changing eating plan

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    changing eating plan


    Im thinking about changing my diet up to continue to bulk but make it a little more simpler. . Current weight 230.. using the mifflin-st jeor method of tdee is 3041

    Old diet
    P 330
    F 135
    Carbs fill in
    Total calories 3466

    Pshake
    Oats
    Olive oil

    Egg (2)
    Egg white (3)
    Greek yogurt
    Spinach

    Brown rice
    Tuna
    Olive oil

    Turkey meat grounded (80/20)
    Natural pb
    Whole grain bread

    Brown rice
    Chicken
    Olive oil

    Eggs (2)
    Egg whites (2)
    Turkey bacom
    Fat free cheese

    Pshake
    Oats
    Fat free milk
    Natural pb


    New diet

    P 332.5
    F 126.5
    C fill in
    Total calories 3656

    P shake
    Oats
    Olive oil

    Sweet potato
    Chicken
    Olive oil

    Brown rice
    Tuna
    Carrots
    Olive oil

    Brown rice
    Peas
    Tuna
    Olive oil

    Brown rice
    Chicken
    Broccoli
    Olive oil

    Eggs (2)
    Egg whites (3)
    Turkey bacon
    Fat free cheese

    Before bed
    P shake
    Oats
    Fat free milk
    Natural pb

    Want to keep gaining and do the best to minimize fat.. I know it comes with the territory.

    Any suggestions would be great.
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    A diet is simply that a diet, i would try to strive for different sources of foods, add in things like yogurts, fruits, trail mix, granola, pasta, maybe some honey/bagels for easier kcals for such a high caloric load. You could reduce meal frequency but that is personal preference. if your making results then why fix what aint broken.

    The key factor is the caloric surplus and controlling it for LBM and slow and steady gains.
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    The products seem legit. The amount will be the factor. I have about the same scedule, though i eat to get 4500 calories
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    Thanks for your input guys, I will work on adjusting some things to get it where it needs to be
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    Your macros look fine. As @The Solution said above, work on getting some more variety in your diet. I see lots of the same thing over and over (brown rice, chicken, tuna, olive oil, etc) Where is the steak, mashed potatoes, bacon, sausage, fruits, etc?
    "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates
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    This is what I have

    Prework
    Oats
    P shake

    Post work
    Karbolic
    P shake

    Meal 3
    Steak
    Sweet pot
    Veggies

    Meal 4
    White fish
    Rice
    Veggies

    Meal 5
    Chicken
    Rice
    Avacado

    Meal 6
    Chicken
    Veggies
    Almond butter

    Meal 7
    3 whole eggs
    8 egg whites
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    What is the macro breakdown and total cals of your new plan?
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntM1564 View Post
    What is the macro breakdown and total cals of your new plan?
    This..
    Listing foods means nothing, its just stuff on a piece of paper
    I would strive for some yogurts, fruit, or other carb sources thrown into the mix because you limit yourself to basic foods, could try throwing in things like ground turkey, ground beef, almonds, nuts, MCT oil's, nut butter..
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    Hi...!
    You have very good food plan , and i think you should not change it in fact am also thinking to chose this plan .
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Solution View Post
    This..
    Listing foods means nothing, its just stuff on a piece of paper
    I would strive for some yogurts, fruit, or other carb sources thrown into the mix because you limit yourself to basic foods, could try throwing in things like ground turkey, ground beef, almonds, nuts, MCT oil's, nut butter..
    This. You need more variety in your diet OP. Not only to keep yourself sane, but to make sure you're getting enough micro nutrients. That is not to say you will have them all covered, but switching foods on a daily or bi daily basis will help. Also, if you keep eating the same thing, it will get boring. I am about to go to work but I will try and find the article tomorrow. Basically, it stated the more a person restricts their diet and eats the same thing over and over, the more likely they are to binge. Adding different things and things you like that may not seem "appropriate" can make it easier for you to follow a eating plan. At least it does for me. I try to fit in something that some people may not and I do not crave sugars and sweets like I did when I was following a monotonous diet.
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    http://www.wannabebig.com/diet-and-n...-clean-eating/

    Applying Moderation: The 10-20% Guideline

    For those hoping that I’ll tell you to have fun eating whatever you want, you’re in luck. But, like everything in life, you’ll have to moderate your indulgence, and the 10-20% guideline is the best way I’ve found to do this. There currently is no compelling evidence suggesting that a diet whose calories are 80-90% from whole & minimally processed foods is not prudent enough for maximizing health, longevity, body composition, or training performance. As a matter of fact, research I just discussed points to the possibility that it’s more psychologically sound to allow a certain amount of flexibility for indulgences rather than none at all. And just to reiterate, processed does not always mean devoid of nutritional value. Whey and whey/casein blends are prime examples of nutritional powerhouses that happen to be removed from their original food matrix.


