Interval Training.... YES!!!!!!!! - AnabolicMinds.com

Interval Training.... YES!!!!!!!!

  1. keeper
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    Interval Training.... YES!!!!!!!!


    I HAVE GOT to give big props to HIIT. I'm in my 4th week and really loving it. No more dreaded, boring cardio work. But here's the kicker. When I began weight training in Feb, my body fat was at 21%. Late March, it was just over 19%. Today it is 15.24%! Weight training has done a lot for me (I am hooked) but I highly recommend HIIT for fat burning. Remember to vary the forms of interval training exercise. That's hard for me b/c I prefer running, but I've switched to jumping rope this week.

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    I agree i lost 16lbs doing hiit, most of it came off my stomach which was awesome. I also started with running then did elliptical and bike. I've also added in plyometrics (from the p90x videos) which is basically hiit exercise, 1 minute jumping around a few seconds off.

    Awesome job on the bf% drop keep it up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by keeper View Post
    I HAVE GOT to give big props to HIIT. I'm in my forth week and really loving it. No more dreaded, boring cardio work. But here's the kicker. When I began weight training in Feb, my body fat was at 21%. Late March, it was 19%. Today it is 15.24%! Weight training has done a lot for me (I am hooked) but I highly recommend HIIT for fat burning. Remember to vary the forms of interval training exercise. That's hard for me b/c I prefer running, but I've switched to jumping rope this week.
    A good weight lifting routine with some extra HIIT added to it is amazing for fat loss! I'm glad that you have had such great results from it!
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    HIIT and plyometrics are great! plyos have so many benefits for any athlete it's not even funny.. everyone should do them!

    you can also shake up volume days in the gym by treating them as one big HIIT exercise - set time periods in which to push out the maximum possible reps, set rest period.. repeat until your entire workout is done in 15 mins and collapse (preferably on a nice gym mat somewhere)

    great for explosiveness and attacking those type-2s!
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    there was some study done recently (i don't have the link for it), but it was cardio vs HIIT. after a month, the cardio group burned 17k more calories (on average) but the HIIT group lost 2% more body fat than the cardio group (on average). i found that rather interesting. no data in the article on what body fat ranges either group had.
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    I don't know about actual weight loss, b/c I've not been trying to lose, but I can sure say that HIIT is amazing for fat loss. I have noticed that getting my heart rate back down is faster now than when I started, enabling me to get in more peaks and valleys. I've gone from 5-6 intervals to 8-9 during my 20 min session, after warmup. I'm guessing the faster recovery is an indication of improved cardio function.
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    Quote Originally Posted by keeper View Post
    I don't know about actual weight loss, b/c I've not been trying to lose, but I can sure say that HIIT is amazing for fat loss. I have noticed that getting my heart rate back down is faster now than when I started, enabling me to get in more peaks and valleys. I've gone from 5-6 intervals to 8-9 during my 20 min session, after warmup. I'm guessing the faster recovery is an indication of improved cardio function.
    Absolutely! Your endurance has gone up as you have gotten into better shape and as your body has become more accustomed to HIIT.
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    what exactly is your routine?
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    *5 min warm up at moderate walking pace.
    *Increase activity level (sprint like a lion is chasing you) to take heart rate to max as quickly as
    possible and hold there for 30 seconds, then back off to near nothing to slow heart rate back to
    near resting level as quickly as possible.
    *Repeat this cycle for as many intervals as possible for 15 minutes.

    You must vary the form of exercise every 3-4 weeks. Running and biking are rated most
    efficient, but I hate the bike. I am alternating running and jumping rope. Elyptical machine is
    another option.

    It's recommended only 3 times a week as an alternative to conventional steady rate cardio. No more than 20 minutes, including warm-up. I'm a believer.
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    wow.. good work.
    now i'm gonna definitely incorporate HIIT into my 3 days a week weightlifting.. prob do 2 days of HIIT.

    btw, how did you measure your bf?... did u estimate using pics, use callipers or ____ ?
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoyFromAus View Post
    wow.. good work.
    now i'm gonna definitely incorporate HIIT into my 3 days a week weightlifting.. prob do 2 days of HIIT.

    btw, how did you measure your bf?... did u estimate using pics, use callipers or ____ ?
    The nutritionist at my gym measured me using the 7 point caliper method. When she did it this week and showed me the calculation on her computer screen, I thought she'd messed up and asked her to re-measure. She did and it was the same. I knew it would be improved, but I was shocked by how much.
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    Well, I haven't been doing HIIT for quite a while now. All this talk about it has got me wanting to do it again! So, today I'll be starting back up.
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    Would it be possible to have a good link or two shot out in which HIIT is laid out and explained? That would be fantastic!
  14. keeper
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    Here's an email I got that's fairly comprenhsive:

    High-Intensity Interval Training

    High-Intensity Interval Training is a workout strategy that is intended to increase performance with shorter training sessions. High-Intensity Interval Training, or HIIT, is one of the best methods for muscle retention and fat loss. Studies have shown that long endurance activities such as aerobics cause the breakdown of muscle tissue, which is why HIIT should be emphasized. HIIT and interval training are very similar and the only difference between them is the intensity in which they are done. Interval training is a varying of intensities within a workout, where you add a low-intensity session with a high-intensity session.

