Squatting

  1. Squatting


    does anyone know how a belt keeps you from getting a hernia during sqauts or if that's even the case?


  2. well supposedly, a belt facilitates for one to maintain a straight and stiff back when squatting. With squatting, form is mission critical... my bro damaged his back from trying to push the last rep and as a result, sacrificing his form....

    I don't know how effective a belt is though. I've only used a belt once, and never again because it was uncomfortable.

  3. A belt definitely helps keep you core tight and back in a stronger position. I get the feeling you are still learning about training at this point. As stated above, no matter what, form is always more important than amount of weight. As you learn to lift, make sure you learn correct form with lighter weights. Especially in squats. Learn the lifts and get stronger without the belt first. Alot of newbies wear a belt all the time, and don't learn how to properly stabilize themselves for the lifts.

    Since we are talking squats, if you ar just starting out, don't do sets lower than 10 for a while. And a rep is down at least to parallel, not lower. If you can't get to parallel, then drop some weight. Even as you get stronger and are doing lower rep sets with higher weight, they should go at least to parallel. Then a belt would be a good idea if you do sets lower than 5 reps or so. A belt does have it's place if you want to learn to lift heavy weight. If that's not your goal, and you are just athletic and lift in 6-10 range, you might not need one
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  4. Using a belt will actually inhibit the strengthening of your core. Volcom is actually experiencing this exact thing right now in his log - training to overcome the dependence he developed on his belt for core stability.

    It sucks when you can squat 400 with a belt, but take it off and your abs can't handle half that...

  5. Quote Originally Posted by Resolve View Post
    Using a belt will actually inhibit the strengthening of your core. Volcom is actually experiencing this exact thing right now in his log - training to overcome the dependence he developed on his belt for core stability.

    It sucks when you can squat 400 with a belt, but take it off and your abs can't handle half that...
    which is why its important to figureout howmuch weight and then add a belt your body can handle

    i know for sure when i dont wear a belt and do something when i normally wear one huge difference but not always diff amount of reps

    i use one of the best biggest belts on market, Inzer lever belt.. hardcore heavy expensive and hurts, always cuts or leaves bruises on me i know its working haha

  6. I just don't wear one, makes it simple

  7. For me, box squats got my form going in the right direction. Done properly, it forces you to stay back on your heels. Zercher squats work as well. I don't use a belt either.
    Always open light. Itís not what you open with, itís what you finish with. Louie Simmons

  8. I don't know that wearing a belt will prevent a hernia.
    Belts are fine and won't inhibit your strength if used appropriately. They will help you lift a little more. Simply work up as heavy as you can without a belt and then put the belt on and do a heavier set. As you get stronger over time, work up higher before you add the belt. Also make sure you are doing some separate ab and low back work.

  9. belts are ONLY for trunk-loading, structural exercises done near maximum weight, i'm talking 95-100% of max.

    1) if you're using a belt when doing your 5-12 rep range squats you're only setting yourself up for disaster by getting your core used to not having to do most of the work.

    2) a big reason for a belt is to prevent back hyperextension... to do this it has to be worn VERY tightly. if you are walking around the gym wearing a belt throughout your entire routine you are A) not wearing it correctly, and B) using it for all the wrong exercises, so you're C) COMPLETELY CLUELESS

    3) as stated above... belts are for trunk-loading, structural exercises involving possible hyperextension of the back at near maximal weight. what does this mean? olympic lifts. unless you are doing olympic style powerlifting e.g. clean and press, clean and jerk, hang clean, etc. etc.... you probably do not need a belt.

    I work as a personal trainer and am in the gym 6+ hrs each day. I honestly doubt if i've ever seen a single person ever wearing a belt for its intended use. so sad.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by time lord View Post
    belts are ONLY for trunk-loading, structural exercises done near maximum weight, i'm talking 95-100% of max.

    1) if you're using a belt when doing your 5-12 rep range squats you're only setting yourself up for disaster by getting your core used to not having to do most of the work.

    2) a big reason for a belt is to prevent back hyperextension... to do this it has to be worn VERY tightly. if you are walking around the gym wearing a belt throughout your entire routine you are A) not wearing it correctly, and B) using it for all the wrong exercises, so you're C) COMPLETELY CLUELESS

    3) as stated above... belts are for trunk-loading, structural exercises involving possible hyperextension of the back at near maximal weight. what does this mean? olympic lifts. unless you are doing olympic style powerlifting e.g. clean and press, clean and jerk, hang clean, etc. etc.... you probably do not need a belt.

    I work as a personal trainer and am in the gym 6+ hrs each day. I honestly doubt if i've ever seen a single person ever wearing a belt for its intended use. so sad.
    So why is it that my guts and not the abs are straining when i do heavier squats. my legs don't get tired (i can do more than 10 at or below parallel) but it really feels like something WILL definitely go wrong if i go any heavier. I can leg press 3x what i squat without a belt or any strain in the stomach. Is this normal?

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Sporter View Post
    So why is it that my guts and not the abs are straining when i do heavier squats. my legs don't get tired (i can do more than 10 at or below parallel) but it really feels like something WILL definitely go wrong if i go any heavier. I can leg press 3x what i squat without a belt or any strain in the stomach. Is this normal?
    No matter what, if you can squat 10+ reps below parallel and your legs don't get tired, you need to adjust something in your form and technique. You should get someone at your gym to help you correct your execution. It sounds like you "focus" on pushing through your gut and not on pushing through your legs. Try lower weight. Maybe post a video of you doing a set so we can see how it looks.

  12. good idea but since i don't have a camera yet maybe someone could upload someone squatting with proper technique.
  

  
 

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