BCAAs raise T levels in Bodybuilders

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    BCAAs raise T levels in Bodybuilders


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    Another good one thanks Maxximal
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    Terrible study to show this. Athletes that had an intake of .8g/kg of bodyweight in protein or greater were excluded. For someone weighing 220lbs that would equate to 80g of protein a day or less. Yeah BCAA are going to help someone with that low of a total protein intake but for the people around here and anyone that takes their nutrition seriously, we get at least double that every day. More total protein means more BCAA through the whole food sources.

    I still think BCAA are a waste of money if you're eating a high meat and/or whey diet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearedbleedblue View Post
    Terrible study to show this. Athletes that had an intake of .8g/kg of bodyweight in protein or greater were excluded. For someone weighing 220lbs that would equate to 80g of protein a day or less. Yeah BCAA are going to help someone with that low of a total protein intake but for the people around here and anyone that takes their nutrition seriously, we get at least double that every day. More total protein means more BCAA through the whole food sources.

    I still think BCAA are a waste of money if you're eating a high meat and/or whey diet.
    I agree.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearedbleedblue View Post
    Terrible study to show this. Athletes that had an intake of .8g/kg of bodyweight in protein or greater were excluded. For someone weighing 220lbs that would equate to 80g of protein a day or less. Yeah BCAA are going to help someone with that low of a total protein intake but for the people around here and anyone that takes their nutrition seriously, we get at least double that every day. More total protein means more BCAA through the whole food sources.

    I still think BCAA are a waste of money if you're eating a high meat and/or whey diet.



    WHAT???? BCAA are a waste of money?

    My Protein Intake maybe is NOT TOO HIGH but i try to eat them thru natural sources meat, dairy products etc. you know and in the day i supplementing with BCAA and for me is enough.
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    Yes, I think they are a waste of money. My physique has gotten better than ever since I started eating more whole food sources and less powdered variants. I must say, I'm not a bodybuilder and I prefer the lean, athletic look to the swole, huge look. I've dropped 20lbs with no loss in strength while only doing minimal workouts. I'm never sore, even after going back to max effort work 3x a week. Saying that you need BCAA for recovery is still something that holds very little water when looking at the research.

    Please, make the argument for why you need to supplement with BCAA, I'm willing to debate this.
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    High dosed luecine at lower caloric levels can be of great assistance to a bodybuilder. that is all =]
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearedbleedblue View Post
    Yes, I think they are a waste of money. My physique has gotten better than ever since I started eating more whole food sources and less powdered variants. I must say, I'm not a bodybuilder and I prefer the lean, athletic look to the swole, huge look. I've dropped 20lbs with no loss in strength while only doing minimal workouts. I'm never sore, even after going back to max effort work 3x a week. Saying that you need BCAA for recovery is still something that holds very little water when looking at the research.

    Please, make the argument for why you need to supplement with BCAA, I'm willing to debate this.
    I only use 25g of BCAA thru the day + 20g of glutamine too and i eating more whole food sources like you but sometimes i not have "whole food" in the moment so drop down my BCAA.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearedbleedblue View Post
    Yes, I think they are a waste of money. My physique has gotten better than ever since I started eating more whole food sources and less powdered variants. I must say, I'm not a bodybuilder and I prefer the lean, athletic look to the swole, huge look. I've dropped 20lbs with no loss in strength while only doing minimal workouts. I'm never sore, even after going back to max effort work 3x a week. Saying that you need BCAA for recovery is still something that holds very little water when looking at the research.

    Please, make the argument for why you need to supplement with BCAA, I'm willing to debate this.
    Simple as this....

    Talk to the big boys. Competitors, pro's ect and they unanimously say that bcaa or eaa have help changed their bodies. There is no supplement that is recommended as strongly by people who know their bodies. Research only says so much and there is a study for every point and counterpoint. DC aka Dante Trudel has read more research than you or I could ever forget and he has them as a staple recommendation
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    I will say this I feel its most viable to use BCAA's during a LONG workout and right after hard training, other than that whole food meat ftw!
    doing my own thang!
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    Quote Originally Posted by goonstopher View Post
    Simple as this....

    Talk to the big boys. Competitors, pro's ect and they unanimously say that bcaa or eaa have help changed their bodies. There is no supplement that is recommended as strongly by people who know their bodies. Research only says so much and there is a study for every point and counterpoint. DC aka Dante Trudel has read more research than you or I could ever forget and he has them as a staple recommendation
    The big boys, competitiors, pro's etc are generally on regular doses of anabolics and thyroid meds.

    Dante does things differently than everyone else. There are too many variables in his system to pin point whether they are that helpful or not. You say there is a study for every point and counterpoint, well show me one that shows BCAA are good when calories/protein isn't low or restricted.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearedbleedblue View Post
    The big boys, competitiors, pro's etc are generally on regular doses of anabolics and thyroid meds.

    Dante does things differently than everyone else. There are too many variables in his system to pin point whether they are that helpful or not. You say there is a study for every point and counterpoint, well show me one that shows BCAA are good when calories/protein isn't low or restricted.
    Dante can tell you why they work because he knows his body. Just like how apparently you know whole foods is giving you a better boody when it could just be how you are training then vs. now.

