Flax seed oil and cancer

  1. Registered User
    kranden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Age
    32
    Posts
    23
    Answers
    0

    Flax seed oil and cancer


    found this on Webmd.com. Besure to read the last paragraph...

    Question:
    I am confused as to the varied supplement recommendations of fish oil and flax seed oil. Do they accomplish the same benefits? What do you recommend?

    Answer:
    Yes, there is an important distinction to be made between fish oil and flax seed oil. I have recommended fish oil supplements for more than five years, i.e., good fats. Alexander Leaf, MD, who was the chief of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of the medical services at the Massachusetts General Hospital when I trained there, did much of the important research on the effects of fish oil on health. Dr. Leaf and I have been in discussions about this issue since 1982, and it is because of his work and that of others that I began recommending fish oil many years ago. Even the reversal diet I recommend is not fat free; it simply reduces the excessive fat.

    My recommendations differ for men and women:

    For Women:
    Flax seed oil, 2-3 grams/day (in refrigerated one-gram capsules); provides omega-3 fatty acids.
    or
    Fish oil, 2 grams/day (in refrigerated one-gram capsules, MaxEPA or equivalent); provides omega-3 fatty acids.

    For Men:
    Fish oil, 2 grams/day (in refrigerated one-gram capsules, MaxEPA or equivalent); provides omega-3 fatty acids.

    Research from Charles Myers, MD, at the University of Virginia Medical School in Charlottesville showed that flax seed oil causes a 300% increase in the growth of prostate cancer cells. He said, 'It is the most powerful stimulus we know of for prostate cancer cells.' Consequently, I do not recommend flax seed oil for men.

  2. Obese Member
    Alpha Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    935
    Answers
    0


    Originally posted by kranden
    Research from Charles Myers, MD, at the University of Virginia Medical School in Charlottesville showed that flax seed oil causes a 300% increase in the growth of prostate cancer cells. He said, 'It is the most powerful stimulus we know of for prostate cancer cells.' Consequently, I do not recommend flax seed oil for men.

    Sheeeet. I hope that is not true. I down flax by the gallon. Seems like these days there is a study or a Doc claiming that about anything can cause cancer. Although, definately worth some further research....
  3. Obese Member
    Alpha Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    935
    Answers
    0


    Ran a quick search and found a couple of studies to the contrary. The first shows a slight decrease in prostate cancer among rats who consumed 5% flax. The second study was performed with humans with prostate cancer. However, it is largely inconclusive and summarizes with the statement "These pilot data suggest that a flaxseed-supplemented, fat-restricted diet may affect prostate cancer biology and associated biomarkers. Further study is needed to determine the benefit of this dietary regimen as either a complementary or preventive therapy."


    Effect of flaxseed supplementation on prostatic carcinoma in transgenic mice.

    Lin X, Gingrich JR, Bao W, Li J, Haroon ZA, Demark-Wahnefried W.

    Division of Urologic Surgery, Department of Surgery, and Center for Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of flaxseed supplementation on prostatic neoplasia in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. METHODS: A total of 135 male TRAMP mice 5 to 6 weeks old were randomized to a control group (AIN-76A diet) or an experimental group (AIN-76A diet plus 5% flaxseed by weight). One half of the mice in each group were treated for 20 weeks and the remainder for 30 weeks. At autopsy, urogenital tissues (four prostatic lobes, seminal vesicles, and emptied bladder), lungs, lymph nodes, and grossly abnormal tissues were collected for histologic evaluation. RESULTS: Of the control mice, 100% developed prostate cancer versus 97% of the mice in the flaxseed group. The tumor/urogenital weight was 3.6 +/- 0.4 g in the controls versus 1.9 +/- 0.2 g in the flaxseed-treated mice (P = 0.0005). At 20 weeks, no significant difference in tumor grade was seen between the two groups; however, at 30 weeks, the flaxseed-treated mice had significantly less aggressive tumors than did the controls (P = 0.01). The prevalence of lung and lymph node metastases was 13% and 16%, respectively, in the control mice versus 5% and 12%, respectively, in the experimental group (difference not significant). After 20 weeks of treatment, cellular proliferation (Ki-67) differed significantly between the control and experimental groups (38.1 +/- 2.03 versus 26.2 +/- 2.03; P <0.0001), and the apoptotic index (deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling) was 1.45 +/- 0.14 versus 3.3 +/- 0.31 (P <0.0001). Similar differences were seen after 30 weeks of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A diet supplemented with 5% flaxseed inhibits the growth and development of prostate cancer in the TRAMP model.


