high intensity exercise, and decrease blood pressure.

    According to recent literature NO supplmentation helps to improve endurance during exercise, which leads to better recovery between sets, increased exercise capacity. ALthough the research pertaining to resistance training is less than that of aerobic exercise.

    I'll get some studies posted up
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    Dietary nitrate supplementation enhances muscle contractile efficiency during knee-extensor exercise in humans

    1. Stephen J. Bailey1,
    2. Jonathan Fulford2,
    3. Anni Vanhatalo1,
    4. Paul G. Winyard2,
    5. Jamie R. Blackwell1,
    6. Fred J. DiMenna1,
    7. Daryl P. Wilkerson1,
    8. Nigel Benjamin2, and
    9. Andrew M. Jones1


    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanistic bases for the reported reduction in the O2 cost of exercise following short-term dietary nitrate (NO3−) supplementation. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, seven men (aged 19–38 yr) consumed 500 ml/day of either nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR, 5.1 mmol of NO3−/day) or placebo (PL, with negligible nitrate content) for 6 consecutive days, and completed a series of low-intensity and high-intensity “step” exercise tests on the last 3 days for the determination of the muscle metabolic (using 31P-MRS) and pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇o2) responses to exercise. On days 4–6, BR resulted in a significant increase in plasma [nitrite] (mean ± SE, PL 231 ± 76 vs. BR 547 ± 55 nM; P < 0.05). During low-intensity exercise, BR attenuated the reduction in muscle phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]; PL 8.1 ± 1.2 vs. BR 5.2 ± 0.8 mM; P < 0.05) and the increase in V̇o2 (PL 484 ± 41 vs. BR 362 ± 30 ml/min; P < 0.05). During high-intensity exercise, BR reduced the amplitudes of the [PCr] (PL 3.9 ± 1.1 vs. BR 1.6 ± 0.7 mM; P < 0.05) and V̇o2 (PL 209 ± 30 vs. BR 100 ± 26 ml/min; P < 0.05) slow components and improved time to exhaustion (PL 586 ± 80 vs. BR 734 ± 109 s; P < 0.01). The total ATP turnover rate was estimated to be less for both low-intensity (PL 296 ± 58 vs. BR 192 ± 38 μM/s; P < 0.05) and high-intensity (PL 607 ± 65 vs. BR 436 ± 43 μM/s; P < 0.05) exercise. Thus the reduced O2 cost of exercise following dietary NO3− supplementation appears to be due to a reduced ATP cost of muscle force production. The reduced muscle metabolic perturbation with NO3− supplementation allowed high-intensity exercise to be tolerated for a greater period of time.

    Acute l-arginine supplementation reduces the O2 cost of moderate-intensity exercise and enhances high-intensity exercise tolerance

    1. Stephen J. Bailey1,
    2. Paul G. Winyard2,
    3. Anni Vanhatalo1,
    4. Jamie R. Blackwell1,
    5. Fred J. DiMenna1,
    6. Daryl P. Wilkerson1, and
    7. Andrew M. Jones1

    + Author Affiliations

    1.
    1School of Sport and Health Sciences and
    2.
    2Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, St. Luke's Campus, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom

    1. Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: A. M. Jones, School of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Exeter, Heavitree Rd., Exeter EX1 2LU, UK (e-mail: a.m.jones@exeter.ac.uk).

    * Submitted 10 May 2010.
    * accepted in final form 17 August 2010.

    Abstract

    It has recently been reported that dietary nitrate (NO3−) supplementation, which increases plasma nitrite (NO2−) concentration, a biomarker of nitric oxide (NO) availability, improves exercise efficiency and exercise tolerance in healthy humans. We hypothesized that dietary supplementation with l-arginine, the substrate for NO synthase (NOS), would elicit similar responses. In a double-blind, crossover study, nine healthy men (aged 19–38 yr) consumed 500 ml of a beverage containing 6 g of l-arginine (Arg) or a placebo beverage (PL) and completed a series of “step” moderate- and severe-intensity exercise bouts 1 h after ingestion of the beverage. Plasma NO2− concentration was significantly greater in the Arg than the PL group (331 ± 198 vs. 159 ± 102 nM, P < 0.05) and systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced (123 ± 3 vs. 131 ± 5 mmHg, P < 0.01). The steady-state O2 uptake (V̇o2) during moderate-intensity exercise was reduced by 7% in the Arg group (1.48 ± 0.12 vs. 1.59 ± 0.14 l/min, P < 0.05). During severe-intensity exercise, the V̇o2 slow component amplitude was reduced (0.58 ± 0.23 and 0.76 ± 0.29 l/min in Arg and PL, respectively, P < 0.05) and the time to exhaustion was extended (707 ± 232 and 562 ± 145 s in Arg and PL, respectively, P < 0.05) following consumption of Arg. In conclusion, similar to the effects of increased dietary NO3− intake, elevating NO bioavailability through dietary l-Arg supplementation reduced the O2 cost of moderate-intensity exercise and blunted the V̇o2 slow component and extended the time to exhaustion during severe-intensity exercise.
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    Dietary nitrate supplementation reduces the O2 cost of low-intensity exercise and enhances tolerance to high-intensity exercise in humans

