What happens to steroid molecules after entering the cell nucleus?

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    What happens to steroid molecules after entering the cell nucleus?


    After a steroid molecule binds to a receptor and then enters the cell nucleus to instruct the cell to increase protein synthesis, what happens to the steroid molecule? Does it remain in the cell, or can it leave the cell and move on to another cell?

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    I'm not sure but I think it leaves the cell to be used again until it reaches the liver to be metabolized. Partly why methyltren is so effective even at low dosages is because it easily passes the liver and remains active. Just my opinion.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArnoldIsMyIdol
    After a steroid molecule binds to a receptor and then enters the cell nucleus to instruct the cell to increase protein synthesis, what happens to the steroid molecule? Does it remain in the cell, or can it leave the cell and move on to another cell?

    Steroids enter the cell without a receptor- they enter and then bind to a receptor in the nucleus- no 2nd messanger...
    I also don't know exactly what they do after the biological effects have taken place tho-MY guess would be it stays bound to the receptor instead of leaving the cell until the body degrades it..
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    Androgens binds to ER receptors, then it works on stimulating translation and transcription of many gorwth factors that stimulate protein synthasis.
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    "Free (that is, unbound) steroids enter the cell cytoplasm and interact with their receptor. In this process heat shock protein is dissociated, and the activated receptor-ligand complex is translocated into the nucleus.

    After binding to the ligand (steroid hormone), steroid receptors often form dimers. In the nucleus the complex acts as transcription factors, augmenting or suppressing transcription of particular genes by its action on DNA. As a result messenger RNA is produced that exits the nucleus and interacts with ribosomes. There, after translation of the genetic message, specific proteins are produced. These specific proteins perform a biological task.

    Type II receptors are located in the nucleus. Thus their ligands pass through the cell wall and cytoplasm and enter the nucleus, where they activated the receptor without release of hsp. The activated receptor interacts with the hormone response element, and the transcription process is initiated as with type I receptors.
    "

    And a dimer is (in case you don't know)

    "Dimers are most often observed in signaling. They are crucial to understanding chemical reactions in biochemistry as well. In this case, a dimer is a protein complex made up of two subunits that are not necessarily covalently linked. In fact, they may initially be monomeric proteins. These monomers will dimerize, or join together, usually upon the binding of a signal to the receptor of each monomer. These signals can be a growth factor, a phosphate group from Adenosine triphosphate (usually through a kinase protein), or a ligand.

    An example of this dimerizing activity involves the RAS-independent receptor tyrosine kinase that activates Phospholipase C-gamma. When a growth factor binds to two monomeric Epithelial Growth Factor (EGF) receptor (or Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) receptor), the receptors will dimerize and phosphorylate each other at the SH2 binding domains on the cytoplasmic portion of the receptor. The Phospholipase C-gamma isoform has SH2 domains that bind to the newly phosphorylated SH2 binding domain of the dimerized growth factor receptors. Upon binding, the Phospholipase C-gamma will be activated, and will be close to the membrane phospholipid that it is designed to cleave.
    "
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    Quote Originally Posted by doom3q
    I'm not sure but I think it leaves the cell to be used again until it reaches the liver to be metabolized. Partly why methyltren is so effective even at low dosages is because it easily passes the liver and remains active. Just my opinion.
    I think you mean m-trn, since methyl-tren is different than that and also very toxic. The few reports I have seen, I believe there is an indepth thread on this board to it, shows it being incredibly toxic at dosages in the mcg's. Look for it, this is all from memory, but search methyl'tren and you will eventually find it. I believe the person who took it saw signs of jaundice very quickly.
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