Blood in urine.. (( To much protein ?? ))

Page 2 of 2 First 12

  1. No prob!


  2. You guys are walking books of knowledge... Hats off to you all. Very impressive.
    •   
       


  3. Quote Originally Posted by Stinger124
    This post is about 3 or 4 weeks old.. He has already went to the Dr.. Told him to lay off of the superdrol even though he did not know what exactly it was. The problem ( If he is telling me the truth ) was a calcium deposit in his kidney.. Anyway, Thats aall I know.. He is back to work, and feeling well, but he said he will be staying away from the SD for a long while..
    a calcium deposit in the kidney = a kidney stone he was just given an antibiotic? I'm not aware of any antibiotic that will dissolve kidney stones.mabey he passed it.I agree with Size proteinuria can cause the urine to be foamy,it is secondary to a kidney issue, but will probably be the first symptom you notice.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by moklepaul
    Too much protein can be bad for your kidneys, yes. He's obviously consuming more than his body is using...

    I didn't think superdrol has any effects on the kidneys though.
    Kidney problems can only be exacerbated by high protein intake, NOT caused by.

    There is probably a larger underlying issue and he should see his doc ASAP. Could just be an infection, but anytime you privates bleed its good to get them checked out (unless you've got really nasty hemorrhoids ).

    edit: just saw how old this is... Glad to hear he's better.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by BUCKNUTS
    a calcium deposit in the kidney = a kidney stone he was just given an antibiotic? I'm not aware of any antibiotic that will dissolve kidney stones.mabey he passed it.I agree with Size proteinuria can cause the urine to be foamy,it is secondary to a kidney issue, but will probably be the first symptom you notice.
    The antibiotic is NOT given to dissolve the stone - it is more as prophylaxis to prevent infection.

    THere isn't a chemical that can dissolve the stone, especially if it is your typical calcium oxalate - it usueallly requires either mechanical or ultrasound to get rid of , or you could just wait and pass it.

    Read above regarding proteinuria and foamy urine - you ar emisinformed if you think foamy urine correlates directly wiht proteinuria.
    •   
       


  6. I know antibiotics don't dissolve stones I was trying to say if the Dr. says he had a stone why did he not address it I should have been more clear.I still say proteinuria causes foamy,frothy urine I realize it is secondary to kidney problems or diabetes etc. but it IS a sign/symptom of proteinuria. I took this qoute from the Cleveland clinic's website it's from a long article about proteinuria and was written by a P.M. Hall MD. He to it seems is "misinformed" the underlined text is from the kidney dialysis foundation and again is a small section of a larger article on proteinuria. I only took the sections dealing with sympoms from both article because as I said I understand that proteinuria is itself a symptom of a larger problem but none the less it causes the urine to be foamy/frothy.
    SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
    Most patients with proteinuria have no signs or symptoms from the proteinuria. In states of heavy (nephrotic range) proteinuria exceeding 3 g daily, the patient might report FOAMY URINE and might demonstrate edema. The FOAMY URINE is due to increased lipid in the urine, which alters the surface tension of the urine. Lipiduria is caused by the filtration of lipoproteins across the damaged glomerular barrier. On urine microscopy lipiduria might appear as free fat, or as fat droplets in tubular cells or casts where they are referred to as oval fat bodies or fatty casts respectively. Edema, which frequently accompanies nephrotic range proteinuria, is caused by reduction of plasma oncotic pressure due to reduced plasma albumin. Hypoalbuminemia is the result of increased glomerular losses and defective synthesis of albumin. At times the hypoalbuminemia and loss in plasma oncotic pressure produce true intravascular volume depletion resulting in hypotension and pre-renal acute renal failure. The loss of albumin stimulates the liver synthetic activity, which also contributes to increased lipoprotein production and hyperlipidemia
    What are the signs and symptoms of proteinuria?
    By itself, proteinuria causes FOAMY OR FROTHY URINE. Patients may also say they see bubbles in the urine. If loss of protein is in very large quantities (more than 3 grams per day), a patient may have the nephrotic syndrome where he complains of swelling of legs, abdominal distention and breathlessness especially on lying down.

  7. First of all, I am a doctor. If you saw my previous post I mention gross proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome briefly for the sake of simplicity.