    1. Stephen J. Bailey1,
    2. Paul Winyard2,
    3. Anni Vanhatalo1,
    4. Jamie R. Blackwell1,
    5. Fred J. DiMenna1,
    6. Daryl P. Wilkerson1,
    7. Joanna Tarr2,
    8. Nigel Benjamin2, and
    9. Andrew M. Jones1

    + Author Affiliations

    1.
    1School of Sport and Health Sciences and
    2.
    2Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom

    1. Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: A. M. Jones Professor of Applied Physiology, Exeter Univ., Sport and Health Sciences, St. Luke's Campus, Heavitree Rd., Exeter, EX1 2LU UK (e-mail: a.m.jones@exeter.ac.uk).

    * Submitted 6 July 2009.
    * accepted in final form 3 August 2009.

    Abstract

    Pharmacological sodium nitrate supplementation has been reported to reduce the O2 cost of submaximal exercise in humans. In this study, we hypothesized that dietary supplementation with inorganic nitrate in the form of beetroot juice (BR) would reduce the O2 cost of submaximal exercise and enhance the tolerance to high-intensity exercise. In a double-blind, placebo (PL)-controlled, crossover study, eight men (aged 19–38 yr) consumed 500 ml/day of either BR (containing 11.2 ± 0.6 mM of nitrate) or blackcurrant cordial (as a PL, with negligible nitrate content) for 6 consecutive days and completed a series of “step” moderate-intensity and severe-intensity exercise tests on the last 3 days. On days 4–6, plasma nitrite concentration was significantly greater following dietary nitrate supplementation compared with PL (BR: 273 ± 44 vs. PL: 140 ± 50 nM; P < 0.05), and systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced (BR: 124 ± 2 vs. PL: 132 ± 5 mmHg; P < 0.01). During moderate exercise, nitrate supplementation reduced muscle fractional O2 extraction (as estimated using near-infrared spectroscopy). The gain of the increase in pulmonary O2 uptake following the onset of moderate exercise was reduced by 19% in the BR condition (BR: 8.6 ± 0.7 vs. PL: 10.8 ± 1.6 ml·min−1·W−1; P < 0.05). During severe exercise, the O2 uptake slow component was reduced (BR: 0.57 ± 0.20 vs. PL: 0.74 ± 0.24 l/min; P < 0.05), and the time-to-exhaustion was extended (BR: 675 ± 203 vs. PL: 583 ± 145 s; P < 0.05). The reduced O2 cost of exercise following increased dietary nitrate intake has important implications for our understanding of the factors that regulate mitochondrial respiration and muscle contractile energetics in humans.

    Acute and chronic effects of dietary nitrate supplementation on blood pressure and the physiological responses to moderate-intensity and incremental exercise

    1. Anni Vanhatalo1,
    2. Stephen J. Bailey1,
    3. Jamie R. Blackwell1,
    4. Fred J. DiMenna1,
    5. Toby G. Pavey2,
    6. Daryl P. Wilkerson1,
    7. Nigel Benjamin2,
    8. Paul G. Winyard2, and
    9. Andrew M. Jones1

    + Author Affiliations

    1.
    1School of Sport and Health Sciences and
    2.
    2Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, St. Luke's Campus, University of Exeter, Heavitree Road, Exeter, United Kingdom

    1. Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: A. M. Jones, School of Sport and Health Sciences, St. Luke's Campus, Univ. of Exeter, Heavitree Road, Exeter, EX1 2LU, UK (e-mail: a.m.jones@exeter.ac.uk).

    * Submitted 23 March 2010.
    * accepted in final form 4 August 2010.

