protein absorption

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  1. Science has always been years and years behind actual real world evidence and always will be, unless there is an easily visible monetary reward within sight for conducting the research. Just because something has or hasn't been proven yet conclusively doesn't mean that it is or isn't true.

    And if there's one thing that science HAS proven it is that each and every person has a unique genetic makeup, including more metabolic differences and nuances than we may ever know and understand, so to simply lambaste folks for a dietary approach that HAS WORKED because a bunch of lab coats tested some wankers on leg extension strength with two dietary approaches as the only variables doesn't entirely nullify the idea of 2g protein/lbs.

    Finally, don't try to wrap yourself in a shroud of superiority because your field chooses what is and isn't so on behalf of we the sheeple; the medical can't even decide if I should be eating eggs and if cholesterol actually does affect heart disease (we THINK it does so take this lipitor, you dont need your liver anyway!). We're just over 100 years out from a Nobel Peace prize being given for the idea of lobotomies and you presume to tell folks with experience in something that they are wrong and bull headed for not accepting your absolute scientific truths because your field says so something is so?

    Sorry, but I will take both sides of this with a grain of salt and discover what works best for ME. Thank you, come again.


  2. Quote Originally Posted by Birdsizzle View Post
    Like I said in my previous post, I don't mind if you disagree with me. Everyone is entitled to thier own opinion. Unfortunately Neil appears incapable of mature adult conversation so unless he proves otherwise, I'll continue to ignore his silly posts which generally leave much to be desired in terms of useful or insightful content.

    I'm not sure what University you attend but it would be a shame if their nutrition department were sub par. It might say a lot about the other departments there, including the education you're receiving. There are many wonderful, cutting edge research oriented programs out there. As I have mentioned previously, I am lucky to attend such a University. I won't waste much time defending Rodja's vastly overstated assumption other than to say this. Every peice of literature we utilize is from the most current resources available. Much of the time, it is based on emperical, evidenced based research done on campus by one of the leading researchers in the nutrition research field. In our studies, we are not permitted to use any source older than 4 years from date of first publication.

    Again, you can gain muscle at 2 g/lb of body weight. Science has shown it is absolutely unnecessary to take in this much. The same results can be found at 1.2-2.0 g/kg of body weight. If you have success with they way you've formulated your diet, more power to you.

    I'm just amazed at the intensity with which some of you guys defend your idols opinions which are often based on little more than "we ate this much protein and got this big" type evidence. I'm sorry, but I'll take research backed, peer reivewed information every time over the opinion of a "guru".

    I'd be interested to hear Bobo's take on this....

    I attend the same university and their nutrition is very outdated and sub-par.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys

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  3. you attend which university? It makes sense that you would make such a sweeping generalization about a program based on such little actual knowledge about it. If I had to guess, I'd bet you are a member of a fraternity and an exercise sports science major. Am I right? It would make perfect, halarious sense.

    You probably still think glutamine is an effective muscle building supplement. Continue buying into the mythical theories of your bodybuilding gods. I'll continue making just as much physical progress as you with they key difference being that I'm not wasting food, time or money feeding myself with irrelevant calories

    Ps. Post count is not a substitute for intelligence.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by Birdsizzle View Post
    you attend which university? It makes sense that you would make such a sweeping generalization about a program based on such little actual knowledge about it. If I had to guess, I'd bet you are a member of a fraternity and an exercise sports science major. Am I right? It would make perfect, halarious sense.

    You probably still think glutamine is an effective muscle building supplement. Continue buying into the mythical theories of your bodybuilding gods. I'll continue making just as much physical progress as you with they key difference being that I'm not wasting food, time or money feeding myself with irrelevant calories

    Ps. Post count is not a substitute for intelligence.
    Wow, you couldn't be further off base. Am I an ESS major, yes, but I can guarantee you that my supplement, nutrition, and training knowledge are ahead of yours. I can recall you asking me several questions about supplements, Birdsall.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  5. Quote Originally Posted by Birdsizzle View Post

    You probably still think glutamine is an effective muscle building supplement.
    Glutamine is the shizzle my birdsizzle
    Serious Nutrition Solutions Representative

  6. Rodja,

    Lets not jump the gun here. Stick to what you know. You're schooled in training. Don't make rediculous assumptions like you having superior nutrition knowledge than me. That couldn't be farther from the truth. I take extreme offense when someone insults my education. I can assure you we have a top notch nutrition program at our school. I'm not sure who you "questioned", but you need to consider the source here. Were they adjunct or tenured? Does their education and teaching background have anything to do with sports nutrition? Probably not. Our school is one of the top Dietic undergraduate programs in the Southwest. No need to argue with me on this one, take it up with the agencies that do their ratings. Your major is based almost entirely on methods that having been proven scientifically based on results from studies on human performance and weightlifting in an experimental environment. Spare me the BS on not caring what science says.

    I agree wholeheartedly that every individual is unique. The training and exercise that works best for you, may not lead to any improvements for me or anyone else. What science has established is recommendations that are appropriate for the majority of the population. Whether that population is the elderly or competitive weightlifters, nutrition guidelines have been formed by evidence, not assumptions and eyeball measurements.