    A direct correlation means PROTEINURIA = FOAMY URINE which is NOT correct. It is in the differential but they are not pathognomonic. It is SOMETIMES seen tha tis what my point is. Just becuase one has foamy urine does not directly mean that there is proteinurai and vice versa.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by DeerDeer
    First of all, I am a doctor. If you saw my previous post I mention gross proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome briefly for the sake of simplicity.

    A direct correlation means PROTEINURIA = FOAMY URINE which is NOT correct. It is in the differential but they are not pathognomonic. It is SOMETIMES seen tha tis what my point is. Just becuase one has foamy urine does not directly mean that there is proteinurai and vice versa.
    no disreespect intended but I think you are splitting hairs Dr. all I was saying is that proteinuria does cause frothy/foamy urine not in every instance but it can and does cause it.I'm not a Dr. but I do have a BSN and have been a critical care nurse for 14 years and I have seen with my own two eyes foamy/frothy urine from proteinuria.

  9. No prob whatsoever - your contribution was totally positive :-) It is tough clinically to distinguish between foamy urine in a patient with nephrotic syndrome versus a patient with another disorder.

    I must say that the foamiest urine I have ever seen was from a patient who had multiple myeloma - literally looked like palmolive/detergent in water.

    Critical care nurses kick butt!

  10. No prob whatsoever - your contribution was totally positive :-) It is tough clinically to distinguish between foamy urine in a patient with nephrotic syndrome versus a patient with another disorder.

    I must say that the foamiest urine I have ever seen was from a patient who had multiple myeloma - literally looked like palmolive/detergent in water.

    Critical care nurses kick butt!

  11. Quote Originally Posted by DeerDeer
    A direct correlation means PROTEINURIA = FOAMY URINE which is NOT correct. It is in the differential but they are not pathognomonic. It is SOMETIMES seen tha tis what my point is. Just becuase one has foamy urine does not directly mean that there is proteinurai and vice versa.
    This is more helpful as know I understand your stance more correctly. So my info was not completely wrong but rather the implication of a direct correlation.
    Last edited by size; 08-16-2006 at 07:35 PM.

  12. Quote Originally Posted by DeerDeer
    however a state of muscle breakdown called rhabdomyolysis can lead to acute renal failure which usually resolves but on many instances can lead to permanent renal damage. Have him get taken care of ASAP.

    Sometimes rhabdomyolysis can be a result of muscle trauma, commonly mentioned as a side effect of HMGCoA reductase inhibitors, ie: lipitor.
    can you enlighten us a little more on rhabdomyolysis?? Thanks.

  13. Quote Originally Posted by wildman536
    can you enlighten us a little more on rhabdomyolysis?? Thanks.
    Rhamdomyolysis is basically when your muscle breaks down and its byproducts hit the blood stream and flog your kidneys. It's generally toxic and can cause hematuria (blood in the urine) as was pertinent to the intial poster. Other conditions include trauma (which occurs in patients who have had bad accidents involving tons of muscle damage), seizures, alcohol induced, severe dehydration, chemical (ie Lipitor and other HMGred inhibitors, yes, theoretically compnents of RYR could cause this too) including cocaine, ampehtamines.

    So how do we know someone has this? Basically you complain of musle cramps. You check any hard core bodybuilder any given day, his marker of rhabdo (of course with clinicla correlation) his CPK level would be above normal - which is what we look at.

    What the heck do we do about this? Well, we hit patients with IV fluids, replace their electrolytes as needed and hope that the acute episode of renal failure is resolved with all the fluid. Of course we remove the offending agent if it is a chemical.

    Also - I must reenforce that the best supplement one can take is water. Never underestimate its power and is essential for clearing your body of muscle breakdown byproducts.

    Cheers!

  14. Good to have you on the board DeerDeer...

  15. Quote Originally Posted by DeerDeer
    Rhamdomyolysis is basically when your muscle breaks down and its byproducts hit the blood stream and flog your kidneys. It's generally toxic and can cause hematuria (blood in the urine) as was pertinent to the intial poster. Other conditions include trauma (which occurs in patients who have had bad accidents involving tons of muscle damage), seizures, alcohol induced, severe dehydration, chemical (ie Lipitor and other HMGred inhibitors, yes, theoretically compnents of RYR could cause this too) including cocaine, ampehtamines.