    Pilot study of dietary fat restriction and flaxseed supplementation in men with prostate cancer before surgery: exploring the effects on hormonal levels, prostate-specific antigen, and histopathologic features.

    Demark-Wahnefried W, Price DT, Polascik TJ, Robertson CN, Anderson EE, Paulson DF, Walther PJ, Gannon M, Vollmer RT.

    Division of Urologic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

    OBJECTIVES: Dietary fat and fiber affect hormonal levels and may influence cancer progression. Flaxseed is a rich source of lignan and omega-3 fatty acids and may thwart prostate cancer. The potential effects of flaxseed may be enhanced with concomitant fat restriction. We undertook a pilot study to explore whether a flaxseed-supplemented, fat-restricted diet could affect the biomarkers of prostatic neoplasia. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with prostate cancer who were awaiting prostatectomy were instructed on a low-fat (20% of kilocalories or less), flaxseed-supplemented (30 g/day) diet. The baseline and follow-up levels of prostate-specific antigen, testosterone, free androgen index, and total serum cholesterol were determined. The tumors of diet-treated patients were compared with those of historic cases (matched by age, race, prostate-specific antigen level at diagnosis, and biopsy Gleason sum) with respect to apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase [TdT]-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling [TUNEL]) and proliferation (MIB-1). RESULTS: The average duration on the diet was 34 days (range 21 to 77), during which time significant decreases were observed in total serum cholesterol (201 +/- 39 mg/dL to 174 +/- 42 mg/dL), total testosterone (422 +/- 122 ng/dL to 360 +/- 128 ng/dL), and free androgen index (36.3% +/- 18.9% to 29.3% +/- 16.8%) (all P <0.05). The baseline and follow-up levels of prostate-specific antigen were 8.1 +/- 5.2 ng/mL and 8.5 +/- 7.7 ng/mL, respectively, for the entire sample (P = 0.58); however, among men with Gleason sums of 6 or less (n = 19), the PSA values were 7.1 +/- 3.9 ng/mL and 6.4 +/- 4.1 ng/mL (P = 0.10). The mean proliferation index was 7.4 +/- 7.8 for the historic controls versus 5.0 +/- 4.9 for the diet-treated patients (P = 0.05). The distribution of the apoptotic indexes differed significantly (P = 0.01) between groups, with most historic controls exhibiting TUNEL categorical scores of 0; diet-treated patients largely exhibited scores of 1. Both the proliferation rate and apoptosis were significantly associated with the number of days on the diet (P = 0.049 and P = 0.017, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: These pilot data suggest that a flaxseed-supplemented, fat-restricted diet may affect prostate cancer biology and associated biomarkers. Further study is needed to determine the benefit of this dietary regimen as either a complementary or preventive therapy.
    •   
       

  4. Registered User
    neurotic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    124
    Answers
    0


    flax oil cures cancer, any sort of cancer, even methastasis, so there's no ****ing way it can cause prostate cancer.
    I have seen studies showing 500mg of vitamin C produces leukemia, so many studies are just ****.
  5. Registered User
    nightop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    26
    Answers
    0


    First thing... WebMD should not be taken as an absolute reliable resource.

    Second thing...

    There is a big difference between flax seeds (whole or milled) and flax seed oil. The later contains next to no lignans, while the former is very high in lignans; even the 'high lignan' flax seed oil contains relatively very few lignans than flax seeds themselves, and those that are present in the oil, usually settle to the bottom and are not consumed. The lignans are usually the primary consideration when talking about flax seed products and their cancer prevention potentials.

    The Omega-3's found in both flax seeds and flax seed oil will be involved as well, naturally, as there are many health benefits to having a proper n-6:n-3 ratio (such as a 3:1 or 4:1, and most americans supposedly have more like a 20:1). But as far as I know, it is the phytochemical [lignans] that are primarily responsible.