    After realizing who you are, I take back most of what I said in my PM. I really have very little respect for you, especially the things that have gone on in your personal life. You may think you are some hero on these boards, a far cry from reality..

  7. Quote Originally Posted by Birdsizzle View Post
    Rodja,

    Lets not jump the gun here. Stick to what you know. You're schooled in training. Don't make rediculous assumptions like you having superior nutrition knowledge than me. That couldn't be farther from the truth. I take extreme offense when someone insults my education. I can assure you we have a top notch nutrition program at our school. I'm not sure who you "questioned", but you need to consider the source here. Were they adjunct or tenured? Does their education and teaching background have anything to do with sports nutrition? Probably not. Our school is one of the top Dietic undergraduate programs in the Southwest. No need to argue with me on this one, take it up with the agencies that do their ratings. Your major is based almost entirely on methods that having been proven scientifically based on results from studies on human performance and weightlifting in an experimental environment. Spare me the BS on not caring what science says.

    I agree wholeheartedly that every individual is unique. The training and exercise that works best for you, may not lead to any improvements for me or anyone else. What science has established is recommendations that are appropriate for the majority of the population. Whether that population is the elderly or competitive weightlifters, nutrition guidelines have been formed by evidence, not assumptions and eyeball measurements.

    After realizing who you are, I take back most of what I said in my PM. I really have very little respect for you, especially the things that have gone on in your personal life. You may think you are some hero on these boards, a far cry from reality..
    I don't pretend to be something that I am not. Have I ****ed up in my life, yes, I do not hide from this fact, but I highly doubt that you do not have some skeletons on your closet.

    You do realize that there is huge difference between diatetic nutrition and performance nutrition, right? It is also VERY foolish to try to give a one-size-fits-all recommendation without knowing their heritage, training experience, body type, etc. There are many that use very low carbohydrates in their diets (<30g/day) and replace the majority of these calories with fats and protein. Get off your pedestal, remove your head from your ass, and stop spouting off crap from outdated textbooks.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  8. I absolutely understand their is huge difference between dietetics and sports nutrition. I qouted an article take directly from nsca website. Is this an outdated source? I'd be surprised if you werent a member of that organization. I have no pedestal to come down from. Ive trained at close to to 2 g/lb of bw and also at 2 g/kg per on of bw. Maybe you should try the same. I'm open to any new possibility which is exactly why I tried training with high pro intake. When I did not find a difference in muscle stregnth, endurance, or size when compared to previous intake I concluded all the studies I've read likely hold true.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Birdsizzle View Post
    I absolutely understand their is huge difference between dietetics and sports nutrition. I qouted an article take directly from nsca website. Is this an outdated source? I'd be surprised if you werent a member of that organization. I have no pedestal to come down from. Ive trained at close to to 2 g/lb of bw and also at 2 g/kg per on of bw. Maybe you should try the same. I'm open to any new possibility which is exactly why I tried training with high pro intake. When I did not find a difference in muscle stregnth, endurance, or size when compared to previous intake I concluded all the studies I've read likely hold true.
    So you hold the studies to be true based off of your sample size? What was your total caloric intake during your so-called "experiment." Also, you have no idea what my diet is, so making assumptions about how I personally eat is ignorant.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  10. I like protein, it builds stuff.
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  11. Quote Originally Posted by SteelEntity View Post
    I like protein, it builds stuff.
    And it tastes yummy with salt and pepper.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  12. Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    And it tastes yummy with salt and pepper.
    Oh yeah, tough guy said "yummy"!!

  13. Quote Originally Posted by Hurleyboy05 View Post
    Oh yeah, tough guy said "yummy"!!
    That's how I roll...
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  14. Quote Originally Posted by Birdsizzle View Post
    Again, you can gain muscle at 2 g/lb of body weight. Science has shown it is absolutely unnecessary to take in this much. The same results can be found at 1.2-2.0 g/kg of body weight. If you have success with they way you've formulated your diet, more power to you.

    I'm just amazed at the intensity with which some of you guys defend your idols opinions which are often based on little more than "we ate this much protein and got this big" type evidence. I'm sorry, but I'll take research backed, peer reivewed information every time over the opinion of a "guru".

    I'd be interested to hear Bobo's take on this....

    Umm, again, go ahead and talk to the top strength coaches about this. They don't just say " we ate this much and got this big." That's called straw man debate tactics. That's childish.

    They have far more experience actually working with people than you could ever hope to have, and people like Charles Poliquin collect so much data from so many actual trained athletes that he has his own experimental data to go from. More than you can say about your "studies".

    I love it when there are real world results out there and some ****ing jackas$ comes along and says it's not possible because of some crap he read in a book or some study he read in a class, or what his idiot professor said. Brilliant.

    I'm not disagreeing with you. Disagreeing implies a difference of opinion. I'm saying you're flat out wrong.

    What are your credentials? How many people have you trained? How many olympic and professional athletes have you trained? What kind of results did they get?

    I'll wait on this...it ought to be good.
  15. Never enough
    EasyEJL's Avatar

    Poliquin is such an interesting dude. He does weekly blood tests on his athletes, and micromanages (in a good way) the results for a specific precise blood profile.
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