What is a decent deadlift weight for beginner?

  1. What is a decent deadlift weight for beginner?


    I am 36 years old, 5'11", and 208 lbs. Got out of the army rangers and decided to start powerlifting in the civilian world to stay in shape. I did my first deadlift workout ever and got 275 for 5 reps after alot of warmup sets. My form is probably horrible because it felt like my spine wanted to pop out of my lower back. But, is this a decent weight for just starting deadlifts? Kind of bummed because I thought I could lift alot more. Do gains come fast with deadlifts? I was thinking around 500lbs was the average deadlift.


  2. That's a pretty decent first deadlift. 500lb is an extremely good deadlift.

    If you're just starting out, I'd rather see you drop the weight quite a bit and get your form locked in. Deadlifts are one of the best exercises out there, but they also offer one of the best chances for injury with improper form.

  3. Quote Originally Posted by atjnutrition2 View Post
    That's a pretty decent first deadlift. 500lb is an extremely good deadlift.

    If you're just starting out, I'd rather see you drop the weight quite a bit and get your form locked in. Deadlifts are one of the best exercises out there, but they also offer one of the best chances for injury with improper form.

    atj hit the nail on the head. It's really easy to get caught up in the more weight = better mentality with deadlifts...and it is true to a certain extent. however, now is your chance to start out with good form and build a solid base...easier than trying to correct your form down the road or worse, recovering from a back injury.
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  4. just to reiterate what was already said. Really get the form down. Once you get it to where it is correct and comfortable, you will then be able to start adding the weight. DL can be a tricky exercise, when if not done correctly (like most exercises) can do some damage
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  5. Here's some tips: start with 135 until your form is perfect, focus on keeping the bar close to your body, keep your back straight, dont round your shoulders, when you lift keep your head tilted up like a 45 degree angle, not down or straight ahead... WEAR A BELT

  6. I'll probably take a little heat for this one....but I have to disagree with the belt. Get your form down...strenghten the mucsles in the lower back with the deads and other core exercises. I think belts give a false sense of security as well as not allowing for the maximum development of those stabilizers that become all important in helping maintain proper form. Some of the best form deadlifters I've seen go beltless even for their heaviest lifts. I personally don't wear a belt.

    Like I said, I'll probably take a little heat for this, but that's my .02

  7. I completely agree on the belt...I've never worn one for deadlifts and don't think I ever will...I want the DLs to strengthen my back.

  8. I always use a belt over ~75%. I use it as supportive gear. With a good belt you will get slight rebound off of the floor. There are two different schools,
    1. Training for aesthetics (bodybuilding, fitness)
    2. Training for strength (Powerlifting)

    There have conflicting ideas when it comes to many things, including supportive gear such as belts.

    Best of luck with your deadlifting progression!
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  9. I'd say 2x bodyweight is a decent weight. Once you move past 2x bodyweight you're starting to get into the 'good' range.

  10. my opinion on belt usage:

    use it sparingly, maximal lifts only

    when Not to use it:

    Chaos training, (this is where your spinal erectors should be HIT hard)

  11. Quote Originally Posted by cranghel099 View Post
    my opinion on belt usage:

    use it sparingly, maximal lifts only

    when Not to use it:

    Chaos training, (this is where your spinal erectors should be HIT hard)
    From a guy who apparently has a nice set of erectors (lol no homo).

  12. Quote Originally Posted by Usf97j4x4 View Post
    Here's some tips: start with 135 until your form is perfect, focus on keeping the bar close to your body, keep your back straight, dont round your shoulders, when you lift keep your head tilted up like a 45 degree angle, not down or straight ahead... WEAR A BELT
    I disagree......Head should be straight ahead, not up.

    Depending on who you ask, a belt is a no-no.

    I personally use a belt when i go over 225.

    Depending on who you ask, the bar should drag up your legs , held for second , and then the bar should be dropped.......I dont drop the bar though.

    Sometimes depending on the lifter, the back will appear rounded but form is correct........

    Height also plays into it as well. Taller guys seem to get the short end of the stick with deads.

    Form should be spot on before going heavy.

    IMO, it really depends on who you ask on what a proper deadlift execution consisits of.

    Nothing personal USF. I just started ranting. LOL.

    To the OP, at least your doing them. Thats a good thing.

    I love them.

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  13. A belt kinda defeats the purpose of a dead lift if you ask me. If your lifting so heavy that you are afraid of hurting yourself you may wanna back down a little and work up to it.

  14. Quote Originally Posted by willyp View Post
    A belt kinda defeats the purpose of a dead lift if you ask me. If your lifting so heavy that you are afraid of hurting yourself you may wanna back down a little and work up to it.
    I think many of today's great deadlifters would disagree with you on that one, as many if not all wear a belt in competition and for part of their training.

    In some cases a belt adds core stability, in some cases it's a psychological boost, other times it's to help with a real pain/discomfort... Personally i warmp up and do my first heavy sets w/o one, but when I hit my final set I put one on, more as a "just in case" than anything else. Most people are in this for the long run, any extra insurance for a long succesful lifting life is worth having.

  15. Do not look up when you deadlift! Look staight ahead, this will allow your body to recruit your posterior chain better. Wear a belt when you get on your heavier sets, but don't wear it super tight. Wear your belt snug and push against it with your stomach to make it tight. There is no need to stay at 135 to perfect your form, because everyone knows when you get heavier your form will not stay perfect. However, don't go crazy heavy until your form is pretty good. I am no professional, but i have a decent deadlift... 622 lbs. at 198, 22 years old.
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  16. whats all this belt talk...what did i miss?

  17. Quote Originally Posted by raginfcktard View Post
    whats all this belt talk...what did i miss?
    wondering the same thing.

    buy a belt. use it properly, effectively and efficiently...
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  18. Dutch researchers recently did a study on lifting with a belt. The final result was that a belt only gives you a false sense of stability and provides no prvention against injury. Article was found in this months issue of Mens Health Mag.

  19. Your good dude, deadlift progression seems to be really fast, for me at least....


    I'd say don't use a belt, and don't use straps
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    Bench Press 515x3, 315x21, 275x30, 225x43 || Squat 315x39 || Deads 405x33

  20. A belt definitely protects you against injury!!! Pick up 600 pounds without a belt a few times and I bet you will feel a little bulge poking out of your stomach.....that is what we call a hernia!

  21. I couldn't deadlift 600. So, yes I would definately hurt myself

  22. Quote Originally Posted by firstbat71 View Post
    I am 36 years old, 5'11", and 208 lbs. Got out of the army rangers and decided to start powerlifting in the civilian world to stay in shape. I did my first deadlift workout ever and got 275 for 5 reps after alot of warmup sets. My form is probably horrible because it felt like my spine wanted to pop out of my lower back. But, is this a decent weight for just starting deadlifts? Kind of bummed because I thought I could lift alot more. Do gains come fast with deadlifts? I was thinking around 500lbs was the average deadlift.
    From my experience 500lbs takes a lot of getting used to. It took me years to get to 525x3. 275 is fine for now, so just be patient.

  23. Quote Originally Posted by Lene28 View Post
    A belt definitely protects you against injury!!! Pick up 600 pounds without a belt a few times and I bet you will feel a little bulge poking out of your stomach.....that is what we call a hernia!
    that would probably mean you have a weak core
    IronMagLabs Representative - Adrenolin15 = 15% OFF
    Bench Press 515x3, 315x21, 275x30, 225x43 || Squat 315x39 || Deads 405x33

  24. Your core can be extremely strong and you can still get a hernia, when you start messing with big weights anything can happen. Better safe than sorry.
  

  
 

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