Body Builder Abuse Includes Breast Drug - AnabolicMinds.com

Body Builder Abuse Includes Breast Drug

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    Post Body Builder Abuse Includes Breast Drug


    Body Builder Abuse Includes Breast Drug


    The breast cancer drug tamoxifen is becoming increasingly popular amongst body-builders desperate to find new ways of boosting their physiques, researchers warned today.

    A new study claims many body-builders are suffering from a psychiatric condition similar to bulimia nervosa, taking extreme measures to enhance their image.

    The Welsh researchers interviewed body-builders seeking to identify those taking drugs to supplement their fitness training.

    Researchers said that as many as 95 per cent of steroid users were taking some prescription-only drugs. And 89 per cent were obtaining steroids on the black market.

    Some of the findings, from a study at the University of Glamorgan, Wales, are reported today in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

    Researchers found that use of ephedrine had increased by 44 per cent, of growth hormone by 24 per cent growth hormone and of tamoxifen by 22 per cent.

    Use of insulin had increased by 14 per cent.

    Tamoxifen is used by body-builders to prevent breast growth.

    Full details of the study are to be reported in the European Journal of Internal Medicine. The researchers do not report what proportion of steroid users they found - although other studies suggest about eight per cent of body-builders use them.

    Researcher Professor Bruce Davies said: "We’re also seeing an increase in the number of women abusing steroids with seven per cent admitting to taking steroids.

    "Our results corroborate research undertaken in the United States, that is, an increasing number of non-athletes are resorting to a combination of drugs with the sole intention of improving their physical appearance."

    Professor Davies said recent US researchers suggest that for every athlete abusing steroids there might be another four non-athletes.

    Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine July 2006

    Date: June 15th 2006

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    oh gosh...is it just me or are we reading the same things over and over?
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    psychiatric condition there speaking about is Muscle dysmorphic or dysmorphy ( not spelled right LOL). You think you are smaller than you really are. Kinda like anorexia..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Irish Cannon
    oh gosh...is it just me or are we reading the same things over and over?
    Just you.

    Seriously, there was a report released in Britain, and then articles appeared which emphasized three different aspects of the report. I posted one of each of those articles so people could see how one fact pattern can be spun differently.
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    I just saw this thread not the other one so was confused what you guys where takking about.. Just saw the other post LOL!!!!!
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    Heres another one Yeahright.


    The body image distortion of men with "muscle dysmorphia" are strikingly analogous to those of women and men with anorexia nervosa. Some people colloquially refer to muscle dysmorphia as "bigorexia nervosa" or "reverse anorexia." People with anorexia nervosa see themselves as fat when they're actually too thin or emaciated; people with muscle dysmorphia feel ashamed of looking too small when they're actually big. Men who experience these distortions describe them as extremely painful resulting in a need to exercise every day, feelings of acute shame about their body image, and lifetime histories of anxiety and depression.

    Men with muscle dysmorphia often risk physical self-destruction by persisting in compulsive exercising despite pain and injuries, or continue on ultra low-fat high-protein diets even when they are desperately hungry. Many take dangerous anabolic steroids and other drugs to bulk up, all because they think they don't look good enough.

    These men's nagging or tormenting worries are rarely relieved by increasing their bodybuilding. Persistent worrying may be termed psychologically as obsessions or obsessional thinking. People are driven to repetitive behaviors (compulsions) in response to these obsessions. According to Pope, Phillips & Olivardia (2000) some men may be aware that their obsessional beliefs are irrational and that their compulsive behaviors are futile. Even with this knowledge they are unable to stop their driven and often self-destructive behaviors. The feelings of shame and endless self-criticism appear to take over any rational thoughts often forcing men to chose catering to muscle obsessions rather than allowing them to lead more fulfilled lives.

    Dysmorphia is an obsessive-compulsive disorder that affects a person's perception of their body image. Most men who have this psychological illness are rather muscular when compared to the rest of the population, but they none-the-less wear baggy clothes and refuse to take their shirts off in public out of fear of being ridiculed because of their (anticipated) small size.
    It can be quite serious and needs to be treated. Dysmorphia might not have as direct an impact on a man's health as anorexia, but its repercussions can still have grave effects on a person's life. Some of the symptoms can cause irreparable damage to the body and the negative impact it can have on one's social life can take years to fix.

    Men who have this illness will spend countless hours at the gym every day lifting weights obsessively. They will always check to see if they gained mass and constantly complain that they are too thin or too small and need to bulk up.

    They will be fixated on eating the right things and adjust their entire life around gaining mass. It might sound like virtually every guy at the gym, but dysmorphia is an extreme case of bodybuilding on the brain.

    Men with this condition exaggerate every aspect of bodybuilding to the point of delusion. Eating the right food will not simply be a conviction; it's going to be a phobia. Time spent away from the gym will cause anxiety and stress, and life outside the gym will suffer.

    Social life, job opportunities, work, dates, and anything else that can interfere with time spent at the gym will take a backseat. In extreme cases of dysmorphia, men will over-workout until they damage their muscles, sometimes permanently.

    Although the sources of muscle obsessions and weight-lifting compulsions are not known with any certainty three arenas are suspected. First there almost certainly is a genetic, biologically based component. In other words people may inherit a predisposition to developing obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The second component is psychological suggesting that obsessive and compulsive behavior may result in part from one's experiences growing up, such as being teased. The final and quite possibly the most powerful source may be the idea that society plays a powerful and increasing role, by constantly broadcasting messages that "real men" have big muscles. These factors lay the groundwork for muscle dysmorphia and other forms of the Adonis Complex in adulthood.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mercedesdd
    Heres another one Yeahright.


    The body image distortion of men with "muscle dysmorphia" are strikingly analogous to those of women and men with anorexia nervosa....................
    Interesting, where was this version published?
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeahright
    Interesting, where was this version published?
    Not sure man!! I had it in my favorties for a long time.. When I was in school for my cpt cert we had to do some papers on it..
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    It is truly an epidemic. Tamoxifen killed my father. And raped my sister.
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    I love how people blur the line between judicious use and abuse. I know I don't abuse Nolva, I don't take any more than I have to over a certain period of time (3-4 weeks). Abuse would entail us taking Nolva willy-nilly and not giving a damn about the dosages. I think the abuse of NSAIDs in bodybuilding is a bigger problem than Nolva use. Clearly these people have far too much time on their hands.
  11. CDB
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    Quote Originally Posted by UHCougar05
    Clearly these people have far too much time on their hands.
    Could be, but it took them this long to catch on to SERM use. Me thinks they're just not the sharpest tools in the shed.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CDB
    Could be, but it took them this long to catch on to SERM use. Me thinks they're just not the sharpest tools in the shed.
    I think you might be right. They don't seem too bright.

    Then again, I know I'd rather be four or five steps ahead of these people instead of just one. Of course, with the "breakthrough" reports we're seeing, I don't think that will be difficult.
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    Problem is that, in the popular media, any use of AAS or ancillaries is considered abuse. I have argued this with folks in numerous venues...even with the feds...they simply consider non-medical (non-prescribed) use of these drugs as abuse, regardless of how they are used.

    It is really a bastardization of the whole concept of substabce abuse.

    Quote Originally Posted by UHCougar05
    I love how people blur the line between judicious use and abuse. I know I don't abuse Nolva, I don't take any more than I have to over a certain period of time (3-4 weeks). Abuse would entail us taking Nolva willy-nilly and not giving a damn about the dosages. I think the abuse of NSAIDs in bodybuilding is a bigger problem than Nolva use. Clearly these people have far too much time on their hands.
  

  
 

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