    You can perform your interval training in many ways, and you should also use variety. It can be performed on a stairmaster, mountain bike, local track, or a stationary bike. As with all methods of exercise, you should rotate the type of exercise performed to keep your body from adapting. If you desire longer-lasting results, cardiovascular work should be a priority on your fitness to-do list. Your main emphasis in exercise should be for cardio health, strength-training, and for flexibility. As with most cardio exercise, you should track your heart rate, distance, intensity, length, target heart rate, calories burned, and cool-down time.

    One of the great things about HIIT is that it can be applied to other activities as well. Running stairs, riding a stationary bike, a stair-stepper, or any activity where you can shift from high intensity to low intensity will work wonders. Let`s say that you`re going to add HIIT to running sprints or steps. Start working in intervals! Jog for a certain amount of time, sprint for a certain amount of time, followed by a short jogging session, and keep repeating a certain sequence until your time is finished.

    We`ve always been told that low-intensity aerobic exercise is the best method for ridding the body of unwanted fat. However, new research proves this opinion to be false. The reason that this low-intensity opinion of cardio exercise came about is a study that showed that lower intensity cardio burns a greater percentage of calories from as opposed to carbs. In research, HIIT has been shown to burn fat 50% more effectively that that of lower-intensity exercise. HIIT speeds your metabolism and keeps it running at a fast rate for up to sixteen hour after your workout. The bottom line is that HIIT burns a higher number of calories than that of lower-intensity.

    If you are looking to burn fat quickly, HIIT is the way to go. However, not everyone`s responds properly to this method. Diabetics whose body already has problems managing carbs should not train with HIIT. Other people who have just started a workout program should start with low-intensity and slowly start incorporating intervals as they get more advanced. The demands of HIIT can only be used by experienced trainees because newbies will simply give up after the first day of hard work. Take things one day at a time and the results will be experienced at a later time.

    Making Your Cardio Fun

    Being bored is not fun and it`s even worse when you know that you have another thirty minutes left on the treadmill. The minutes seem to go by like seconds and you hit the stop button because you simply cannot go on any longer. So what happened? Why does the cardio have to be so boring? This article is going to give you alternatives to the good ole treadmill and hopefully give you enough inspiration to finish your workout.
    The first alternative to simple cardio is by the use of workout videos. Workout videos are perfect for those who don`t have a gym membership and are acceptable because of their workout in your own living room. Workout videos are also perfect for motivation because the instructor pushes you all the way to completion. Another benefit of having this instructor on your TV is that you get expert guidance in helping you achieve your goals.

    Another great alternative to cardio is by the use of a jump rope. The cardio benefits of jumping rope are tremendous because of its calorie burning effect in such a short amount of time. Jump roping can burn up to 1,000 calories per hour, making it one of the most effecient workouts possible. Jump roping is fun, easy to learn, inexpensive, great for kids, portable, and in my opinion, the best way to make your cardio workout fun.

    Heavy bag training is not just for boxers anymore. On top of the great cardio workout that you are getting, heavy bag training also improves your self-defense skills. Heavy bag training also reduces stress, works your muscles, and helps improve hand-eye-coordination. Fitness manufacturers continue to develop new products aimed towards the fighting athlete. As new products are being developed, old training equipment such as the heavy bag are often forgotten.

    Now that you`ve learned three great alternatives to dull cardio routines, you should now be able to achieve your fat loss goals much easier. Don`t over-do your cardio and never go over an hour of continuous work due to chances of overtraining. Take things one day at a time and reap the benefits at a later time. Until next time, later!
  15. keeper
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    And this is a neat take on it:

    Guerrilla Cardio: Your most powerful weapon for fighting fat.
    Here’s the problem: You can
    develop the best darn set of abs this
    side of the big river; but if they’re all
    covered up by fat, what’s to show off?
    Nothing but a big fat belly, that’s what.
    Here’s the solution: Wage war on that
    ornery abdominal fat with Guerrilla
    Cardio. It’ll “free” your dear abbies
    from that prison cell of cellulite faster
    than any other cardio program ever
    developed.
    “So just what is Guerrilla Cardio?”
    you ask. Well, it’s an eight-week, mil-itant
    aerobics alternative specifically
    designed for folks short on time and
    “fed up” with abdominal fat—or just
    plain body fat in general. The premise
    is simple: Rather than waste half your
    day lazily plodding along in the so-called
    “fat-burning zone” on the
    Lifecycle or treadmill, hoping the fat
    melts off before you die of boredom,
    you radically pick up the pace and
    alternate bouts of 20-second maxi-mum-
    effort sprinting with 10-second
    periods of rest. You do eight of these
    gut-busting intervals. And all told,
    excluding the warm-up and cool-down,
    it’ll take you only four short
    minutes a day, three days a week. Yep,
    you read right … FOUR lousy minutes
    a day, THREE days a week. That’s it!
    “C’mon, four minutes!?” you say,
    incredulous as Arnold Schwarzen-egger
    watching an infomercial for the
    Ab Slide. “Bull——!”
    I know, I know … in an age when
    we’re bombarded by suspect quick-fix
    fat-loss strategies—if you can even
    call things like thigh creams, “fat-blockers”
    and prescription diet pills in
    and of themselves “strategies” for los-ing
    fat—what I’m proposing is indeed
    enough to sound most people’s “BS”
    alarm. I mean, four minutes of cardio
    a day for ridding yourself of all your
    superfluous flesh? It does have a ring
    of those “hypish” infomercials for all
    different kinds of ab-training devices—
    you know, the ones that work so well
    you only have to use them three min-utes
    a day, and you’ll miraculously
    develop rock-hard abs! Right.
    The Guerrilla Cardio program, how-ever,
    is different. It’s not a gimmick. It’s
    not based on blind guesswork or
    hype. It’s a real solution based on sci-entific
    research as well as real-world
    experience. In fact, according to
    Japanese researchers, it may be one
    of the best possible training plans ever
    developed.
    4,5
    Here’s the deal …
    Building a better fat-burning program
    Recently, Dr. Izumi Tabata, Ph.D., and
    colleagues from the National Institute
    of Health & Nutrition in Tokyo, Japan,
    set out in search of “the ideal” aerobics
    training protocol—one that would most
    efficiently increase fat burning and car-diovascular
    fitness. Such a plan, the
    researchers believed, should be:
    High intensity. For years, we’ve
    been told that low-effort aerobics is
    the best method for burning fat. New
    research tells another story. While
    studies show high-intensity aerobics
    may burn a little less fat than its low-intensity
    counterpart during the time
    actually spent exercising, the total
    expenditure of calories (and fat!) is up
    to 50 percent greater with intense car-dio.
    3
    You see, most of the fat you burn
    with high-intensity cardio occurs after
    exercising, not during the workout
    itself. Research presented in the jour-nal
    Medicine and Science in Sports
    and Exercise shows that when you
    work out using high-intensity inter-vals,
    the total amount of calories your
    body burns is elevated up to 142 per-
    measure of aerobic fitness. As exercise
    intensity increases beyond your VO2
    peak, your body shifts to anaerobic
    (without oxygen) energy production. In
    the face of this oxygen debt, lactic acid
    levels build up in tissues, making your
    muscles feel sore. Your ability to con-tinue
    exercising at this point is called
    anaerobic capacity. Notice that athletes
    in sports where a high level of both aer-obic
    and anaerobic fitness are neces-sary
    (wrestling, basketball, boxing,
    speed skating, etc.) are some of the
    leanest, most muscular individuals
    around. Unfortunately, with most of the
    cardio programs offered up today, it’s a
    case of “either/or.” You either maxi-mally
    stress your aerobic system (like
    most slow-go cardio programs) or max-imally
    stress your anaerobic system
    (like most high-intensity cardio pro-grams
    with long rest periods). So
    clearly, a cardio program that maximally
    improves both aerobic and anaerobic
    capacity would be a godsend.
    Brief. Too much aerobics burns
    muscle! And muscle not only helps
    you look leaner and stronger, it also
    makes your body more metabolically
    active. The ideal cardio program
    would be just long enough to “spark”
    your metabolism for that important
    post-exercise fat “burn” but not so
    long that it begins to eat away at your
    hard-earned muscle!
    In their search for the ideal cardio
    program, the Japanese researchers
    didn’t have to look far. Interestingly,
    just up the road, their countrymen on
    the National Speed Skating Team had
    been practicing a form of cardio fitting
    all of the above attributes for several
    years.
    2
    And using it with astonishing
    success, given their individual per-formances
    at the most recent Winter
    Olympics in Nagano, where Japanese
    skaters won gold in the men’s 500
    meters, bronze in the men’s 1,000
