Pro-inflammatories and anti-inflammatories: Effex on Performance

  1. Pro-inflammatories and anti-inflammatories: Effex on Performance


    Didn't have space to write "effects."

    Throughout various threads on AM, I have noticed a lot of discussion pertaining to the use of inflammation-modulating substances in a bodybuilding/athletic context.

    Basically, it seems that inflammatory agonists such as arachidonic acid (ArA) is encouraged to promote better muscle gains from workouts. On the other hand, use of certain anti-inflammatories, in particular NSAIDs acting by COX-1 inhibition, is discouraged peri-workout as it may inhibit gains, as long as you can still work through the pain. But if the user experiences chronic pain, he may decide to use the anti-inflammatory.

    If these claims are accurate, I would like for this to be a storehouse for information supporting these claims, and a discussion on what agents affect what and when, so we can decide how we should use them with that in mind.
    Check your form: http://anabolicminds.com/forum/exercise-science/190675-proper-techniques.html
    Log: http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/235436-tossing-weight-torobestia.html


  2. With that said, here's an interesting review on the matter with several references: http://www.musclemag.com/nutrition-s.../#.UEi6_LJlS2U
    Check your form: http://anabolicminds.com/forum/exercise-science/190675-proper-techniques.html
    Log: http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/235436-tossing-weight-torobestia.html

  3. I have a meeting in a few minutes, so I can substantiate this with some references at a later date (if reminded ).

    Local inflammation, the release of inflammatory cytokines by macrophages in the muscle, as a result of muscle damage, signals repair, I believe in part via trending the paracrine MGF factor release from the muscle cell. This (IIRC) stimulates the myogenic stem cells to fuse with the muscle fiber.

    Now systemic inflammation, and inflammation in areas outside of the muscle is another topic.

    Br
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  4. Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED View Post
    I have a meeting in a few minutes, so I can substantiate this with some references at a later date (if reminded ).

    Local inflammation, the release of inflammatory cytokines by macrophages in the muscle, as a result of muscle damage, signals repair, I believe in part via trending the paracrine MGF factor release from the muscle cell. This (IIRC) stimulates the myogenic stem cells to fuse with the muscle fiber.

    Now systemic inflammation, and inflammation in areas outside of the muscle is another topic.

    Br
    Not just myogenic stem cells but also local satellite cells which proceed to differentiate within the myotube (aka myonuclear accretion). It's a pretty interesting topic and I'd like to hear your take on it
    http://pescience.com/
    http://selectprotein.com/
    The above is my own opinion and does not reflect the opinion of PES

  5. I have to take Celebrex to control pain in my knee. I've been interested in this topic again because it's a daily thing for me now.

    Subbed

  6. Quote Originally Posted by mr.cooper69

    Not just myogenic stem cells but also local satellite cells which proceed to differentiate within the myotube (aka myonuclear accretion). It's a pretty interesting topic and I'd like to hear your take on it
    I read this as well. The breaking down or the plasma membrane releases ARA which signals a localized cascade which involves satellite cells located on the outer layer or muscle tissue. Also, in the book it said that the downward part of the motion where the muscle fibers are stretched out is the best part of movements to cause this breakdown(possible why pause reps help so much). The amount of this release of ARA determines DOMs and one portion of hypertrophy.

    I don't have the book in front of me so I may be off some. The book is Anabolics so I know he was putting a lot of ARA talk in the hypertrophy section. Good read regardless(even for myself, non-steroid guy).
    Training Log
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/271254-what-aw-hell.html
    "Jackie Treehorn treats objects like woman man."

  7. Would also, if an appropriate place, like to here ZIR RED's thoughts on the part of motion in movements(exercises) that stimulates muscle most. Read some of your stuff in the exercise forum and it is very good info.
    Training Log
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/271254-what-aw-hell.html
    "Jackie Treehorn treats objects like woman man."

  8. Quote Originally Posted by rob112 View Post
    Would also, if an appropriate place, like to here ZIR RED's thoughts on the part of motion in movements(exercises) that stimulates muscle most. Read some of your stuff in the exercise forum and it is very good info.
    How about you create a new thread to discuss muscle movements and stimulation and we leave this thread about inflammation
    "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates

  9. Quote Originally Posted by mr.cooper69 View Post
    Not just myogenic stem cells but also local satellite cells which proceed to differentiate within the myotube (aka myonuclear accretion). It's a pretty interesting topic and I'd like to hear your take on it
    I was actually referring to the local satellite cells when I called them myogenic stem cells. I believe they are one in the same.

    In any case, this is what I have from my dissertation regarding the topic of stem cells:

    Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy occurs through increases in intracellular elements and fluid (Flück & Hoppeler, 2003), and has been suggested to lead to an increase in muscle CSA without significant increases in strength (Siff & Verkhoshansky, 1999). Satellite cells (myogenic stem cells) located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of the myofiber have been identified as responsible for mediating a significant portion of sarcoplasmic hypertrophy (Rosenblatt, Yong, & Parry, 1994). When activated by mechanical or chemical stimuli, myogenic stem cells proliferate and fuse to existing skeletal muscle fibers, emptying their contents into the muscle fiber, and thus facilitating repair and growth (Toigo & Boutellier, 2006). Myogenic stem cell fusion leads to skeletal muscle hypertrophy via two mechanisms. First, myogenic stem cell fusion donates nuclei to the skeletal muscle fiber (Moss & Leblond, 1971), increasing the number of myonuclear domains, and enhancing mRNA expression throughout the muscle fiber (Toigo & Boutellier, 2006). Second, myogenic stem cells express various myogenic factors that bind to the muscle gene promoter, thereby aiding in regeneration and growth (Sabourin & Rudnicki, 2000).
    As for inflammation, I need to dig through my reference list at some point and see what I have in there.

    Br

  10. Quote Originally Posted by JudoJosh

    How about you create a new thread to discuss muscle movements and stimulation and we leave this thread about inflammation
    Sounds good
    Training Log
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/271254-what-aw-hell.html
    "Jackie Treehorn treats objects like woman man."
  11. "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates

  12. Excellent discussion, fellas. I think disentangling the different forms of inflammation is the first step required to understanding how inflammation plays very different roles under different contexts.

    Really interesting in seeing what else you have on the matter, zir.

    I'll check out that link, Judo.

    Also, I laughed when I saw this article on the front page today. Talk about timing! http://anabolicminds.com/forum/conte...athletes-1931/
    Check your form: http://anabolicminds.com/forum/exercise-science/190675-proper-techniques.html
    Log: http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/235436-tossing-weight-torobestia.html
  

  
 

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