    Flax seed lignans are believed to have mixed ER agonist/antagonist properties (not unlike the SERM nolvadex, although I have yet to see sufficient proof of this). Specifically, they are believed to have antagonistic properties in the breast.

    Now, if that [WebMD] person were to say that 'flax seeds' (as opposed to 'flax seed oil') increase the risk of prostate cancer, because their lignans have ER agonistic properties at the prostate (as we know that it is both androgens AND estrogens that play primary roles in prostate cancer and BPH), then he might have a leg to stand on. Although, if he has access to some literature showing the tissue specific properties of flax seed lignans, I would sure like to get my hands on it.

    But 'flax seed oil' is essentially only a source of Omega-3 fatty acids, and should not be considered a significant lignan source. So saying "...that flax seed oil causes a 300% increase in the growth of prostate cancer cells" [in vivo] seems very inaccurate and unlikely, unless those researchers are considering something I'm not.
    Last edited by nightop; 10-14-2003 at 03:29 PM.
  6. Registered User
    nightop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    26
    Answers
    0


    This is sort of irrelevant, but interesting. Nandi posted this on the AL board in an unrelated thread.

    Quote -- Nandi:

    "In prostate cancer cell lines, it is generally accepted that E2 can bind to certain mutant androgen receptors and initiate androgen responsive gene transcription. What is interesting is that in the presence of a specific coactivator, E2 can act as a ligand for the wild type AR. To quote from the study where this was discovered,

    "The discovery of this new pathway from E2 to AR-ARA70 for the activation of androgen target genes in human prostate may have some important implications. (i) It suggests that testosterone/DHT may not be the only ligands for AR, and E2 can be another natural ligand for AR, which plays an important role in the development of the male reproductive system."

    http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/95/10/5527"
    Last edited by nightop; 10-14-2003 at 03:28 PM.
  7. Banned
    Jedi Master's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    87
    Answers
    0


    Originally posted by kranden
    found this on Webmd.com. Besure to read the last paragraph...

    Question:
    I am confused as to the varied supplement recommendations of fish oil and flax seed oil. Do they accomplish the same benefits? What do you recommend?

    Answer:
    Yes, there is an important distinction to be made between fish oil and flax seed oil. I have recommended fish oil supplements for more than five years, i.e., good fats. Alexander Leaf, MD, who was the chief of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of the medical services at the Massachusetts General Hospital when I trained there, did much of the important research on the effects of fish oil on health. Dr. Leaf and I have been in discussions about this issue since 1982, and it is because of his work and that of others that I began recommending fish oil many years ago. Even the reversal diet I recommend is not fat free; it simply reduces the excessive fat.

    My recommendations differ for men and women:

    For Women:
    Flax seed oil, 2-3 grams/day (in refrigerated one-gram capsules); provides omega-3 fatty acids.
    or
    Fish oil, 2 grams/day (in refrigerated one-gram capsules, MaxEPA or equivalent); provides omega-3 fatty acids.

    For Men:
    Fish oil, 2 grams/day (in refrigerated one-gram capsules, MaxEPA or equivalent); provides omega-3 fatty acids.

    Research from Charles Myers, MD, at the University of Virginia Medical School in Charlottesville showed that flax seed oil causes a 300% increase in the growth of prostate cancer cells. He said, 'It is the most powerful stimulus we know of for prostate cancer cells.' Consequently, I do not recommend flax seed oil for men.
    In the above post Neal Barnard is quoted as saying, "Research from Charles Myers, MD, at the University of Virginia Medical School in Charlottesville showed that flax seed oil causes a 300% increase in the growth of prostate cancer cells."

    Then, Charles Myers, M.D. explains that what he "really" (my quotation marks) says is that a diet high in alpha linoleic acid (perhaps only alpha linoleic acid from red meat, nobody adequately addresses this) results in a 440% increase in risk of prostate cancer and that alpha linoleic acid (Charles Myers doesn't explain the source but I'm guessing meat because if the alpha linoleic acid was from flax he would definitely say that...given the timbre of this issue) is one of the most powerful growth stimuli for human prostate cancer cells (in a lab dish, I have to presume).

    The problems with these remarks are myriad.

