Some studies on L-Carnitine L-Tartrate. Personally one of my favorite ingredients and it has the studies to back it up.

First off, safety concerns
Safety measures of L-carnitine L-tartrate supplementation in healthy men.
Safety measures of L-carnitine L-tartrate suppleme... [J Strength Cond Res. 2001] - PubMed result

Abstract

QUOTE
The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of ingestion of L-CARNIPURE (L-carnitine L-tartrate [LCLT]) on alterations in a complete blood cell profile and in circulating metabolic enzymes. Using a balanced, placebo (P), cross-over design (1 week washout), 10 healthy, active men volunteered and acted as their own control taking either a P or LCLT supplement (3 g.day(-1)) for 3 weeks. Postabsorptive morning blood samples were obtained both before and after 21 days of P and LCLT supplementation. Serum samples were analyzed for clinical chemistries including a complete chemistry panel with markers of liver and renal function along with various minerals and electrolytes. In addition, whole blood was analyzed for a complete blood count with differential. It was determined that there were no statistically significant differences between the LCLT and the placebo conditions for any of the variables examined. The results of this study suggest that LCLT, when used as a dietary supplement, has no adverse effects on metabolic and hematological safety variables in normally healthy men.




L-Carnitine L-tartrate supplementation favorably affects markers of recovery from exercise stress.
http://www.ncbi/.
nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11788381

Abstract

QUOTE
We examined the influence of L-carnitine L-tartrate (LCLT) on markers of purine catabolism, free radical formation, and muscle tissue disruption after squat exercise. With the use of a balanced, crossover design (1 wk washout), 10 resistance-trained men consumed a placebo or LCLT supplement (2 g L-carnitine/day) for 3 wk before obtaining blood samples on six consecutive days (D1 to D6). Blood was also sampled before and after a squat protocol (5 sets, 15-20 repetitions) on D2. Muscle tissue disruption at the midthigh was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before exercise and on D3 and D6. Exercise-induced increases in plasma markers of purine catabolism (hypoxanthine, xanthine oxidase, and serum uric acid) and circulating cytosolic proteins (myoglobin, fatty acid-binding protein, and creatine kinase) were significantly (P < or = 0.05) attenuated by LCLT. Exercise-induced increases in plasma malondialdehyde returned to resting values sooner during LCLT compared with placebo. The amount of muscle disruption from MRI scans during LCLT was 41-45% of the placebo area. These data indicate that LCLT supplementation is effective in assisting recovery from high-repetition squat exercise.




The effects of L-carnitine L-tartrate supplementation on hormonal responses to resistance exercise and recovery.
The effects of L-carnitine L-tartrate supplementat... [J Strength Cond Res. 2003] - PubMed result

Abstract

QUOTE
The purpose of this investigation was to examine the influence of L-carnitine L-tartrate (LCLT) supplementation using a balanced, cross-over, placebo-controlled research design on the anabolic hormone response (i.e., testosterone [T], insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 [IGFBP-3], and immunofunctional and immunoreactive growth hormone [GHif and GHir]) to acute resistance exercise. Ten healthy, recreationally weight-trained men (mean +/- SD age 23.7 +/- 2.3 years, weight 78.7 +/- 8.5 kg, and height 179.2 +/- 4.6 cm) volunteered and were matched, and after 3 weeks of supplementation (2 g LCLT per day), fasting morning blood samples were obtained on six consecutive days (D1-D6). Subjects performed a squat protocol (5 sets of 15-20 repetitions) on D2. During the squat protocol, blood samples were obtained before exercise and 0, 15, 30, 120, and 180 minutes postexercise. After a 1-week washout period, subjects consumed the other supplement for a 3-week period, and the same experimental protocol was repeated using the exact same procedures. Expected exercise-induced increases in all of the hormones were observed for GHir, GHif, IGFBP-3, and T. Over the recovery period, LCLT reduced the amount of exercise-induced muscle tissue damage, which was assessed via magnetic resonance imaging scans of the thigh. LCLT supplementation significantly (p < 0.05) increased IGFBP-3 concentrations prior to and at 30, 120, and 180 minutes after acute exercise. No other direct effects of LCLT supplementation were observed on the absolute concentrations of the hormones examined, but with more undamaged tissue, a greater number of intact receptors would be available for hormonal interactions. These data support the use of LCLT as a recovery supplement for hypoxic exercise and lend further insights into the hormonal mechanisms that may help to mediate quicker recovery.