    meters and bronze in the women’s 500
    meters. More astonishing yet, per-haps,
    might be these athletes’ builds—
    cent more than low-effort aerobics
    within the hour after your workout.
    And it doesn’t stop there. Research
    published in the journal Metabolism
    shows this potent post-exercise
    “burn” may persist for up to 48 hours
    after exercising.
    1
    Fitness-promoting. The more fit you
    become, the more likely you are to use
    fat as fuel for any given activity. Peak fit-ness
    is generally defined as having both
    a high aerobic and anaerobic capacity.
    Your maximum oxygen capacity, or VO2
    peak, is generally considered the bestmuscular, powerful with hardly an
    ounce of fat to show for … we’re talk-ing
    body-fat percentages in the low- to
    mid-single digits. Freaky lean, almost.
    By now, you can probably guess
    that this “secret” Japanese training
    protocol is similar to the one I intro-duced
    you to at the beginning of this
    article—eight intervals of 20-second
    maximum-effort sprinting intermixed
    with 10-second periods of rest. That’s
    right, four minutes total, excluding the
    warm-up and cool-down. Intense …
    fitness-promoting … short … and, as
    you’ll come to discover, not so sweet.
    Putting Guerrilla Cardio to the test
    “… 8 very hard 20-second intervals
    with 10-second rest periods may be
    one of the best possible training pro-tocols.”
    2
    —Izumi Tabata, Ph.D., National
    Institute of Health & Nutrition,
    Tokyo, Japan
    To test the effectiveness of this brief
    but brutally intense regimen, Dr.
    Tabata and colleagues pit it against a
    moderate-intensity endurance pro-gram
    commonly prescribed by advo-cates
    of the so-called “fat-burning
    zone.”
    4
    In the moderate-intensity group,
    subjects riding exercise cycles were
    asked to pedal at 70 percent of VO2
    peak for an hour a day, five days a
    week. VO2 peak and anaerobic capac-ity
    were measured before and after
    each training session for the duration
    of the six-week study.
    A second group also exercised five
    days per week—only, these folks
    weren’t afforded the luxury of pedal-ing
    along at such a leisurely pace.
    After a short warm-up, this group was
    made to carry out eight sets of 20-
    second maximum-intensity sprints on
    an exercise cycle (170 percent of VO2
    peak—were’ talkin’ intense, folks!)
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    for later..
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    This information on HIIT was very helpful. I’m looking forward to trying this out! Thank you. I am really looking to loose body fat. It doesn’t matter how much cardio I do, I can’t seem to get rid of the fat. Any other suggestions would be very helpful.
  18. keeper
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evans View Post
    This information on HIIT was very helpful. Iím looking forward to trying this out! Thank you. I am really looking to loose body fat. It doesnít matter how much cardio I do, I canít seem to get rid of the fat. Any other suggestions would be very helpful.
    I've been hooked on it since May, with the exception of 5 weeks that I had to take off due to a torn calf muscle. HIIT has continued to prove itself to me. It's my drug of choice when it comes to fat buring. Good luck to you.
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    i have heard of HIIT many times but i never did cardio until i read this which was about an hour ago and i just finished my first HIIT session i thought i was going to go into cardiac arrest! ;p i am eager to lean up ive been bulking for 2 years and i am ready to get shreded i plan to do this 4-5 times a week i will keep you guys posted im my progress
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    A critical part of the success of HIIT is to take a day off between sessions. I wanted to do it daily once I got a taste of the effectiveness. Though a few details varied in all my reading and research, there was one solid consistency throughout the sources. That was to take a day off between HIIT days. I make the off day a heavy compound lift day. Good luck to you.
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    ya today my legs were pretty sore and i decided to do an every other day schedule thanks!
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    great job Keeper you have came a long way. Keep up the good/hard work
    Team Orbit
  23. keeper
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    I missed this til just now. Thanks, bud. I appreciate your encouragement very much.
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    http://musclemedia.com/training/hiit_table.asp
    Just another variation and a NB. In the Tabata Protocol study, the participants did it 4 times a week and 1 day of steady state cardio. They also found that this type of training needed to be cycled every 3 weeks because it lost it's effectiveness. Then again, the level that these elite athletes were training at was FAR greater than most of us could hope to reach. If you shoot for the moon, even if you miss you'll still be among the stars.
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    werd! Im a big fan of fasted am HIIT.

    Been hitting it 2-3 days a week. Actually putting on some good quad size and definition.

    To balance things out, my leg days more targets hams/gluts.

    BTW, you can structure your weight lifting session to mimic HIIT by using giant sets in a fasted state.
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