    Abstract

    Dietary nitrate (NO3−) supplementation with beetroot juice (BR) over 4–6 days has been shown to reduce the O2 cost of submaximal exercise and to improve exercise tolerance. However, it is not known whether shorter (or longer) periods of supplementation have similar (or greater) effects. We therefore investigated the effects of acute and chronic NO3− supplementation on resting blood pressure (BP) and the physiological responses to moderate-intensity exercise and ramp incremental cycle exercise in eight healthy subjects. Following baseline tests, the subjects were assigned in a balanced crossover design to receive BR (0.5 l/day; 5.2 mmol of NO3−/day) and placebo (PL; 0.5 l/day low-calorie juice cordial) treatments. The exercise protocol (two moderate-intensity step tests followed by a ramp test) was repeated 2.5 h following first ingestion (0.5 liter) and after 5 and 15 days of BR and PL. Plasma nitrite concentration (baseline: 454 ± 81 nM) was significantly elevated (+39% at 2.5 h postingestion; +25% at 5 days; +46% at 15 days; P < 0.05) and systolic and diastolic BP (baseline: 127 ± 6 and 72 ± 5 mmHg, respectively) were reduced by ∼4% throughout the BR supplementation period (P < 0.05). Compared with PL, the steady-state V̇o2 during moderate exercise was reduced by ∼4% after 2.5 h and remained similarly reduced after 5 and 15 days of BR (P < 0.05). The ramp test peak power and the work rate at the gas exchange threshold (baseline: 322 ± 67 W and 89 ± 15 W, respectively) were elevated after 15 days of BR (331 ± 68 W and 105 ± 28 W; P < 0.05) but not PL (323 ± 68 W and 84 ± 18 W). These results indicate that dietary NO3− supplementation acutely reduces BP and the O2 cost of submaximal exercise and that these effects are maintained for at least 15 days if supplementation is continued.
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    That's why I said arginine based supplements are not effective. I never said that NO isn't a solid ergogenic.

    The one study you posted about arginine supplement is one that I have not seen before and would have to see the full text to really give an assessment.
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    Those studies contradict the I one I posted where no differences in muscular endurance or aerobic capacity were found in a 12 week longitudinal study.

    Nutrition. 2006 Sep;22(9):872-81.

    Pharmacokinetics, safety, and effects on exercise performance of L-arginine alpha-ketoglutarate in trained adult men.
    Campbell B, Roberts M, Kerksick C, Wilborn C, Marcello B, Taylor L, Nassar E, Leutholtz B, Bowden R, Rasmussen C, Greenwood M, Kreider R.

    Exercise and Sport Nutrition Laboratory at the Center for Exercise, Nutrition, and Preventative Health Research, Department of Health, Human Performance, and Recreation, Baylor University, Waco, Texas, USA.

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of l-arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG) in trained adult men.

    METHODS: Subjects participated in two studies that employed a randomized, double-blind, controlled design. In study 1, 10 healthy men (30-50 y old) fasted for 8 h and then ingested 4 g of time-released or non-timed-released AAKG. Blood samples were taken for 8 h after AAKG ingestion to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of L-arginine. After 1 wk the alternative supplement was ingested. In study 2, which was placebo controlled, 35 resistance-trained adult men (30-50 y old) were randomly assigned to ingest 4 g of AAKG (three times a day, i.e., 12 g daily, n = 20) or placebo (n = 15). Participants performed 4 d of periodized resistance training per week for 8 wk. At 0, 4, and 8 wk of supplementation the following tests were performed: clinical blood markers, one repetition maximum bench press, isokinetic quadriceps muscle endurance, anaerobic power, aerobic capacity, total body water, body composition, and psychometric parameters tests. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance.

    RESULTS: In study 1, significant differences were observed in plasma arginine levels in subjects taking non-timed-release and timed-release AAKG. In study 2, significant differences were observed in the AAKG group (P < 0.05) for 1RM bench press, Wingate peak power, blood glucose, and plasma arginine. No significant differences were observed between groups in body composition, total body water, isokinetic quadriceps muscle endurance, or aerobic capacity.

    CONCLUSION: AAKG supplementation appeared to be safe and well tolerated, and positively influenced 1RM bench press and Wingate peak power performance. AAKG did not influence body composition or aerobic capacity.
    While NO supplements may benefit aerobic performance, they are not marketed by the majority of the supplement industry as such. They are aggressively marketed as ergogenic aids of strength, power, and hypertrophy; however, they appear to have no significant impact upon such. Therefore, I think we need to educate, or at least make available the facts about NO supplements WRT strength and size to readers on this and other forums we belong to.