    Use the 10-20% discretionary intake rule and enjoy life a bit.
    The 10-20% guideline isn’t only something I’ve used successfully with clients; it’s also within the bounds of research. Aside from field observations, there are three lines of evidence that happen to concur with this guideline. I’ll start with the most liberal one and work my way down. The current Dietary Reference Intakes report by Food & Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine lists the upper limit of added sugars as 25% of total calories [24]. Similarly, an exhaustive literature review by Gibson and colleagues found that 20% of total calories from added sugars is roughly the maximum amount that won’t adversely dilute the diet’s concentration of essential micronutrition [25]. Keep in mind that both of these figures are in reference to refined, extrinsic sugars, not naturally occurring sugars within whole foods like fruit or milk. Finally, the USDA has attempted to teach moderation with their concept of the discretionary calorie allotment, defined as follows [26]:

    “…the difference between total energy requirements and the energy consumed to meet recommended nutrient intakes.”

    Basically, discretionary calories comprise the margin of leftover calories that can be used flexibly once essential nutrient needs are met. Coincidentally, the USDA’s discretionary calorie allotment averages at approximately 10-20% of total calories [27]. Take note that discretionary calories are not just confined to added sugars. Any food or beverage is fair game. The USDA’s system is still far from perfect, since it includes naturally-occurring fats in certain foods as part of the discretionary calorie allotment. This is an obvious holdover from the fat-phobic era that the USDA clings to, despite substantial evidence to the contrary [28].

    It’s important to keep in mind that protein and fat intake should not be compromised for the sake of fitting discretionary foods into the diet. In other words, make sure discretionary intake doesn’t consistently displace essential micro- & macronutrient needs, and this includes minimum daily protein and fat targets, which vary individually. This may be tough to accept, but alcohol is not an essential nutrient. Its risks can swiftly trump its benefits if it’s consumed in excess, so it falls into the discretionary category.

    10% Versus 20%

    Another legitimate question is why I’ve listed the discretionary range as 10-20% rather than just listing it as a maximum of 20%. This is because energy balance matters. In bulking scenarios, maintaining a 20% limit could potentially pose health risks that are already elevated by the process of weight gain, which in some cases involves a certain amount of fat gain. Conversely, weight loss tends to be an inherently cardioprotective process, independent of diet composition [29]. So, the 20% limit is more appropriate for those either losing or maintaining weight. Those who are gaining weight but want to play it safe should hover towards the lower & middle of the range (10-15%). Another factor that can influence the upper safe threshold is physical activity level. I’ll quote Johnson & Murray in a recent review [30]:

    “Obesity and metabolic syndrome are rare among athletes, even though dietary fructose intake is often high, underscoring the robust protective role of regular exercise.”


    In the above quote, you can substitute any controversial food or nutrient in place of the word fructose, and the same principle would apply. A greater range of dietary flexibility is one of the luxuries of regular training. Sedentary individuals do not have the same level of safeguarding from the potentially adverse effects of a higher proportion of indulgence foods. And just in case it wasn’t made clear enough, 10-20% indicates the maximum, not minimum discretionary allotment. If someone strives to consume 0% of calories from any food that’s been processed or refined from its original state, then that’s perfectly fine – as long as this is the person’s genuine preference, and not a painful battle of will. I’d also like to make it clear that there is still plenty of grey area in the study of dietary effects on health. As such, the nature and extent of the miscellaneous or rule-free food allotment is a delicate judgment call. In this case, it’s wise to keep scientific research at the head of the judging panel, but don’t ignore personal experience & individual feedback.

    Final Note: Linear Versus Nonlinear Distribution

    A legitimate question is, what’s the best way to distribute discretionary calories? Should they be confined to a daily limit, or can it be a weekly limit? The best answer is to let personal preference decide. If we use a 2000 kcal diet as an example, a flat/linear approach would mean that 200-400 kcal per day can come from whatever you want, while meeting essential needs otherwise in the diet. Weekly, this translates to 1400-2800 kcal, depending on the factors I previously discussed. One nonlinear option would be to break the weekly allotment in half, where 2 days per week you indulge in 700-1400 kcal of whatever you want, keeping the remaining 5 days relatively Spartan. Again, there is no universally superior method of distributing the discretionary allotment. The same principle applies to the choice of foods to fulfill it. Honoring personal preference is one of the most powerful yet underrated tactics for achieving optimal health and body composition. And that’s the nitty-gritty as I see it.
    Team Inov8 Elite Performance
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    Wow thank you guys and solution hell of information just read it twice ha guess I have some adjusting to do
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    Can always trust what Solution says. Hasnt steered me wrong yet.
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