sweet bell pepper

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    sweet bell pepper


    Articles citing this Article

    PubMed

    PubMed Citation
    Articles by Masuda, Y.
    Articles by Fushiki, T.

    Upregulation of uncoupling proteins by oral administration of capsiate, a nonpungent capsaicin analog
    Yoriko Masuda,1 Satoshi Haramizu,1 Kasumi Oki,1 Koichiro Ohnuki,1 Tatsuo Watanabe,2 Susumu Yazawa,3 Teruo Kawada,1 Shu-ichi Hashizume,4 and Tohru Fushiki1
    1Laboratory of Nutrition Chemistry, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, and 3Laboratory of Vegetable and Ornamental Horticulture, Division of Agriculture, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502; 2School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8526; and 4Research Institute, Morinaga and Company, Limited, Yokohama 230-8504, Japan

    Submitted 11 September 2002 ; accepted in final form 14 August 2003



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    Capsiate is a nonpungent capsaicin analog, a recently identified principle of the nonpungent red pepper cultivar CH-19 Sweet. In the present study, we report that 2-wk treatment of capsiate increased metabolic rate and promoted fat oxidation at rest, suggesting that capsiate may prevent obesity. To explain these effects, at least in part, we examined uncoupling proteins (UCPs) and thyroid hormones. UCPs and thyroid hormones play important roles in energy expenditure, the maintenance of body weight, and thermoregulation. Two-week treatment of capsiate increased the levels of UCP1 protein and mRNA in brown adipose tissue and UCP2 mRNA in white adipose tissue. This dose of capsiate did not change serum triiodothyronine or thyroxine levels. A single dose of capsiate temporarily raised both UCP1 mRNA in brown adipose tissue and UCP3 mRNA in skeletal muscle. These results suggest that UCP1 and UCP2 may contribute to the promotion of energy metabolism by capsiate, but that thyroid hormones do not.

    oxygen consumption; body fat; energy expenditure; CH-19 Sweet; thermogenesis---itabenice if one of our board sponcers could sell sweet bell pepper extract

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    Should just eat them, they're damn tasty. It just goes to show that there are so many good phytochemicals in veggies that play roles beyond what can ever imagine.

    BTW, isn't Capsiate in Venom?

    You know, that stuff that numbs your ****,

    Just kidding skull
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    I just checked, Red Pepper Extract (Capsiate) can be found in Venom Hyperdrive...
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    Quote Originally Posted by theshocker21
    I just checked, Red Pepper Extract (Capsiate) can be found in Venom Hyperdrive...
    ---
    shocker--- yes same as venom I realy like the product[exept for -yaknow]so I was trying to figure what did that---You have to be carefull not to use the wrong stuff it has to be sweet bell pepper not the hot red pepper the hot can mess you up [neurotoxic]------capsiate=sweet/capsicum=hot

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