Androgenic responses to resistance exercise: effects of feeding and L-carnitine.
Androgenic responses to resistance exercise: effec... [Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006] - PubMed result

Abstract

QUOTE
PURPOSE: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of 3 wk of L-carnitine L-tartrate (LCLT) supplementation and post-resistance-exercise (RE) feeding on hormonal and androgen receptor (AR) responses. METHODS: Ten resistance-trained men (mean+/-SD: age, 22+/-1 yr; mass, 86.3+/-15.3 kg; height, 181+/-11 cm) supplemented with LCLT (equivalent to 2 g of L-carnitine per day) or placebo (PL) for 21 d, provided muscle biopsies for AR determinations, then performed two RE protocols: one followed by water intake, and one followed by feeding (8 kcal.kg body mass, consisting of 56% carbohydrate, 16% protein, and 28% fat). RE protocols were randomized and included serial blood draws and a 1-h post-RE biopsy. After a 7-d washout period, subjects crossed over, and all experimental procedures were repeated. RESULTS: LCLT supplementation upregulated (P<0.05) preexercise AR content compared with PL (12.9+/-5.9 vs 11.2+/-4.0 au, respectively). RE increased (P<0.05) AR content compared with pre-RE values in the PL trial only. Post-RE feeding significantly increased AR content compared with baseline and water trials for both LCLT and PL. Serum total testosterone concentrations were suppressed (P<0.05) during feeding trials with respect to corresponding water and pre-RE values. Luteinizing hormone demonstrated subtle, yet significant changes in response to feeding and LCLT. CONCLUSION: In summary, these data demonstrated that: 1) feeding after RE increased AR content, which may result in increased testosterone uptake, and thus enhanced luteinizing hormone secretion via feedback mechanisms; and 2) LCLT supplementation upregulated AR content, which may promote recovery from RE.



Responses of criterion variables to different supplemental doses of L-carnitine L-tartrate.
Responses of criterion variables to different supp... [J Strength Cond Res. 2007] - PubMed result

Abstract

QUOTE
L-carnitine L-tartrate (LCLT) supplementation beneficially affects markers of postexercise metabolic stress and muscle damage. However, to date, no study has determined the dose response of LCLT to elicit such responses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different doses of LCLT on criterion variables previously shown to be responsive to LCLT supplementation. Eight healthy men (22 +/- 3 y, 174 +/- 5 cm, 83.0 +/- 15.3 kg) were supplemented with 0 g, 1 g, and 2 g of LCLT for 3 weeks and then performed a bout of resistance exercise (5 sets of 15-20 repetition maximum with a 2-min rest between sets) with associated blood draws. This procedure was performed in a balanced, randomized, repeated measures design. Serum carnitine concentrations increased (p < or = 0.05) following the 1 g and 2 g doses, with the 2-g dose providing the highest carnitine concentrations. The 1- and 2-g doses reduced postexercise serum hypoxanthine, serum xanthine oxidase, serum myoglobin, and perceived muscle soreness. In conclusion, both the 1- and 2-g doses were effective in mediating various markers of metabolic stress and of muscle soreness. Use of LCLT appears to attenuate metabolic stress and the hypoxic chain of events leading to muscle damage after exercise.



l-Carnitine l-tartrate supplementation favorably affects biochemical markers of recovery from physical exertion in middle-aged men and women.
l-Carnitine l-tartrate supplementation favorably a... [Metabolism. 2010] - PubMed result

Abstract

QUOTE
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Carnipure tartrate (Lonza, Allendale, NJ) supplementation (total dose of 2 g/d of l-carnitine) on markers of performance and recovery from physical exertion in middle-aged men and women. Normally active and healthy men (n = 9, 45.4 +/- 5.3 years old) and women (n = 9, 51.9 +/- 5.0 years old) volunteered to participate in the investigation. Double-blind, placebo, balanced treatment presentation and crossover design were used with 3 weeks and 3 days of supplementation followed by a 1-week washout period before the other counterbalanced treatment was initiated. After 3 weeks of each supplementation protocol, each participant then performed an acute resistance exercise challenge of 4 sets of 15 repetitions of squat/leg press at 50% 1-repetition maximum and continued supplementation over the recovery period that was evaluated. Blood samples were obtained at preexercise and at 0, 15, 30, and 120 minutes postexercise during the acute resistance exercise challenge and during 4 recovery days as well. Two grams of l-carnitine supplementation had positive effects and significantly (P </= .05) attenuated biochemical markers of purine metabolism (ie, hypoxanthine, xanthine oxidase), free radical formation (malondialdehyde), muscle tissue disruption (myoglobin, creatine kinase), and muscle soreness after physical exertion. However, markers of physical performance (ie, strength, power, get up and go) were not affected by supplementation. These findings support our previous findings of l-carnitine in younger people that such supplementation can reduce chemical damage to tissues after exercise and optimize the processes of muscle tissue repair and remodeling. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.