    So how do we know someone has this? Basically you complain of musle cramps. You check any hard core bodybuilder any given day, his marker of rhabdo (of course with clinicla correlation) his CPK level would be above normal - which is what we look at.

    What the heck do we do about this? Well, we hit patients with IV fluids, replace their electrolytes as needed and hope that the acute episode of renal failure is resolved with all the fluid. Of course we remove the offending agent if it is a chemical.

    Also - I must reenforce that the best supplement one can take is water. Never underestimate its power and is essential for clearing your body of muscle breakdown byproducts.

    Cheers!
    Thanks for the great response!! i ran across this thread simply because of a pain in my mid back on the rt side of my spine. It feels like more of a muscle cramp or a pull than anything else but is persistent and will not go away. Hoping that its not my kidney and looking very inquisitively at my urine everytime ive come to the conclusion that it is probally just a muscle problem. But do you think that if it was a kidney problem that there would be any other symptoms other than what i have stated? i do have a lower back disk problem and was trying to figure out if i am overcompensating on other areas of my back or whatnot. My urine is clear when i drink alot of fluids (mainly water) and the only time it is a yellowish color is when i wake up in the mourning. if you have any insight please let me know. Thanks

    and sorry to hyjack the thread.

  16. Quote Originally Posted by wildman536
    Thanks for the great response!! i ran across this thread simply because of a pain in my mid back on the rt side of my spine. It feels like more of a muscle cramp or a pull than anything else but is persistent and will not go away. Hoping that its not my kidney and looking very inquisitively at my urine everytime ive come to the conclusion that it is probally just a muscle problem. But do you think that if it was a kidney problem that there would be any other symptoms other than what i have stated? i do have a lower back disk problem and was trying to figure out if i am overcompensating on other areas of my back or whatnot. My urine is clear when i drink alot of fluids (mainly water) and the only time it is a yellowish color is when i wake up in the mourning. if you have any insight please let me know. Thanks

    and sorry to hyjack the thread.
    Lower back pain - could be disk vs muscular vs kidney

    Highest on the list is something disk related as you have already mentioned that there is a preexisting issue already. This cna go hand in hand or have a muscular strain/pull superimposed so I will group these together. You could simply be having muscle spasms - that can also be alleviate with physical therapy or muscle relaxers (ie flexeril prescribed by your doctor).

    As for kidney issues - you think about cva or costovertebral angle tenderness (the little area in your back where your ribs end just under you rlast rib next to the spine, where your kidneys rest) a doctor would make a fist and pound lightly on it to see if there is tenderness which would point to a urinary tract infection which is uslaly accompanied by dysuria or difficulty/burning on urination - really rare in men because of ht elenght of our urethras, girls totally get them more often. Lesser things could be small stones, renal cycts, abscess, ileopsoas strains - but again there is a very small chance it is anythign other than musculoskeletal.

    The best reatemnt overall for back pain is rest. Shut it down for a while, strethc it out, ice it.

    Sorry if it's messy just some off the cuff stuff as i sit and try to digest osme of this turkey. *hic*

  17. thanks for the quick response!! hope your thanksgiving is going well. Im thinking that it is more musc/skel also simply because i am having no other symptoms (Thank God!!) but ill keep it all in mind and make sure i pay attention to it.

  18. i cannot believe he's been on SD all year long... this is going to cause him irreversible damage.

  19. This is a pretty old thread... He has been off since I posted this, and he is back to normal, or from what he can tell he is anyway. He is still maintaining his gains, and looks large and ripped.:bb2: .
  •   

      
     

Similar Forum Threads

  1. To much protein can cause more fat on the body
    By shaun16 in forum Nutrition / Health
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-07-2013, 05:09 PM
  2. Drug test reveals.....blood and protein in urine.....
    By waynaferd in forum Nutrition / Health
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 02-14-2011, 07:54 AM
  3. to much protein?
    By at1010 in forum Supplements
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-06-2009, 07:16 PM
  4. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-04-2006, 03:55 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-03-2006, 03:50 PM
Log in
Log in