    First, Dean Ornish is indulging in hyperbole at least and he's outright misrepresenting information at worst. Myers does not say flax seed oil causes a 300% increase in prostate cancer cell growth according to what I read. Cells in a dish in a lab onto which you've squirted something react differently than cells in a human being respond after that something has been eaten.

    Second, the bond angles in oils vary according to their source and oils have variant impact depending upon their bond angles. For example, the d-alpha tocopherol isomer of vitamin E is good for things that other isomers of vitamin E can't help.

    Dean Ornish needs to address this issues before recommending fish oil.

    Charles Myers only muddies the view. Was the alpha linoleic acid Myers used from an animal source? Why doesn't he address that? Have Dean or Charles considered that bond angles in a plant oil might be considerably different from bond angles in an oil of like carbon bonds & length but derived from the fat of an animal? Why not?
  8. Banned
    Jedi Master's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    87
    Answers
    0


    While flax seed is the richest plant-based source of omega fatty acids, there is one research report (enter flax in our search box) that indicates that flax seed oil may accelerate the growth of tumors of the prostate. It isn't known to cause prostate cancer, but since most men over 50 have some form of prostate cancer (although only a small percentage will develop into a life-threatening form), this should be considered when choosing the source of omegas.

    Dr. Ornish, whose program is vegetarian, makes an exception of fish oil for men to get their omega fatty acids.



    this and my above post was taken off another site, but I now am becoming worried, I take flax oil everyday.
  9. Registered User
    neurotic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    124
    Answers
    0


    Flax seed oil reduces all sorts of tumours and prostate isn't going to be an exception. There's no way flax oil promotes cancer.
  10. Registered User
    dr.mattdogg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Age
    32
    Posts
    54
    Answers
    0


    i dunno, flax seed oil does come from rapeseed and i heard something a while back about rapeseed being toxic and being carcinogenic
  11. Registered User
    neurotic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    124
    Answers
    0


    That's stupid. Flax oil is anti-carciogenic. In fact, flax oil has been used to cure cancer in a number of cases by Dr. Budwid, it's even been used to cure methastasized cancers.
  12. Registered User
    MadChild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    58
    Answers
    0


    Has anyone else come accross any more info on this? I just bought some flax oil for the first time on Saturday
  13. Registered User
    badbart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Age
    41
    Posts
    550
    Answers
    0


    This is why I don't take Flax any more.
  14. DDD
    DDD is offline
    Registered User
    DDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    22
    Answers
    0


    Flax oil does not cause or inflame prostate cancer or cause the proliferation of prostate cells. It actually does the opposite. The lignins found in flax oil have been proven by German scientists to reduce the proliferation of prostate cells.
    Here's how. The lignins from flax oil have a high binding affinity for SHBG. The prostate also has a very high binding affinity for SHBG. Proliferation of prostate cells is caused by excess DHT binding to the prostate or by excess estrogen binding to the prostate. DHT and Estrogen bind to the suface of the prostate by binding with the SHBG which is already bound to the prostate. Tying up all of the SHBG with the lignins from flax oil prevents the DHT and Estrogen from binding to the surface of the prostate. Understand? Now reach in that fridge and down that flax oil to your hearts content!!!
  15. Registered User
    MarcusG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,237
    Answers
    0


    The thing about flax oil is that its quite highly polyunsaturated and easily breaks down into free radicals into the body (as compared to mono and saturated fats). I'm sure there are good things like lignans which are beneficial but gulping down loads of flax oil is deleterious IMO.

    Also fish oil contains EFAs which do not need conversion like flax oil.

    See link for some useful info:
    http://www.uow.edu.au/arts/sts/sbede...ter3/ch3b.html
  16. DDD
    DDD is offline
    Registered User
    DDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    22
    Answers
    0


    Originally posted by MarcusG
    The thing about flax oil is that its quite highly polyunsaturated and easily breaks down into free radicals into the body (as compared to mono and saturated fats).
    That's news to me. Polyunsaturated fats are what you want in your diet aren't they??? That's common knowledge.
  17. Registered User
    MarcusG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,237
    Answers
    0


    No its a common myth. Saturated and mono is what you want and need. Do a google search on saturated +fat +myth.
  18. DDD
    DDD is offline
    Registered User
    DDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    22
    Answers
    0


    Originally posted by MarcusG
    No its a common myth. Saturated and mono is what you want and need. Do a google search on saturated +fat +myth.
    Ya O.K. I better go stock up on bacon, butter and and pork rinds.
  19. Registered User
    A-Train's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Age
    52
    Posts
    25
    Answers
    0


    Originally posted by dr.mattdogg
    i dunno, flax seed oil does come from rapeseed and i heard something a while back about rapeseed being toxic and being carcinogenic
    Actually, flax and rape are different plants.