    Br
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    That's why I said arginine based supplements are not effective. I never said that NO isn't a solid ergogenic.

    The one study you posted about arginine supplement is one that I have not seen before and would have to see the full text to really give an assessment.

    Rodja, I can send you the study via email if you would like, it's a quality article. They used a dose of 6g of L-ARG which is obviously way higher than any supplement uses.

    ZIR- Yes I completely agree with you that the way NO supplements are marketed in this industry is total bullsh*t... but I believe that they do benefit certain aspects of resistance training involved with recovery between sets, muscle endurance, training intensity etc... You tend to see alot of comments about having better endurance with NO products.
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    Heres another recent article supporting L-ARG supplements

    EFFECTS OF ARGININE-BASED SUPPLEMENTS ON THE PHYSICAL WORKING CAPACITY AT THE FATIGUE THRESHOLD
    Clayton L Camic, Terry J Housh, Jorge M Zuniga, Russell C Hendrix, et al. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. Champaign: May 2010. Vol. 24, Iss. 5; pg. 1306, 7 pgs
    Abstract (Summary)

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of daily oral administration of arginine-based supplements for 4 weeks on the physical working capacity at the fatigue threshold (PWC^sub FT^). The PWC^sub FT^ test is an electromyographic (EMG) procedure for estimating the highest power output that can be maintained without neuromuscular evidence of fatigue. The study used a double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Fifty college-aged men (mean age ± SD = 23.9 ± 3.0) were randomized into 1 of 3 groups: (a) placebo (n = 19); (b) 1.5 g arginine (n = 14); or (c) 3.0 g arginine (n = 17). The placebo was microcrystalline cellulose. The 1.5-g arginine group ingested 1.5 g of arginine and 300 mg of grape seed extract, whereas the 3.0 g arginine group ingested 3.0 g of arginine and 300 mg of grape seed extract. All subjects performed an incremental test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer to determine their PWC^sub FT^ before supplementation (PRE) and after 4 weeks of supplementation (POST). Surface EMG signals were recorded from the vastus lateralis using a bipolar electrode arrangement during the incremental tests for the determination of the PRE and POST supplementation PWC^sub FT^ values. There were significant mean increases (PRE to POST) in PWC^sub FT^ for the 1.5 g (22.4%) and 3.0 g (18.8%) supplement groups, but no change for the placebo group (-1.6%). These findings supported the use of arginine-based supplements, at the dosages examined in the present investigation, as an ergogenic aid for untrained individuals. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
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    One major, major problem here:

    Quote Originally Posted by Movin_weight View Post
    Heres another recent article supporting L-ARG supplements

    EFFECTS OF ARGININE-BASED SUPPLEMENTS ON THE PHYSICAL WORKING CAPACITY AT THE FATIGUE THRESHOLD
    Clayton L Camic, Terry J Housh, Jorge M Zuniga, Russell C Hendrix, et al. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. Champaign: May 2010. Vol. 24, Iss. 5; pg. 1306, 7 pgs
    Abstract (Summary)

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of daily oral administration of arginine-based supplements for 4 weeks on the physical working capacity at the fatigue threshold (PWC^sub FT^). The PWC^sub FT^ test is an electromyographic (EMG) procedure for estimating the highest power output that can be maintained without neuromuscular evidence of fatigue. The study used a double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Fifty college-aged men (mean age ± SD = 23.9 ± 3.0) were randomized into 1 of 3 groups: (a) placebo (n = 19); (b) 1.5 g arginine (n = 14); or (c) 3.0 g arginine (n = 17). The placebo was microcrystalline cellulose. The 1.5-g arginine group ingested 1.5 g of arginine and 300 mg of grape seed extract, whereas the 3.0 g arginine group ingested 3.0 g of arginine and 300 mg of grape seed extract. All subjects performed an incremental test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer to determine their PWC^sub FT^ before supplementation (PRE) and after 4 weeks of supplementation (POST). Surface EMG signals were recorded from the vastus lateralis using a bipolar electrode arrangement during the incremental tests for the determination of the PRE and POST supplementation PWC^sub FT^ values. There were significant mean increases (PRE to POST) in PWC^sub FT^ for the 1.5 g (22.4%) and 3.0 g (18.8%) supplement groups, but no change for the placebo group (-1.6%). These findings supported the use of arginine-based supplements, at the dosages examined in the present investigation, as an ergogenic aid for untrained individuals. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
    It is really difficult to find good data out there in the supplement field because there really is no money in it. Generally speaking, we have to take what we can get.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
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    Yeah your right, there could be no effect in trained individuals because of the already acheived adaptations.