    If there are too many variables to prove it one way or another. You seem to be contradicting yourself in asking for that proof.


    Take them or don't. I don't need to prove anything to anyone as long as whatever I'm doing is getting me results.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dizmal View Post
    Dante can tell you why they work because he knows his body. Just like how apparently you know whole foods is giving you a better boody when it could just be how you are training then vs. now.

    If there are too many variables to prove it one way or another. You seem to be contradicting yourself in asking for that proof.


    Take them or don't. I don't need to prove anything to anyone as long as whatever I'm doing is getting me results.
    And that is exactly what I hear time and time again. People who know their body and have given them a TRUE shot, ie dosing them high enough and for a long enough time, seems to believe in them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrew732 View Post
    I will say this I feel its most viable to use BCAA's during a LONG workout and right after hard training, other than that whole food meat ftw!
    I also think they can more useful when cutting, though I don't think they're an absolute necessity. On a bulk they're a waste of money.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Type O Hero View Post
    I also think they can more useful when cutting, though I don't think they're an absolute necessity. On a bulk they're a waste of money.
    I agree in theory but nearly every "big boy" expert suggests either BCAA, liver tabs, pepto pro or LBA's. Some form of amino acid seems to be steadfast staple even by people who reject most supplements. We all know steroids help but you would be surprised how low of doses many guys get by on and they really learn their body and are skeptics so supplements. As I learn more and more I start following science less strictly and started letting in reports from the big boys as I call them.
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    with the absence of glucose, the body will look for amino acids to convert to glucose (Gluconeogenesis).
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    During protein metabolism, some protein is converted to glucose in a process called gluconeogenesis, the formation of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources.

    The basic difference between protein and carbohydrate is that while carbohydrates are made out of simple sugars (carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen), protein is made from amino acids (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sufur). The nitrogen is a basic component of the protein's amino acids and accounts for 13 to 20% of the total mass.

    The first step in protein metabolism is to break it into its constituent amino acids. These are absorbed into the blood stream.

    The second step is to break down the amino acids into their constituent parts--catabolism, if you want to get technical about it. This removes the nitrogen or amino group from the amino acids. The process is called deamination.

    Deamination breaks the amino group down into ammonia and what is termed the carbon skeleton. Ammonia is converted to urea, filtered through the kidneys, and excreted in urine. The carbon skeleton--which is composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen--can then by used either for protein synthesis, energy production (ATP), or converted to glucose by gluconeogenesis.

    Most authorities believe that the amount of protein converted to glucose is quite small, except under conditions of intense exercise or metablic starvation. Under these conditions amino acids produce the major source of glucose for blood sugar maintenance.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAxximal View Post
    During protein metabolism, some protein is converted to glucose in a process called gluconeogenesis, the formation of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources.

    The basic difference between protein and carbohydrate is that while carbohydrates are made out of simple sugars (carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen), protein is made from amino acids (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sufur). The nitrogen is a basic component of the protein's amino acids and accounts for 13 to 20% of the total mass.

    The first step in protein metabolism is to break it into its constituent amino acids. These are absorbed into the blood stream.

    The second step is to break down the amino acids into their constituent parts--catabolism, if you want to get technical about it. This removes the nitrogen or amino group from the amino acids. The process is called deamination.

    Deamination breaks the amino group down into ammonia and what is termed the carbon skeleton. Ammonia is converted to urea, filtered through the kidneys, and excreted in urine. The carbon skeleton--which is composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen--can then by used either for protein synthesis, energy production (ATP), or converted to glucose by gluconeogenesis.

    Most authorities believe that the amount of protein converted to glucose is quite small, except under conditions of intense exercise or metablic starvation. Under these conditions amino acids produce the major source of glucose for blood sugar maintenance.
    hmmm I am doing a quick dnp run, better up my bcaa's
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    Enjoying the discussion...
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAxximal View Post
    During protein metabolism, some protein is converted to glucose in a process called gluconeogenesis, the formation of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources.

    The basic difference between protein and carbohydrate is that while carbohydrates are made out of simple sugars (carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen), protein is made from amino acids (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sufur). The nitrogen is a basic component of the protein's amino acids and accounts for 13 to 20% of the total mass.

    The first step in protein metabolism is to break it into its constituent amino acids. These are absorbed into the blood stream.

    The second step is to break down the amino acids into their constituent parts--catabolism, if you want to get technical about it. This removes the nitrogen or amino group from the amino acids. The process is called deamination.

    Deamination breaks the amino group down into ammonia and what is termed the carbon skeleton. Ammonia is converted to urea, filtered through the kidneys, and excreted in urine. The carbon skeleton--which is composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen--can then by used either for protein synthesis, energy production (ATP), or converted to glucose by gluconeogenesis.

    Most authorities believe that the amount of protein converted to glucose is quite small, except under conditions of intense exercise or metablic starvation. Under these conditions amino acids produce the major source of glucose for blood sugar maintenance.
    At least give credit to your source if you're going to copy and paste something.
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