    Canola Oil comes from rapeseed.

    Acrylamide is the toxic/carcinogenic culprit but, from what I've read, it's only an issue when the oil is heated to extreme temperatures.

    http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH...15/351729.html
  20. Registered User
    MarcusG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,237
    Answers
    0


    Since soybeans and corn are fed to cattle and hogs, the fat composition of these animals may be closer to polyunsaturated fat than you think.
  21. Registered User
    neurotic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    124
    Answers
    0


    The whole theory about Flax jeopardizing prostate health (whether or not there's a pre-existing carcinoma) doesn't hold. A quick search at PubMed and you get many entries showing the OPPOSITE effect.
    Here we have one of many examples:

    Effect of flaxseed supplementation on prostatic carcinoma in transgenic mice.

    Lin X, Gingrich JR, Bao W, Li J, Haroon ZA, Demark-Wahnefried W.

    Division of Urologic Surgery, Department of Surgery, and Center for Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of flaxseed supplementation on prostatic neoplasia in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. METHODS: A total of 135 male TRAMP mice 5 to 6 weeks old were randomized to a control group (AIN-76A diet) or an experimental group (AIN-76A diet plus 5% flaxseed by weight). One half of the mice in each group were treated for 20 weeks and the remainder for 30 weeks. At autopsy, urogenital tissues (four prostatic lobes, seminal vesicles, and emptied bladder), lungs, lymph nodes, and grossly abnormal tissues were collected for histologic evaluation. RESULTS: Of the control mice, 100% developed prostate cancer versus 97% of the mice in the flaxseed group. The tumor/urogenital weight was 3.6 +/- 0.4 g in the controls versus 1.9 +/- 0.2 g in the flaxseed-treated mice (P = 0.0005). At 20 weeks, no significant difference in tumor grade was seen between the two groups; however, at 30 weeks, the flaxseed-treated mice had significantly less aggressive tumors than did the controls (P = 0.01). The prevalence of lung and lymph node metastases was 13% and 16%, respectively, in the control mice versus 5% and 12%, respectively, in the experimental group (difference not significant). After 20 weeks of treatment, cellular proliferation (Ki-67) differed significantly between the control and experimental groups (38.1 +/- 2.03 versus 26.2 +/- 2.03; P <0.0001), and the apoptotic index (deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling) was 1.45 +/- 0.14 versus 3.3 +/- 0.31 (P <0.0001). Similar differences were seen after 30 weeks of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A diet supplemented with 5% flaxseed inhibits the growth and development of prostate cancer in the TRAMP model.

    PMID: 12429338 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
  22. Registered User
    Toneyfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Age
    32
    Posts
    38
    Answers
    0


    *downs another container of cottage cheese with flax oil*

    I think these so-called "findings" are nothing to be taken seriously. Give me some 100% valid proof that Flax Oil causes cancer, and i'll stop supplementing with it. But so far, I can say with confidence that it's given me nothing but benefits. *runs fingers through silky long hair*
  23. Registered User
    Craig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    18
    Answers
    0


    Canola oil is a type of Rapeseed oil. Flaxseed is not related to rapeseed.
  •   

      
     

Similar Forum Threads

  1. flax seed oil, fish oil and udo's fatty acid oil 3,6,9
    By alwaysgaining in forum Nutrition / Health
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-03-2008, 10:10 AM
  2. flax seed oil suggestions
    By mauibuilt in forum Supplements
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 04-28-2005, 07:20 AM
  3. Question, regarding Flax seed oil.....
    By bizzare_777 in forum Supplements
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-27-2005, 10:38 PM
  4. Fish (salmon) and flax seed oils? any sides?
    By Grifty McGrift in forum Supplements
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-15-2004, 12:10 PM
  5. flax seed oil
    By sage in forum Supplements
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 10-28-2002, 07:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in