    But yeah, the issue is there is very little research on anything done with highly trained subjects... so it all has to be taken with a grain of salt

    I think we will see more and more research coming out in regards to these supplements though in the near future.
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    No they aren't going to effect bodycomposition or strength, but thats not what NO does in the body, so why would you expect such results. NO also does not increase blood flow, and would not be beneficial anyways considering the flow of blood is a very complex mechanism that requires careful coordination between the heart and vasculature. An external mechanism speeding up the flow of blood would subsequently have to effect heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output etc..
    The primary mechanism of NO is increased vasodilation and hence increased blood flow. The effect of increased exercise tolerance and o2 cost is speculated to be due to some direct mitochondrial/contractile mechanism and increased o2 supply.

    The studies you posted used beet root juice to cause an increase in NO. It seems like there is a different mechanism to generate NO besides the arginine one and the beet root juice and sodium nitrate works by this way. I guess you won't see too many companies promoting the beet root juice.

    And almost most studies which used PURE arginine failed to show an increase in NO. The studies which did show an increase are either supplemental ones which contains other ingredients or mix of arginine and other products (grape seed extract and such).

    Anyone wanna try beetroot juice before training?
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    Quote Originally Posted by anoopbal View Post
    The primary mechanism of NO is increased vasodilation and hence increased blood flow. The effect of increased exercise tolerance and o2 cost is speculated to be due to some direct mitochondrial/contractile mechanism and increased o2 supply.

    The studies you posted used beet root juice to cause an increase in NO. It seems like there is a different mechanism to generate NO besides the arginine one and the beet root juice and sodium nitrate works by this way. I guess you won't see too many companies promoting the beet root juice.

    And almost most studies which used PURE arginine failed to show an increase in NO. The studies which did show an increase are either supplemental ones which contains other ingredients or mix of arginine and other products (grape seed extract and such).


    Anyone wanna try beetroot juice before training?

    My point was no studies have shown supplements that increase NO such as nitrates from beet juice or Arginine, have shown increases in actual blood flow. Vasodilation in various vessels does not mean increases blood flow to muscle tissue. Vasodilation is just a mechanism to control the pressure gradient in blood vessels, if you just dilate all vessels the pressure would drop dramatically and we would pass out.
    Beetroot juice is simply a very nitrate concentrated vegetable, and you are about to see many companies use nitrates in there supplements bc of the articles I posted. Creatine nitrate is one of them

    The mechanism that these supplements enhance performance is still uncertain
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    Vasodilation in various vessels does not mean increases blood flow to muscle tissue. Vasodilation is just a mechanism to control the pressure gradient in blood vessels, if you just dilate all vessels the pressure would drop dramatically and we would pass out.
    If a blood vessel dilates whether in muscle or not, it will increase blood flow (lowering the peripheral resistance to flow). If exercise, the dilation and blood flow might be saturated that an increased NO might not have an effect. There are studies which shows both though.

    This is another reason why it is good to eat fruits & vegetables. Good studies! I hope people would try to eat more fuits and than vegetables than run after a supplement.
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    i do not know nothing about any of this study stuff yall are talking about and dont care to.but i do know i have used no products that helped me. along with a good diet and hardcore working out with weights that they work for me to make me look and feel super freaky pumped and vascular and seem to lean me out a liittle.and yes if i did not have a lot of money i probally would not buy no products.but because i can afford to add them to my staple of subs and i and many other people like the affects that no give me in the gym and in the bed room. just my 2 cents but thats not much hahah.
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    The pump and stimulant effects probably has more to do with the looong list of other ingredients that NO explode has than arginine. And you can get the same effects with other stuff which has no arginine in it too.
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    My favorite supplement that you don't NO is grammar.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sluggy View Post
    My favorite supplement that you don't NO is grammar.
    I agree that my grammar is pretty bad and I don't really care about it in a forum post. But I do need to work on it.

    And looking at all your posts here about this and that supplement. My favorite supplement that you don't NO is common sense (CS ®)
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    come on guys why do people think they can be jerks behing a keyboard lets get back on topic.for the people that like using no 2 products what are some of the best for geting you super pumped and vascular.thanks
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